Jayson Lusk

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Lusk discussed his book The Food Police on agricultural-based television show Horizons.[1]

Jayson Lusk (born 1974) is an economist, Distinguished Professor and Department Head in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Purdue University.[2] He authors books and articles related to contemporary food policy issues.[3]

Education and Career[edit]

Lusk received his B.S. in Food Technology in 1997, from Texas Tech University, and his Ph.D. from Kansas State University in Agricultural Economics. Lusk began his career as assistant professor at Mississippi State University and then associate professor at Purdue University from 2000 to 2005. From 2005 to 2013 Lusk was Professor and Willard Sparks Endowed Chair at Oklahoma State University, Department of Agricultural Economics during that time he also was a Visiting Researcher at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research. In 2017 Lusk became Distinguished Professor and Head of Purdue University, Department of Agricultural Economics.[4]

Over his career, Lusk has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles in academic journals, including the Economic Journal, the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, and Journal of Environmental Economics and Management.[5] Lusk's first popular press book The Food Police: A Well-fed Manifesto about the Politics of Your Plate criticized modern food policies as being intrusive.[6] He frequently appears on Fox News to discuss research related to food.[7] His second book Unnaturally Delicious: How Science and Technology are Serving Up Super Foods to Save the World describes how Lusk believes that changes in food technology can save the planet.[8]

Awards[edit]

He is a Fellow and Past President of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association[9]. In 2018, he was awarded the Borlaug Communication Award from the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology [10]. He has received outstanding journal article awards from Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, European Review of Agricultural Economics, Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, and Review of Agricultural Economics [11].

Controversy[edit]

Lusk has found that people perceive obesity is primarily the responsibility of individuals,[12] and that commonly proposed public policies, such as soda taxes, are unlikely to successfully reduce rates of obesity.[13] He has suggested that meat packing regulations were partially motivated by the public's response to Upton Sinclair's socialist manifesto, The Jungle,[14]. His agricultural economics department at Purdue University is actively involved in outreach and education of agribusiness professionals [15] and commercial agricultural producers [16].

Books[edit]

  • Unnaturally Delicious: How Science and Technology are Serving Up Super Foods to Save the World. 2016. St. Martin's Press. ISBN 978-1250074300.
  • The Food Police: A Well-Fed Manifesto About the Politics of Your Plate. 2013. Crown Forum. ISBN 978-0307987037.
  • Compassion, by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare, with F. Bailey Norwood. 2011. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0199551163.
  • Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Food Consumption an Policy, edited with Jutta Roosen and Jason Shogren. 2011. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0199569441.
  • Experimental Auctions: Methods and Applications in Economic and Marketing Research (Quantitative Methods for Applied Economics and Business Research), with Jason Shogren. 2008. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0521671248.
  • Agricultural Marketing and Price Analysis, with F. Bailey Norwood. 2007. Prentice Hall. ISBN 978-0132211215.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jayson Lusk - The Food Police. Oklahoma Horizon TV
  2. ^ Purdue University Department of Agricultural Economics https://ag.purdue.edu/agecon/Pages/Profile.aspx?strAlias=jlusk&intDirDeptID=4
  3. ^ Lusk, Jayson and Henry Miller. "We Need G.M.O. Wheat." The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/03/opinion/we-need-gmo-wheat.html?_r=0 Feb. 2, 2014. Retrieved, Nov. 21, 2015.
  4. ^ Lusk, Jayson L. "CV" (PDF). Jayson Lusk Agricultural Economist. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  5. ^ Jayson Lusk CV
  6. ^ Lusk, Jayson. "Viewpoint: The New Food Police Are Out of Touch." http://ideas.time.com/2013/05/06/viewpoint-the-new-food-police-are-out-of-touch/ May 6, 2013. Time Magazine. Retrieved Nov. 21, 2015.
  7. ^ Lusk, Jayson. "Is Meat Really Ruining the Environment?" http://video.foxnews.com/v/4076705472001/is-meat-really-ruining-the-environment/ Feb. 23, 2015. Retrieved, Nov. 21, 2015.
  8. ^ Berenstein, Nadia. "Will the Food of the Future be 'Unnaturally Delicious'?". Popular Science. Retrieved 31 May 2018.
  9. ^ AAEA Fellows: Jayson Lusk https://www.aaea.org/about-aaea/awards-and-honors/aaea-fellows/previous-aaea-fellows/jayson-l-lusk
  10. ^ https://www.cast-science.org/2017-borlaug-cast-communication-award/
  11. ^ http://jaysonlusk.com/about
  12. ^ Lusk, Jayson L., and Brenna Ellison. "Who is to blame for the rise in obesity?." Appetite 68 (2013): 14-20.
  13. ^ The Food Police, p. 146.
  14. ^ ' 'The Food Police' ', p. 49.
  15. ^ https://agribusiness.purdue.edu/
  16. ^ https://ag.purdue.edu/commercialag/home/

External links[edit]