Kamat

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Kamath/Kamat
Family name
Meaning toponymic; literally "cultivator, cultivation, cultivated land"
Region of origin India
Language(s) of origin Sanskrit

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Kāmath (many write as "Kamat") is a surname from Goa and Karnataka, Kerala and some parts of coastal Maharashtra in India. It is found among Hindus of the Goud Saraswat Brahmin, North Kanara Goud Saraswat Brahmin, Saraswat and Rajapur Saraswat Brahmin community.[1]

Variations[edit]

Kāmat is a common surname of Konkani Saraswat Brahmins and of a few Konkani Roman Catholics of Goa, Maharashtra and Canara. "Kāmat" is mostly used in the Konkan area which includes Goa, Maharashtra and around the Uttara Kannada district in Karnataka. Kāmath is used by Brahmins around Dakshina Kannada and Udupi districts and of Karnataka and Hosdurg in Kerala. The word has origin in the sanskrit word of "Kāmati" (i.e. Kaam + Maati) meaning "people who work in soil" or do farming or cultivate land. "Camotim" was used in the erstwhile Portuguese territory of Goa but has given way to "Kāmat" today.[2] "Camat" word is still in use in Indonesia which was a Portuguese colony at some point of time in the history. In Indonesia "Camat" means administrative and political head of the sub-district or taluk. Taluk may be said as kecamatan (spelled as ke-chamatan). The name is also in use among some Konkani Catholics who trace their ancestry to the Goud Saraswat Brahmins of Goa.[3]

There are many GSB and RSB families, original "Kāmats" from Goa who migrated to Karnataka and Maharashtra in the 16th Century during the Portuguese rule and they adopted the place name from Goa where they originally belonged to.

Notable people[edit]

The following is a list of notable people with last name Kāmath/Kāmat.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Kamath Family History". Oxford University Press. Dictionary of American Family Names ©2013, Oxford University Press. 
  2. ^ Saradesāya 2000, p. 24
  3. ^ Sarasvati's Children: A History of the Mangalorean Christians, Alan Machado Prabhu, I.J.A. Publications, 1999, p. 137
  4. ^ Riya Chakravarty (May 3, 2013). "Indian cinema@100: First women on screen: Durgabai Kamat and her daughter Kamlabai Ghokhle". NDTV. Retrieved May 9, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Vikram Gokhale has an illustrious family lineage". The Times of India. Jan 23, 2013. Retrieved May 9, 2013. 

References[edit]