Joe Rogers

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For other people named Joe Rogers, see Joe Rogers (disambiguation).
Joseph Bernard "Joe" Rogers
FEMA - 4131 - Photograph by Michael Rieger taken on 09-22-2001 in New York.jpg
Joe Rogers (right) and FEMA Urban Search and Rescue team leader Pete Bakersky (left) on September 22, 2001, shortly after 9/11.
45th Lieutenant Governor of Colorado
In office
January 12, 1999 – January 14, 2003
Governor Bill Owens
Preceded by Gail Schoettler
Succeeded by Jane E. Norton
Personal details
Born (1964-07-08)July 8, 1964
Omaha, Nebraska, U.S.
Died October 7, 2013(2013-10-07) (aged 49)
Denver, Colorado, U.S.
Resting place

Fairmount Cemetery

Denver, Colorado
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Juanita Rogers
Alma mater Colorado State University
Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law
Religion Christianity[1]

Joseph Bernard "Joe" Rogers (July 8, 1964 – October 7, 2013) was an American politician who was the youngest Lieutenant Governor in Colorado history.[2]

Background[edit]

Rogers was born on July 8, 1964 in Omaha, Nebraska to Joe Louis Rogers and Lola Marie Rogers.[3] He later moved with his family to Colorado. He received his bachelor's degree from Colorado State University and his law degree from Arizona State University College of Law. He then practiced law in Colorado. Rogers was a member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity.[4]

Political career[edit]

In 1996, Rogers ran for Colorado's First Congressional District as a Republican, gaining 42% of the vote.[5] In 1998 he became the second black lieutenant governor of Colorado after George L. Brown, who served from 1975 to 1979. Personal and political conflicts with his running mate, Governor Bill Owens, kept him off the reelection ticket in 2002. Rogers instead ran in the newly created 7th Congressional District, but placed last out of four in the Republican primary, receiving just 13% of the vote, behind the eventual winner in the general election, Bob Beauprez.

Rogers died after being admitted to the hospital due to back pains on October 7, 2013.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Gail Schoettler
Lieutenant Governor of Colorado
1999–2003
Succeeded by
Jane E. Norton