Jonathan Torgovnik

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Jonathan Torgovnik (born 1969) is an Israeli photographer and photojournalist.[1][2] He lives in Johannesburg, in South Africa.[3] He spent two years in Rwanda photographing women who had been systematically raped during the Rwandan genocide in 1994, and of the children born from those rapes. The photographs and the story were published in the Daily Telegraph magazine in 2007. A charity, Foundation Rwanda, was founded as a result.[4] In 2014, Torgovnik returned to Rwanda.[5] In 2015 he documented the lives of migrants who have moved, many of them illegally, to South Africa from other African countries such as Tanzania, Zimbabwe and Malawi.[3]

Life and work[edit]

In 2006, Torgovnik was commissioned by Newsweek to document the effects of twenty-five years of AIDS in Africa.[6] While in Rwanda, he met Tutsi women who had been victims of systematic rape during the Rwandan genocide in 1994, many of whom had contracted AIDS, and many of whom had children fathered by the rapists. His photographs of these women were published in Stern and in the Daily Telegraph magazine in 2007. In the same year, one of them, a portrait of "Joseline Ingabire with her daughter Leah Batamuliza, Rwanda", won the Photographic Portrait Prize of the National Portrait Gallery in London.[1] The photographs were published as a book, Intended Consequences: Rwandan Children Born of Rape, in 2009. In 2012 they won Torgovnik the Prix Découverte, the highest prize at the annual Rencontres d'Arles photography festival in Arles, in Provence in southern France.[2][7]

Reception[edit]

  • Getty Grant for Editorial Photography, 2016 - African migrants in Johannesburg
  • Prix découverte d'arles 2012 - Discovery Award at the Rencontres d’Arles festival, Arles, France - Intended Consequences
  • PDN: 2010 Annual Competition - Aftermath of the Haiti Earthquake, originally shot for CNN.[8]
  • PDN: 2010 Annual Competition - Intended Consequences (Aperture 2009) [9]
  • duPont Journalism Award 2010, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism - Intended Consequences [10]
  • American Photography Award - Intended Consequences (Aperture 2009) [11]
  • Emmy nomination 2009 - Intended Consequences (produced by MediaStorm) [12]
  • World Press Photo Award 2009 - Amato Opera in New York, originally commissioned by German Geo Magazine [13]
  • National Portrait Gallery Prize 2007 - Intended Consequences[14][15]
  • Open Society Institute Fellowship Distribution Grant 2007 - Intended Consequences [16]
  • Getty Images Grant for Editorial photography, 2007 - Intended Consequences [17]
  • New York University, Arthur L. Carer Journalism Institute: Nomination - Intended Consequences [18]

Books[edit]

  • Intended Consequences: Rwandan Children Born of Rape (Aperture, 2009)[19]
  • Bollywood Dreams: An Exploration of the Motion Picture Industry and its Culture in India (Phaidon, 2003) [20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Photographic Portrait Prize 2007. London: National Portrait Gallery. Accessed May 2017.
  2. ^ a b Valérie Duponchelle (10 July 2012). Arles: les enfants du génocide rwandais primés (in French). Le Figaro. Accessed May 2017.
  3. ^ a b Olivier Laurent (12 January 2016). The 'Hijacked' Life of Migrants in Johannesburg. Time. Accessed May 2017.
  4. ^ [s.n.] (2014). Rwanda: Intended Consequences, photographs by Jonathan Torgovnik. London: The Daily Telegraph. Accessed May 2017.
  5. ^ [s.n.] (14 June 2014). Changing Lives: Rwanda. London: The Daily Telegraph. Accessed May 2017.
  6. ^ Michael Streck (2 March 2007). Kinder in Ruanda: Mein Kind ist das Kind meines Feindes (in German). Stern. Accessed May 2017.
  7. ^ Sean O'Hagan (9 July 2012). Torgovnik's powerful portraits from Rwanda take top prize at Arles. The Guardian. Accessed May 2017.
  8. ^ "PDN Photo Annual 2010". Worldphoto.org. 10 May 2010. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  9. ^ "Photographers Making a Difference". Pdnonline.com. 2 September 2009. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  10. ^ "2010 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award Winners Announced". Journalism.columbia.edu. 14 January 2010. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  11. ^ "Canon Professional Network - Jonathan Torgovnik". Cpn.canon-europe.com. 3 November 2009. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  12. ^ "The Emmy Awards - 30th Annual News & Documentary Emmy Awards". Emmyonline.tv. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  13. ^ "Opera Chic: Amato Opera Images by Jonathan Torgovnik Win 3rd Place @ World Press Photo". Operachic.typepad.com. 13 February 2009. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  14. ^ Princeton University. "Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs | Intended Consequences: Rwandan Children Born of Rape". Wws.princeton.edu. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  15. ^ "Torgovnik, Jonathan. Intended Consequences: Rwandan Children Born of Rape (Aperture, 2009) » Black Photographers Book Reviews - Information & discussion about African diaspora photographers and publishing". 81press.net. 22 February 1999. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  16. ^ "Jonathan Torgovnik | Open Society Institute". Soros.org. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  17. ^ "Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography". Corporate.gettyimages.com. 2 September 1969. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  18. ^ Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. "The Top Ten Works of Journalism of the Decade, 2000-2009". Journalism.nyu.edu. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  19. ^ Intended Consequences. "Jonathan Torgovnik | Intended Consequences". Aperture.org. Retrieved 11 July 2010. 
  20. ^ "Bollywood Dreams | Photography | Phaidon Store". Phaidon.com. Retrieved 11 July 2010.