James Eade

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James Eade (born March 23, 1957) is an American chess master, chess administrator, chess tournament organizer, and chess book publisher. He holds the title of FIDE Master. He is best known for the books Chess for Dummies (1996) and The Chess Player's Bible (2004), both of which have been through several editions and been translated into 8 languages.[1]

He became involved in organizing chess tournaments in the 1990s.[2] He organized the 1995 Pan Pacific International Chess Tournament, the strongest chess tournament ever held in San Francisco, won by Viktor Korchnoi,[3] and the 1996 Hall of Fame tournament, won by Lubomir Kavalek. He also founded Hypermodern Press, a chess publishing company which produced a handful of well-received titles before ceasing operations in 1999.[4]

He was a member of the Policy Board of the United States Chess Federation (USCF) from 1996 to 1999. He has served as American Zone President of FIDE, the World Chess Federation, from 2000 to 2002, and has been a Trustee of the U. S. Chess Trust since 2000. He was elected President in August 2010. He is a past President of CalChess (the Northern California Chess Association), The Kolty Chess for Youth Foundation (a 501(c)-3 charity), and the Chess Journalists of America, as well as a former chairman of the chess advisory board for UT-Dallas. He is a former editor and publisher of both the CalChess Journal and the Golden Gate Chess News, and was recently awarded chess educator of the year for 2016 by UT-Dallas.

He lives in Menlo Park, California, where he continues to teach and write about chess.


Books[edit]

Books written by James Eade[edit]

Books Published by James Eade and his Hypermodern Press[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ James Eade at worldcat
  2. ^ James Eade, USCF Member details, Tournaments directed
  3. ^ TWIC 22, March 5 1995
  4. ^ John Watson,Four Small Publishers from the US, The Week In Chess 10 April 1999