Jerry Hicks (trade unionist)

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Jerry Hicks is a British trade unionist.[1] He was the convenor of the Amicus union at Rolls-Royce in Bristol, and was dismissed in 2005.[2] An employment tribunal found that he had "probably been dismissed on trade union grounds".[3]

Jerry-hicks.jpg

In 2009, he stood as General Secretary of Amicus, winning 40,000 votes to the Derek Simpson's 60,000.[4]

Hicks stood in the 2010 election for the general secretary of Unite the Union and made a number of election pledges, including that he would only take the wage of an average skilled worker. He came second with 52,527 votes, beating the two full-time assistant general secretaries who stood. He has in total run 3 times, unsuccessfully, for the leadership of Unite.

Hicks is a member of the Respect Party and of its National Council.[5] He was a candidate for election to Bristol Council in May 2009.[6][7]

Hicks wrote an article in support on Union Day of action including strike action by public sector workers principally on the issue of Government attack on public sector pensions[8]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mulholland, Helene (16 September 2010). "Unity is strength? Leadership poll splits UK's biggest union". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 2 October 2010. 
  2. ^ "Rolls-Royce strike action starts". BBC News. 22 August 2005. 
  3. ^ "Rolls-Royce ballot backs strike". BBC. 11 August 2005. Retrieved 2 October 2010. 
  4. ^ Helm, Toby (8 March 2009). "Simpson re-elected as joint leader of Unite". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 2 October 2010. 
  5. ^ "Jerry Hicks speaks to The Respect Paper about his campaign". The Respect Party. Archived from the original on 14 April 2010. Retrieved 2 October 2010. 
  6. ^ Benenfield, Jo. "We all deserve more Respect". The Respect Party. Archived from the original on 29 May 2009. Retrieved 2 October 2010. 
  7. ^ "Local Election Results - Bristol City Council". Retrieved 2 October 2010. 
  8. ^ Hicks, Jerry. "Pensions, rhetoric and backing for walkouts". Thisisbristol. Retrieved 17 February 2013.