Julius Seligson

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Julius "Julie" Seligson
Country (sports) United States
BornDecember 22, 1909
New York City, NY
DiedOctober 13, 1987(1987-10-13) (aged 77)
CollegeLehigh University
Singles
Highest rankingNo. 8 in USTA Singles (1928)

Julius "Julie" Seligson (December 22, 1909, in New York City – October 13, 1987) was an American tennis player in the early part of the 20th century.

Seligson was ranked as high as # 8 in USTA Singles in 1928.[1] In 1928 he won the NCAA Men's Tennis Championship in singles. He was inducted into the Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) Men’s Collegiate Tennis Hall of Fame.

Early and personal life[edit]

Seligson was born in New York City, New York, and was Jewish, and experienced anti-Semitism in tennis.[2][3][4][5] He attended Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School.[4]

In 1937 he married Gertrude "Gerry" Seligson (nee Goodman).[6] They lived in Westport, Connecticut, from 1948 on.[7][6]

Tennis career[edit]

As a junior he was the national boy's 18-and-under champion in 1925 and 1926.[7] In 1927 he won the Eastern Grass Court Championships.

He played collegiate tennis at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in 1930.[3][8] Seligson never lost a regular season match.[8] In 1928 he won the NCAA Men's Tennis Championship in singles, beating Ben Gorchakoff 6–1, 6–1, 6–1, to become Lehigh’s first individual national champion.[9][8] [2] He won 66 straight matches, before losing in the 1930 NCAA finals 6–3, 3–6, 6–2, 8–6 to Cliff Sutter of Tulane.[8][7]

He won the NCAA indoor singles championship in 1928, 1929, and 1930.[8] In 1930 he also won the Eastern Clay Court Championships.[10]

Seligson was ranked as high as # 8 in USTA Singles in 1928.[1]

In 1928 and 1930, he was a singles finalist at the U.S. National Indoor Tennis Championships. In 1929, at the Cincinnati Masters, he reached the singles final, where he lost to Herbert Bowman in four sets: 6–2, 4–6, 4–6, 1–6.

He later turned professional and won three titles at the Metropolitan Clay Court Championship.[8]

Halls of Fame[edit]

In 1992, he was inducted into the Lehigh University Athletic Hall of Fame, and in 2002 he was enshrined into the Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) Men’s Collegiate Tennis Hall of Fame.[8][11]

After tennis career[edit]

After graduation he became an insurance broker.[10]

Seligson died in 1987 of a malignant melanoma at his home in Westport, Connecticut. He was 77 years old.[12][8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b American Hebrew and Jewish Tribune
  2. ^ a b Seligson, Julie : Jews In Sports @ Virtual Museum
  3. ^ a b Day by Day in Jewish Sports History - Bob Wechsler
  4. ^ a b Sporting Gentlemen: Men's Tennis from the Age of Honor to the Cult of the ... - E. Digby Baltzell
  5. ^ Encyclopedia of Jews in Sports - Bernard Postal, Jesse Silver, Roy Silver
  6. ^ a b Gertrude “Gerry” Seligson, 95 | WestportNow.com, Westport, CT
  7. ^ a b c "JULIUS SELIGSON" - The New York Times
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Lehigh Athletics
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 12, 2005. Retrieved 2007-02-21.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ a b Lehigh - Julius Seligson
  11. ^ Rick Leach To Be Inducted To ITA Hall Of Fame - University of Southern California Official Athletic Site
  12. ^ "Julius Seligson obituary". The New York Times. October 14, 1987. Retrieved April 18, 2015.

External links[edit]