Jay Hill

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Jay D. Hill

Jay Hill 2014.jpg
Leader of the Maverick Party
Interim
Assumed office
June 23, 2020
Preceded byPeter Downing
Leader of the Government in the House of Commons
In office
October 30, 2008 – August 6, 2010
Preceded byPeter Van Loan
Succeeded byJohn Baird
Minister of State
Chief Government Whip
In office
February 16, 2006 – October 30, 2008
Preceded byKaren Redman
Succeeded byGordon O'Connor
Member of Parliament
for Prince George—Peace River
In office
October 25, 1993 – October 25, 2010
Preceded byFrank Oberle, Sr.
Succeeded byBob Zimmer
Personal details
Born (1952-12-27) December 27, 1952 (age 68)
Fort St. John, British Columbia, Canada
Political partyMaverick
Other political
affiliations
Conservative (2003–2020)
Reform (1993–2000)
Canadian Alliance (2000–2003)
Spouse(s)Leah Murray
ResidenceCalgary, Alberta
ProfessionFarmer

Jay D. Hill, PC (born December 27, 1952) is a Canadian politician serving as Leader of the Maverick Party since 2020.[1] He previously was the Member of Parliament (MP) for the riding of Prince George—Peace River in British Columbia from 1993 to 2010. He served as Government House Leader in the House of Commons during his tenure (2008–2010). On July 21, 2010, Hill announced that he would be retiring at the May 2011 federal election. In October 2010, he announced he would retire on October 25, 2010.[2]

One of Hill's private members bills resulted in the Adoption Expense Tax Credit, introduced in the 2005 federal budget.[3] His bill called for tax breaks for couples who adopt children.

Hill retired from politics on October 25, 2010.[4][5] He was honoured at a retirement dinner in Fort St. John, attended by Prime Minister Stephen Harper, BC Premier Christy Clark, Reform Party of Canada founder and former Opposition Leader Preston Manning and numerous other colleagues and friends.[6]

Ethics violations[edit]

Shortly after his retirement, Hill was found to have breached ethics rules in the Conflict of Interest Act when took advantage of his previous position and contacted ex-colleagues about a forthcoming multinational energy deal. Canada's federal ethics watchdog found that Hill used his former position to facilitate access to the ministers on behalf of his spouse, Leah Murray, and her employer, National Public Relations, a firm that had drafted a communications plan for the deal.[7]

Western Canadian separatism[edit]

On June 23, 2020, it was announced that following a Zoom conference, Hill was selected as the new leader of the Wexit Canada Party, a political party that has as its stated goal the creation of an independent country in Western Canada.[8] The party's name was later changed to the Maverick Party in September.

Electoral history[edit]

2008 Canadian federal election: Prince George—Peace River
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Jay Hill 22,325 63.59 +3.71 $37,923
New Democratic Betty Bekkering 6,170 17.58 +0.58 $8,563
Green Hilary Crowley 3,656 10.41 +4.00 $7,222
Liberal Lindsay Gidney 2,954 8.41 -7.34
Total valid votes/Expense limit 35,105 100.0     $102,073
Total rejected ballots 125 0.35 +0.06
Turnout 35,230 49
Conservative hold Swing +1.56
2006 Canadian federal election: Prince George—Peace River
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Jay Hill 22,409 59.88 +1.17 $62,176
New Democratic Malcolm Crockett 6,363 17.00 -3.69 $10,141
Liberal Nathan Bauder 5,895 15.75 +1.99 $3,983
Green Hilary Crowley 2,400 6.41 +0.70 $4,838
Independent Donna Young 359 0.96 $589
Total valid votes 34,807 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 103 0.30 -0.14
Turnout 34,807 53 -0.56
Conservative hold Swing +2.43
2004 Canadian federal election: Prince George—Peace River
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Jay Hill 21,281 58.71 -17.04 $53,326
New Democratic Michael Hunter 7,501 20.69 +16.03 $11,997
Liberal Arleene Thorpe 4,988 13.76 -1.77 $19,341
Green Hilary Crowley 2,073 5.71 +3.54 $1,252
Canadian Action Harley J. Harasym 301 0.83 -0.81 $1,028
Marxist–Leninist Tara Rimstad 101 0.27 +0.04
Total valid votes 36,245 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 162 0.44 +0.10
Turnout 36,407 53.56 -3.09
Conservative hold Swing -16.54
Change for the Conservatives is based on the totals of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservatives.
2000 Canadian federal election: Prince George—Peace River
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Alliance Jay Hill 23,840 69.61 +2.70 $47,199
Liberal Arleene Thorpe 5,319 15.53 -1.54 $22,183
Progressive Conservative Jan Christiansen 2,103 6.14 +0.40 $4,980
New Democratic Lenart Nelson 1,597 4.66 -4.32 $4,329
Green Hilary Crowley 744 2.17 +0.89 $1,306
Canadian Action Henry A. Dunbar 562 1.64 $2,640
Marxist–Leninist Colby Nicholson 80 0.23 $8
Total valid votes 34,245 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 118 0.34 +0.03
Turnout 34,363 56.65 -0.90
Alliance hold Swing +2.12
Change for the Canadian Alliance is based on the Reform Party.
1997 Canadian federal election: Prince George—Peace River
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Reform Jay Hill 22,270 66.91 +10.60 $48,148
Liberal Barb Shirley 5,683 17.07 -2.38 $23,330
New Democratic Alex Michalos 2,989 8.98 -2.19 $14,819
Progressive Conservative Charles Lugosi 1,911 5.74 -5.44 $16,754
Green Julie Zammuto 429 1.28 $450
Total valid votes 33,282 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 105 0.31
Turnout 33,387 57.55
Reform hold Swing +6.49
1993 Canadian federal election: Prince George—Peace River
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Reform Jay Hill 20,671 56.31 +41.85
Liberal Jacques Monlezun 7,140 19.45 +7.54
Progressive Conservative Ted Sandhu 4,104 11.18 -28.42
New Democratic Alan Timberlake 4,099 11.17 -22.12
Natural Law Robert Walker 292 0.80
Christian Heritage John Van der Woude 198 0.54
Commonwealth of Canada Dorothy Folk 114 0.31
Independent Archie Tannock 89 0.24
Total valid votes 36,707 100.0  
Reform gain from Progressive Conservative Swing +17.16
1988 Canadian federal election: Prince George—Peace River
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Frank Oberle Sr. 13,903 39.60 -22.84
New Democratic Alan Timberlake 11,684 33.28 +9.17
Reform Jay Hill 5,077 14.46
Liberal Jacques Monlezun 4,183 11.92 +1.97
Independent Howard Karpes 169 0.48
Confederation of Regions Lorne W. Backus 89 0.25 -0.74
Total valid votes 35,105 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -16.00

References[edit]

  1. ^ Corbella, Licia (June 23, 2020). "Corbella: Jay Hill takes the reins of Wexit — bad news for Canada". Retrieved June 23, 2020.
  2. ^ "Jay Hill's exit spurs election speculation". The Globe and Mail. July 21, 2010. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  3. ^ "2005 Budget Plan: Adoption Expense Tax Credit". Department of Finance Canada. Retrieved February 4, 2015.
  4. ^ "Tory House leader Hill won't seek re-election". CBC News. July 21, 2010. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  5. ^ "Jay Hill leaves Parliament on his own terms", Globe and Mail, July 30, 2010
  6. ^ "Prime Minister and Premier honour former MP Jay Hill". EnergeticCity.ca. October 16, 2011. Retrieved October 16, 2011.
  7. ^ "Former Conservative MP Jay Hill broke rules, ethics watchdog says". Global News. March 26, 2013. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  8. ^ "Jay Hill, former House leader under Harper, named interim head of separatist party Wexit Canada". CBC News. June 23, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.

External links[edit]

28th Ministry – Cabinet of Stephen Harper
Cabinet post (1)
Predecessor Office Successor
Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons
2008–2010
John Baird
Sub-Cabinet Post
Predecessor Title Successor
Karen Redman Minister of State
(2007–2008)
(Also served as Chief Government Whip)
Gordon O'Connor