Jean-Serge Bokassa

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Jean-Serge Bokassa (born 25 February 1971) is a Central African politician who has served in the government of the Central African Republic as Minister of the Interior since 2016. Previously he was Minister of Youth, Sports, Arts, and Culture from 2011 to 2013. He is a son of Jean-Bédel Bokassa, who ruled the Central African Republic from 1966 to 1979.

Life and career[edit]

Born in Bangui in 1971, Jean-Serge was a son of Bokassa and Joelle Aziza Eboulia (1955–2001). When his father became Emperor of the Central African Empire on 4 December 1976, Jean-Serge, along with his siblings, became a Prince with the style Imperial Highness.[1] He was enrolled at a Swiss boarding school when his father was overthrown in 1979. As a result, he was taken out of the school and along with other family members went into exile in Gabon.[2]

The family eventually returned from exile and Jean-Serge was elected to the National Assembly of the Central African Republic. While speaking warmly of his father, saying that he was a loving family man and "a patriot" who was the victim of "character assassination by media", he has described Bokassa's creation of a monarchy as "indefensible".[2]

Under President François Bozizé, Bokassa was appointed as Minister of Youth, Sports, Arts, and Culture in April 2011. He served in that post until 2013. In the December 2016 presidential election, he stood unsuccessfully as a presidential candidate; subsequently he backed the candidacy of Faustin-Archange Touadéra for the second round, held in February 2016. Touadéra won the election, and after taking office he appointed Bokassa to the government as Minister of the Interior, Public Security and Territorial Administration on 11 April 2016.[3]

Ancestry[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jean-Bedel Bokassa Genealogy". Archived from the original on December 21, 2008. Retrieved 3 January 2009. 
  2. ^ a b Thomson, Mike (2009-01-02). "'Good old days' under Bokassa?". BBC. Retrieved 2009-01-03. 
  3. ^ Vincent Duhem, "Centrafrique : ce qu’il faut retenir du nouveau gouvernement dévoilé par Touadéra", Jeune Afrique, 13 April 2016 (French).