Kareldi

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The Kareldi were one or two indigenous Australian people of the state of Queensland. There were two groups that went by this name, the Garandi (Karandi) and the Kuthant (Kutanda, Gkuthaarn). It's not clear if they constituted a single people or spoke the same language.[1][2]

Country[edit]

The Kareldi held, in Tindale's estimation, some 1,500 square miles (3,900 km2) of land, extending over the mouth of the Norman River and westwards from Normanton to the Flinders River. Their domain included Karumba and the Swinburne River. Their inland extension went as far as Milgarra, Maggieville, and Stirling.[3]

Alternative names[edit]

  • Karundi, Karunti, Kurandi, Karantee, Karrandi, Karrandee.
  • Gar-und-yih
  • Kanin. (kanin means 'scrub,')
  • Gooran. (scrub people)
  • Kotanda.
  • Kutanda.
  • Goothanto.[3]

Some words[edit]

  • irruag. (tame dog)
  • nyet. (father)
  • mooruk. (mother)
  • morbuy. (whiteman).[4]

Notes[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ G31 Gkuthaarn at the Australian Indigenous Languages Database, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
  2. ^ G32 Garandi at the Australian Indigenous Languages Database, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
  3. ^ a b Tindale 1974, p. 174.
  4. ^ Armit 1886, p. 308.

Sources[edit]

  • Armit, W. E. (1886). "Mouth of the Norman" (PDF). In Curr, Edward Micklethwaite (ed.). The Australian race: its origin, languages, customs, place of landing in Australia and the routes by which it spread itself over the continent. Volume 2. Melbourne: J. Ferres. pp. 306–309.
  • Palmer, Edward (1884). "Notes on some Australian tribes". Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. 13: 276–347. JSTOR 2841896.
  • Sharp, R. Lauriston (March 1939). "Tribes and Totemism in North-East Australia". Oceania. Sydney. 9 (3): 254–275. JSTOR 40327744.
  • Tindale, Norman Barnett (1974). "Kareldi (QLD)". Aboriginal Tribes of Australia: Their Terrain, Environmental Controls, Distribution, Limits, and Proper Names. Australian National University Press.