John Paterson (architect)

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Paterson lived in a flat at 24 Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh
Barmoor Castle.
Pinkie House West Face
Leith Bank, Bernard Street, Edinburgh

John Paterson (died 1832) was a Scottish architect who trained with Robert Adam (1728-1792) whom he assisted with his work on Edinburgh University Old College and Seton House Castle.[1][2]

Life[edit]

He was the second son of George Paterson (d.1789) an Edinburgh architect and builder linked to Robert Mylne and living on St John Street in the Canongate in a building he had built with Francis Charteris, Earl of Wemyss and March and thereafter shared.[3] Its site is remembered in the building Charteris Land, a moderm building which replaced it. The family also owned a small estate at Monimail in Fife called Cunnochie. The estate passed to the oldest son (also George Paterson) on the death of the father.

John lived on St John Street until 1784 and then moved to Elgin to work with Sir James Grant.[4]

He returned to Edinburgh in 1789 to oversee the building of Old College for Robert Adam. His business connection to Adam ended in 1791, whereafter he opened an office at 2 North Bridge. In 1820 he apprenticed Anthony Salvin.

The original concept for a road on the line of what is now Waterloo Place in Edinburgh was mooted by Paterson as early as 1790.[5]

Just before death he is listed as living at 24 Buccleuch Place in Edinburgh's south side, just south of George Square.[6]

Principal works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Seton House Castle". Thesetonfamily.com:8080. Retrieved 2016-09-25. 
  2. ^ Ronert and James Adam: Designs for Castles and Country Houses. Alistair Rowan, Phaidon, Oxford. 1985.
  3. ^ David Goold. "Dictionary of Scottish Architects - DSA Architect Biography Report (September 25, 2016, 1:55 pm)". Scottisharchitects.org.uk. Retrieved 2016-09-25. 
  4. ^ David Goold. "Dictionary of Scottish Architects - DSA Architect Biography Report (September 25, 2016, 1:55 pm)". Scottisharchitects.org.uk. Retrieved 2016-09-25. 
  5. ^ a b Gifford McWilliam; Walker (1984). Buildings of Scotland: Edinburgh. Pevsner Architectural Guides. ISBN 978-0140710687. 
  6. ^ "(183) - Scottish Post Office Directories > Towns > Edinburgh > 1805-1834 - Post Office annual directory > 1832-1833 - Scottish Directories - National Library of Scotland". Digital.nls.uk. Retrieved 2016-09-25.