Just for Love

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Just for Love[1]
Quicksilver Messenger Service - Just for Love.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedAugust 1970
RecordedMay – June 1970
GenrePsychedelic rock, acid rock
Length39:50
LabelCapitol
ProducerJohn Palladino
Quicksilver Messenger Service chronology
Shady Grove
(1969)
Just for Love[1]
(1970)
What About Me
(1970)

Just for Love is the fourth album by American psychedelic rock band Quicksilver Messenger Service. Released in August 1970, it marks the culmination of a transition from the extended, blues- and jazz-inspired improvisations of their first two albums to a more traditional rock sound. Founding member Dino Valenti, who returned to the band after a stint in prison on drug charges, was largely responsible for the new sound. Valenti's influence is readily apparent throughout; he composed eight of the album's nine tracks under the pen name Jesse Oris Farrow. Despite the marked change in the band's sound, it was their third straight album to reach the Top 30 on the Billboard charts, peaking at number 27. The only single culled from the album, "Fresh Air", became the band's biggest hit, reaching number 49.

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic3/5 stars[2]
Christgau's Record GuideB–[3]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Jesse Oris Farrow, except where noted.

Side one
  1. "Wolf Run (Part 1)" – 1:12
  2. "Just for Love (Part 1)" – 3:00
  3. "Cobra" (John Cipollina) – 4:23
  4. "The Hat" – 10:36
Side two
  1. "Freeway Flyer" – 3:49
  2. "Gone Again" – 7:17
  3. "Fresh Air" – 5:21
  4. "Just for Love (Part 2)" – 1:38
  5. "Wolf Run (Part 2)" – 2:10

Personnel[edit]

Charts[edit]

Album

Year Chart Position
1970 Billboard Pop Albums 27

Single

Year Single Chart Position
1970 "Fresh Air" Billboard Pop Singles 49[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cover – Michael Cantrell
  2. ^ Ruhlman, William. "Just for Love > Review". Allmusic. Retrieved August 29, 2011.
  3. ^ Christgau, Robert (1981). "Consumer Guide '70s: Q". Christgau's Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies. Ticknor & Fields. ISBN 089919026X. Retrieved March 10, 2019 – via robertchristgau.com.
  4. ^ "Quicksilver Messenger Service chart history". Billboard.com. Retrieved 25 August 2017.