Japanese People's Emancipation League

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Not to be confused with Japanese People's Anti-war Alliance.
A former Japanese POW now an Emancipation League member in an Eighth Route Army uniform. (Photo taken by Harrison Forman)
Illustration of Allied countries strangling Hideki Tojo. Flags representing Great Britain, Republic of China, the Japanese People's Emancipation League, and the United States are pictured on the sleeves of each hand.

The Japanese People's Emancipation League (Japanese: Nihon Jinmin Kaiho Renmei)[1] or Emancipation League, was a Japanese resistance organization that operated in communist China during the Second Sino-Japanese War, and World War II.[2]

History[edit]

In 1944, the Japanese People's Emancipation League was established in Yan'an.[2] The Emancipation League had a three-point program: "opposition to the war, the overthrow of the militarists, and the establishment of a democratic, people's government in postwar Japan".[2] It was estimated that the Japanese People's Emancipation League had numbered more than 300[3] to 450 members.[1]

[edit]

The Japanese People's Emancipation League had a banner.[4]

List of Members[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary (1951). Institute of Pacific Relations. pt 7. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off. pp. 2450–2474. 
  • United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary (1956). Scope of Soviet activity in the United States. Parts 50-54. United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary. pp. 3502–3505. 
  • Japanese American Committee for Democracy. Japanese People's Emancipation League: It's Program and Activities: A Japanese People's Movement for a Democratic Japan. 1945.
  • Xiaoyuan Liu (1956). A Partnership for Disorder: China, the United States, and Their Policies for the Postwar Disposition of the Japanese Empire, 1941-1945. Cambridge University Press. p. Jul 25, 2002. 
  • Israel Epstein. My China Eye: Memoirs of a Jew and a Journalist. 
  • Ariyoshi, Koji (2000). From Kona to Yenan: The Political Memoirs of Koji Ariyoshi. University of Hawaii Press. 
  • Agnes Smedley (1972). Great Road. NYU Press. p. 388. 

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary (1956). Scope of Soviet activity in the United States. Parts 50-54. United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary. pp. 3502–3505. 
  2. ^ a b c Roth, Andrew (1945). Dilemma in Japan. Little, Brown. pp. 162-188
  3. ^ Life December 18, 1944
  4. ^ "Yanan (China), banners for school and Japanese People's Emancipation League". University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. 1944.