Jason Baird Jackson

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Jason Baird Jackson, Ph.D. (born 1969) is the Director of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and Professor of Folklore and Anthropology at Indiana University Bloomington.[1][2] He is "an advocate of open access issues and works for scholarly communications and scholarly publishing projects."[3][4] At IUB, he has served as Chair of the Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology and as Director of the Folklore Institute. According to the Journal of American Folklore, "Jason Baird Jackson establishes himself as one of the foremost scholars in American Indian studies today."[5]

Early life and education[edit]

Jason Jackson was born in 1969.

He received his B.A. in sociology from University of Florida in 1990 with a minor in anthropology. He earned his M.A. degrees in cultural anthropology and in folklore, as well as his Ph.D. degree in anthropology from Indiana University Bloomington.

Career[edit]

Jackson was Curator of Anthropology at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma (1995–2000) and Assistant Curator of Ethnology at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in Norman, Oklahoma (2000–2004). He remains a Research Associate at SNOMNH.[6]

A noted scholar in the tradition of Boasian anthropology,[7] Dr. Jackson's research interests include the following areas: (1) folklore and ethnology (intellectual and cultural property issues, folklore and folklife, material culture, religion, ritual, cultural change, ethnohistory, music and dance, ethnobotany, ethnomedicine, social organization, social theory, history of folkloristics and anthropology), (2) linguistic anthropology (verbal art, oratory, language shift, language ideologies, theories of performance, language and culture), (3) curatorship (community collaboration, exhibitions, collections management), (4) American and native American studies (Eastern North America).[8]

Dr. Jackson's ethnographic and historical work has focused on the life of the Yuchi, a Native American people residing today in Oklahoma, USA. He has published and edited several books on Native American topics, including Yuchi Ceremonial Life: Performance, Meaning and Tradition in a Contemporary American Indian Community.[9] He has also published numerous articles based on his studies of Native American ethnography and folklore. Dr. Jackson has additionally spent time as an editor of the Journal of Folklore Research.

Dr. Jackson is the founding editor of Museum Anthropology Review, the first open access, peer-reviewed journal for on the subject of Museum Anthropology.[10] He is also the principal for the Open Folklore Project tasked with "developing tools and resources for open access within Folklore studies."[11][12] He also serves on the Editorial Board for Anthropological Quarterly[13] and is one of the 2017 Visiting Faculty for the Smithsonian Summer Institute in Museum Anthropology, a position he has also previously held.[14]

In June 2001, Dr. Jackson was awarded a Post-Ph.D. Research Grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation "to aid archival and ethnographic field research on the role that social dance, musical performance, and cultural performances more generally, play in the network connecting the Woodland Indian communities of central and eastern Oklahoma into a regional system of exchange."[15]

Representative works[edit]

Google Scholar Citation Index for Jason Baird Jackson (see citation)[16]

  • 2003. Yuchi Ceremonial Life: Performance, Meaning and Tradition in a Contemporary American Indian Community. Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.[17]
  • 2004. “Recontextualizing Revitalization: Cosmology and Cultural Stability in the Adoption of Peyotism among the Yuchi,” In Reassessing Revitalization: Perspectives from North America and the Pacific Islands. Michael Harkin, editor. pp. 183–205. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
  • 2004. Yuchi, pp. 415-428, in Handbook of North American Indians, (Raymond D.Fogelson, ed.), Vol. 14, Southeast. Smithsonian Institution: Washington DC.
  • 2004. Social Organization, pp. 697-706, in Handbook of North American Indians,(Raymond D. Fogelson, ed.), Vol. 14, Southeast. Smithsonian Institution: Washington DC. (with Greg Urban
  • 2004. Mythology and Folklore, pp. 707-719, in Handbook of North American Indians, (Ed. Raymond D. Fogelson), Vol. 14, Southeast. Smithsonian Institution: Washington DC. (with Greg Urban)
  • 2005. Yuchi Ceremonial Life: Performance, Meaning, and Tradition in a Contemporary American Indian Community. University of Nebraska Press: Lincoln, Nebraska, and London.
  • 2006. “On the Review of Digital Exhibitions,” Museum Anthropology, 29(1):1-4.
  • 2008. “Traditionalization in Ceremonial Ground Oratory: Native American Speechmaking in Eastern Oklahoma,” in Midwestern Folklore. 34(2):3-16.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology". Indiana.edu. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  2. ^ "IU's Mathers Museum of World Cultures names folklore professor as new director"
  3. ^ "Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities". usc.edu. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  4. ^ Anderson, Ryan. "Anthropology & Open Access: An Interview with Jason Baird Jackson (Part 1 of 3)". Savage Minds. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  5. ^ "Yuchi Ceremonial Life". University of Nebraska Press. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  6. ^ "Jason Baird Jackson, Ph.D.". Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  7. ^ "Boasian ethnography and contemporary intellectual property debates". Google Scholar. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  8. ^ "Jason Baird Jackson", Indiana University- Bloomington
  9. ^ Jason Baird Jackson. 2003. Yuchi Ceremonial Life: Performance, Meaning and Tradition in a Contemporary American Indian Community. Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
  10. ^ "Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities". usc.edu. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  11. ^ "Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities". usc.edu. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  12. ^ Anderson, Ryan. "Anthropology & Open Access: An Interview with Jason Baird Jackson (Part 1 of 3)". Savage Minds. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  13. ^ "Staff and Editorial Board". Anthropological Quarterly. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  14. ^ "Smithsonian Summer Institute in Museum Anthropology". anthropology.si.edu. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  15. ^ "Grantees". Wenner-Gren. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  16. ^ "Citation Index for Jason Baird Jackson". Google Scholar. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  17. ^ "Yuchi Ceremonial Life". University of Nebraska Press. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 

External links[edit]