Kamin-Kashyrskyi

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Kamin-Kashyrskyi
City
District administration in Kamin-Kashyrskyi
District administration in Kamin-Kashyrskyi
Flag of Kamin-Kashyrskyi
Flag
Coat of arms of Kamin-Kashyrskyi
Coat of arms
Kamin-Kashyrskyi is located in Ukraine
Kamin-Kashyrskyi
Kamin-Kashyrskyi
Coordinates: 51°37′12″N 24°57′55″E / 51.62000°N 24.96528°E / 51.62000; 24.96528Coordinates: 51°37′12″N 24°57′55″E / 51.62000°N 24.96528°E / 51.62000; 24.96528
Country Ukraine
Oblast (province) Volyn
Raion (district) Kamin-Kashyrskyi
Government
 • Mayor Vasyl Bondar
Elevation 155 m (509 ft)
Population (2015)
 • Total 12,330

Kamin-Kashyrskyi (Ukrainian: Камінь-Каширський, Polish: Kamień Koszyrski, Russian: Камень-Каширский) is a town in Volyn Oblast, Ukraine. It is the administrative center of Kamin-Kashyrskyi Raion. Population: 12,330 (2015 est.)[1]

History[edit]

It was part of Second Polish Republic between 1920 and 1939 was a powiat center in Polesie Voivodeship.

Just prior to the outbreak of World War II on September I, 1939, it is estimated that more than 2000 Jews lived in the town. On August 1, 1941, a squadron of the 2nd Cavalry Regiment arrived in the town from Ratno. One day later, they arrested and shot 8 male Jews. On August 22, 1941, a detachment of the Security Police subordinated to Einsatzgruppe C arrested all Jewish males aged between 16 and 60. The next day, they shot 80 male Jews in a forest 5 kilometers west of the town. In the fall of 1941, the Jews were ordered to inhabit an “open ghetto” but in March 1942, this ghetto, by the order of the Gebietskommissar, became an “enclosed ghetto”. Altogether, 2 300 Jews resided in the ghetto area. The first mass action was perpetrated on August 10, 1942, by the German Security Police from Brzesc with the assistance of the local German Gendarmerie and the Ukrainian Auxiliary Police. Some 50 families were shot in the Jewish cemetery as well as 130 Gypsies. On November 2, 1942, 400 Jews escaped from the ghetto. Most of the Jews soon died of starvation or disease in the forest.[2]

References[edit]