Judith Young

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Judith Young
Judith Young 100m fly silver.jpg
Judith Young at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics showing her silver medal won in the 100 m butterfly
Personal information
Nationality  Australia
Born 16 January 1966
Melbourne, Victoria

Judith Joan Young (born 16 January 1966)[1] is an Australian Paralympic swimmer. She was born in Melbourne.[1] Young, who has a birth defect in her arm, was one of the first people to receive an Australian Institute of Sport Athletes with a Disability residential scholarship, from 1993 to 1996.[2] She was coached by Peter Freney with assistance from Jim Fowlie.[citation needed]

At the 1988 Seoul Games, she won two gold medals in the Women’s 100 m Backstroke A8 and Women’s 400 m Freestyle A8 events and three silver medals in the Women’s 100 m Butterfly L6, Women’s 100 m Breaststroke A8 and Women’s 200 m Individual Medley L6 events.[3] At the Games, Young faced a protest over her below the elbow amputee classification because of the degree of use she received from her birth defect arm. The appeal was successful and Young was classified as les autres. She was allowed to keep her three A8 medals but the two world records set were nullified.[4]

Young won two gold medals, three silver medals and a bronze medal at the 1990 World Championships and Games for the Disabled in Assen, the Netherlands.[5]

At the 1992 Barcelona Games, Young won a silver medal in the Women’s 50 m Freestyle S10 event and two bronze medals in the Women's 100 m Butterfly S10 and Women's 200 Individual Medley SM10 events. She competed in four other events.[3] At the 1996 Atlanta Games, she won three silver medals in the Women's 100 m Breaststroke SB10, Women's 100 m Butterfly S10 and Women's 50 m Freestyle S10 events and a bronze medal in the Women's 100 m Backstroke S10 event.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Xth Paralympic Games Atlanta U.S.A. August 15-25 1996 : Australia : team handbook. Sydney: Australian Paralympic Federation. 1996. 
  2. ^ Australian Institute of Sport Athletes with a Disability 1993 (Brochure). Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. 1993. 
  3. ^ a b c "Judith Young". International Paralympic Committee Historical Results Database. Retrieved 13 February 2012. 
  4. ^ "Sprinter wins gold despite surgery". The Age. 20 October 1988. Retrieved 13 February 2012. 
  5. ^ World Championships and Games for the Disabled - Swimming Results. Netherlands: Organising Committee. 1990.