John H. Hubbard

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John Hamal Hubbard
JHHubbard.jpg
Hubbard at Oberwolfach
Born (1945-10-06) October 6, 1945 (age 71)
Residence Ithaca, NY
Institutions Cornell University (current), Harvard University
Alma mater Université de Paris-Sud
Harvard University
Thesis Sur Les Sections Analytiques de La Courbe Universelle de Teichmüller (1973)
Doctoral advisor Adrien Douady
Doctoral students Sarah C. Koch
Dierk Schleicher
Website
www.math.cornell.edu/People/Faculty/hubbard.html

John Hamal Hubbard was born on October 6 or 7, 1945 (the actual date is unknown). He is an American mathematician who is currently a professor at Cornell University and the Université de Provence. He is well known for the mathematical contributions he made with Adrien Douady in the field of complex dynamics, including a study of the Mandelbrot set. One of their most important results is that the Mandelbrot set is connected.

Background[edit]

Hubbard graduated with a Doctorat d'État from Université de Paris-Sud in 1973 under the direction of Adrien Douady; his thesis was entitled Sur Les Sections Analytiques de La Courbe Universelle de Teichmüller and was published by the American Mathematical Society. Hubbard has a variety of mathematical interests ranging from complex analysis to differential geometry. He has written many influential papers on complex dynamics,[1][2][3] and he has written several books.

Legacy[edit]

In 2006, he has completed another: the first volume of a series devoted to Teichmüller theory and applications to four revolutionary theorems of William Thurston. Hubbard is a former student of Harvard University's infamous Math 55, where he famously struggled initially because he "just didn't know proofs," a somewhat shocking fact considering his eventual mathematical success. He later returned to Harvard to teach that same class. However, Hubbard garnered a rather profound distaste for Math 55's method of teaching proofs largely centered on algebraic induction. In response, he wrote a book entitled Vector Calculus, Linear Algebra, and Differential Forms: A Unified Approach, on which his wife Barbara is listed as a co-author.

Personal life[edit]

He is married to Barbara Burke Hubbard, the science writer. Together they have a son, Alexander, and three younger daughters, Eleanor, Judith and Diana. The children sometimes help them with their books, in illustration, writing answer keys and pointing out the minor errors.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douady, Adrien; Hubbard, John Hamal (1985). "On the dynamics of polynomial-like mappings". Annales Scientifiques de l'École Normale Supérieure. 18 (2): 287–343. Retrieved 2007-03-11. 
  2. ^ Hubbard, John H; Oberste-Vorth, Ralph W. (1994). "Hénon mappings in the complex domain I : the global topology of dynamical space". Publications Mathématiques de l'IHÉS. 79: 5–46. doi:10.1007/bf02698886. Retrieved 2007-03-11. 
  3. ^ John H. Hubbard and Ralph W. Oberste-Vorth (1994) Henon mappings in the complex domain II: projective and inductive limits of polynomials
  4. ^ Hubbard, John; Hubbard, Barbara. Vector Calculus, Linear Algebra, and Differential Forms: A Unified Approach

External links[edit]