Jeffrey Schaler

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Jeffrey Alfred Schaler is an author, editor, and former professor of justice, law, and society at American University. He is a prominent critic of psychiatric claims and practices, especially of treatment without consent. Schaler opposes the medicalization of addiction.[1][2][3] He is also a practicing psychotherapist.[4]

In 1973, Schaler earned a Bachelor’s degree in Human Interaction and Group Dynamics from the School for Social Research and Action at Antioch College. He received a Master of Education from the University of Maryland in 1986. He obtained a Doctorate of Philosophy from the University of Maryland in 1993, with a dissertation titled, Addiction Beliefs of Treatment Providers: Factors Explaining Variance.[5]

Schaler has authored scores of articles for academic and popular publications. He was editor-in-chief of Current Psychology: A Journal for Diverse Perspectives on Diverse Psychological Issues from 2005 to 2014. He has edited several books, including Szasz Under Fire: The Psychiatric Abolitionist Faces His Critics[6], Peter Singer Under Fire: The Moral Iconoclast Faces Critics[7], and Howard Gardner Under Fire: The Rebel Psychologist Faces His Critics[8]. He is a co-editor of and contributor to Thomas S. Szasz: The Man and His Ideas[9]. Many of Schaler’s views on mental health and addiction intersect with those of his long-time friend and associate, Thomas Szasz, whose authorized web site he created and maintains.[10] In February 2006, Schaler accepted the Thomas S. Szasz Award from the Citizens Commission on Human Rights.[11]

Schaler is best known as the author of Addiction Is a Choice[12], in which he challenges the widely held view that addiction has a physiological basis. Schaler asserts that "the contention that addiction is a disease is empirically unsupported. Addiction is a behavior and thus clearly intended by the individual person.” He argues that what is called “addiction” is actually "an ethical, not medical, problem in living."[13]

Schaler resides in Silver Springs, Maryland.

Additional publications, partial[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Do Drugs Cause Addiction?" (PDF). debatesdebates. August 26, 1996. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  2. ^ Andy Denhart (January 10, 2000). "Is being hooked a choice?". salon.com. Salon. Retrieved 8 May 2018.
  3. ^ Jennifer K. Ruark (April 21, 2000). "Verbatim". chronicle.com. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved 8 May 2018.
  4. ^ "Curriculum Vitae of JEFFREY A. SCHALER, PH.D., LLC" (PDF). schaler.net. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  5. ^ "Curriculum Vitae of JEFFREY A. SCHALER, PH.D., LLC" (PDF). schaler.net. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  6. ^ Jeffrey A. Schaler, ed. (2004). "Szasz Under Fire: A Psychiatric Abolitionist Faces His Critics". Open Court. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  7. ^ Jeffrey A. Schaler, ed. (2009). "Peter Singer Under Fire: The Moral Iconoclast Faces His Critics". books.google.com. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  8. ^ Jeffrey A. Schaler, ed. (2006). "Howard Gardner Under Fire: The Rebel Psychologist Faces His Critics". books.google.com. Open Court. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  9. ^ Jeffrey A. Schaler, Henry Zvi Lothane, Richard E. Vatz, eds. (2017). "Thomas S. Szasz: The Man and His Ideas". books.google.com. Routledge. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  10. ^ Jeffrey A. Schaler, ed. "The Szasz Site". Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  11. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lj09Dim0b3I
  12. ^ Jeffrey A. Schaler (2000). "Addiction is a Choice". books.google.com. Open Court. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  13. ^ Jeffrey A. Schaler (October 1, 2002). "Addiction is a choice". psychiatrictimes.com. Psychiatric Times. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  14. ^ Jeffrey A. Schaler, Magda E. Schaler, eds. (1998). "Smoking: Who Has The Right?". books.google.com. Prometheus Books. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  15. ^ Jeffrey A. Schaler, ed. "Drugs: Should We Legalize, Decriminalize, Or Deregulate?". books.google.com. Prometheus Books. Retrieved 7 May 2018.