Jineterismo

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In Cuba, jineterismo is a category of illegal or semi-legal economic activities related to tourism in Cuba.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14] Prostitution is a way some Cubans use to get out of Cuba, having sex with a tourist for help getting off the island nation. These activities include prostitution and pimping, as well as other forms of hustling, such as selling black-market and counterfeit goods. The term derives from the Spanish jinete ("horserider").[15] A jinetera is Cuban slang for a female sex worker. The United States Department of State defines jinetero as:

[16]

Prostitution in Cuba[edit]

Prostitution has always been a legal profession in Cuba, though it has periodically been regulated or repressed. The country, and Havana in particular, has often been associated with prostitution in foreign eyes. During the first half of the 20th century Havana was thought of and depicted as "the whorehouse of the Caribbean".[17] Following the Cuban Revolution in 1959 prostitution was eliminated from Cuba, a situation which continued for three decades. Prostitution re-appeared in the 1990s along with the reintroduction of elements of market capitalism into the economy.[18]

Prostitution is not illegal in Cuba, and sex tourism has existed in the country, both before and after the revolution. Many Cubans do not consider the practice immoral.[19] Julia O'Connell Davidson notes in her 1996 article "Sex Tourism in Cuba" that "in Cuba there is no network of brothels, no organised system of bar prostitution: in fact third party involvement in the organisation of prostitution is rare". Economic need is the primary motivation to enter the trade, but the situation has some differences from other developing countries. Prostitutes in Cuba do not work in oppressive conditions, alcohol and drug addiction are not routes into prostitution, and people are not sold into prostitution by their families.[20]

Although prostitution in Cuba is not illegal but has been repressed since 1959.[21][22][23][24] In Cuban slang, female prostitutes are called Jineteras[19] and gay male prostitutes are called Jinteros.[25] The terms literally mean "jockey" or "rider", and colloquially "sexual jockey"[19]. Child prostitution has been reported - the clientele is mainly sex tourists.[26][27]

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union prostitution has grown.[19][28][29][30][31][32][33][34]

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bunck, Julie Marie (1 November 2010). "Fidel Castro and the Quest for a Revolutionary Culture in Cuba". Penn State Press. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  2. ^ Morad, Dr Moshe (28 January 2015). "Fiesta de diez pesos: Music and Gay Identity in Special Period Cuba". Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  3. ^ Miller, John; Kenedi, Aaron (1 January 2003). "Inside Cuba: The History, Culture, and Politics of an Outlaw Nation". Da Capo Press. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  4. ^ Cap, Fr Pat Sullivan O. F. M. (11 July 2012). "Four Years In Castro's Cuba: An American Priest's Experience 1994-1998". AuthorHouse. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  5. ^ Griffiths, Tom G.; Millei, Zsuzsa (11 September 2012). "Logics of Socialist Education: Engaging with Crisis, Insecurity and Uncertainty". Springer Science & Business Media. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  6. ^ Hamilton, Carrie (12 March 2012). "Sexual Revolutions in Cuba: Passion, Politics, and Memory". UNC Press Books. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  7. ^ Kempadoo, Kamala (1 January 1999). "Sun, Sex, and Gold: Tourism and Sex Work in the Caribbean". Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  8. ^ Brenner, Philip (1 January 2008). "A Contemporary Cuba Reader: Reinventing the Revolution". Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  9. ^ Sippial, Tiffany A. (1 January 2013). "Prostitution, Modernity, and the Making of the Cuban Republic, 1840-1920". UNC Press Books. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  10. ^ "Cuba Counters Prostitution with AIDS Program". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  11. ^ (www.dw.com), Deutsche Welle. "Why prostitution is a powerful metaphor in Cuban film - Film - DW.COM - 08.11.2016". Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  12. ^ "How Cuba became the newest hotbed for tourists craving sex with minors". Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  13. ^ "Canadians are major customers in Cuba's child sex market - Toronto Star". Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  14. ^ "Visit Cuba - it's the perfect holiday destination for poverty fetishists - Coffee House". 23 July 2015. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  15. ^ Cynthia Pope, "The Political Economy of Desire: Geographies of Female Sex Work in Havana, Cuba", Journal of International Women's Studies 6, no. 2 (June 2005): pp 101
  16. ^ "Cuba". U.S. Department of State. Retrieved 2009-04-09. 
  17. ^ Ditmore 2006, p. 202.
  18. ^ Ditmore 2006, p. 245.
  19. ^ a b c d Whiteford & Branch 2008, p. 80.
  20. ^ Trumbull, Charles (30 November 2001). "Prostitution and Sex Tourism in Cuba". Association for the Study of the Cuban Economy (ASCE). 
  21. ^ Bunck, Julie Marie (1 November 2010). "Fidel Castro and the Quest for a Revolutionary Culture in Cuba". Penn State Press. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  22. ^ Morad, Dr Moshe (28 January 2015). "Fiesta de diez pesos: Music and Gay Identity in Special Period Cuba". Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  23. ^ Miller, John; Kenedi, Aaron (1 January 2003). "Inside Cuba: The History, Culture, and Politics of an Outlaw Nation". Da Capo Press. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  24. ^ Cap, Fr Pat Sullivan O. F. M. (11 July 2012). "Four Years In Castro's Cuba: An American Priest's Experience 1994-1998". AuthorHouse. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  25. ^ Ditmore 2006, p. 80.
  26. ^ "Canadians are major customers in Cuba's child sex market - Toronto Star". Retrieved 26 January 2017.  - March 2013
  27. ^ "How Cuba became the newest hotbed for tourists craving sex with minors". Retrieved 26 January 2017.  - March 2013
  28. ^ Griffiths, Tom G.; Millei, Zsuzsa (11 September 2012). "Logics of Socialist Education: Engaging with Crisis, Insecurity and Uncertainty". Springer Science & Business Media. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  29. ^ Hamilton, Carrie (12 March 2012). "Sexual Revolutions in Cuba: Passion, Politics, and Memory". UNC Press Books. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  30. ^ Kempadoo, Kamala (1 January 1999). "Sun, Sex, and Gold: Tourism and Sex Work in the Caribbean". Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  31. ^ Brenner, Philip (1 January 2008). "A Contemporary Cuba Reader: Reinventing the Revolution". Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  32. ^ Sippial, Tiffany A. (1 January 2013). "Prostitution, Modernity, and the Making of the Cuban Republic, 1840-1920". UNC Press Books. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  33. ^ "Cuba Counters Prostitution with AIDS Program". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  34. ^ (www.dw.com), Deutsche Welle. "Why prostitution is a powerful metaphor in Cuban film - Film - DW.COM - 08.11.2016". Retrieved 26 January 2017.