Kent McClard

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Kent McClard (born c. 1968) is a record label owner and zine publisher from Goleta, California. His work has been a prominent and influential presence in the DIY hardcore and punk scenes.

Early life[edit]

Kent McClard was born circa 1968.[1][2] He grew up in a "broken home" and describes himself as a troublesome child. As a teenager, he discovered hardcore punk and both its freedom and specific ethics influenced him deeply and helped to "define" his life.[3] From then on, he began several DIY enterprises, including the first show and the first fanzine of his town.[3]

McClard has been straight edge since approximately 1984.[2]

Ebullition Records[edit]

In early 1990, the former Maximumrocknroll columnist started Ebullition Records with contributions from Sonia Skindrud (writer of the zine Exedra) and Brent Stephens (member of Downcast). Skindrud came up with the name and Stephens drew the logo, but the label is primarily run by McClard.

Los Angeles hardcore band Inside Out was meant to record an LP as the first Ebullition release. However, Revelation Records asked them to release a 7" instead, and the band chose the more established label. The record was not released for another year, after the band had broken up. Inside Out did plan to do a second record called "Rage Against the Machine", which was a phrase Kent coined in some writings he did in issue #9 of the zine No Answers.[4] They never managed to finish this second release and singer Zack de La Rocha ended up using the phrase himself, dubbing his next band Rage Against the Machine. Ebullition's first release came out in late 1990. Kent had been doing No Answers zine since 1983 and the ninth issue came with the Downcast 7" (Ebullition #1). Ebullition released 3,000 copies of No Answers #9 with the Downcast 7" and after those were sold the zine and 7" became separate products.

The label released music by the bands: Admiral, Amber Inn, Ampere, Bread and Circuits, Downcast, Econochrist, Floodgate, Iconoclast, Jara, Los Crudos, Spitboy, Manrae, Moss Icon, Orchid, Policy of 3, Portraits of Past, Reversal of Man, Seein' Red, Severed Head of State, Still Life, Struggle, Submission Hold, This Machine Kills, Torches To Rome, Yage, and Yaphet Kotto.

HeartattaCk[edit]

HeartattaCk was an internationally distributed[5] punk zine,[6] along the lines of Punk Planet and Maximumrocknroll with a strong bent towards hardcore punk and anti-consumerism. It was published by Kent McClard and Lisa Oglesby from March 1994 through June 2006.[5][7] In the final years of its publication it remained one of the most popular zines available.[8] O'Connor describes it as "one of half a dozen major punk fanzines in the USA during the 1990s."[9]

Its main characteristic was traditionally seen as its refusal to review anything that has a UPC label, considering that to be a mark of consumerism. Some have felt that this has intentionally marginalized the possible reach this zine could have.[citation needed] Nonetheless, the magazine became a presence in the underground music scene, and a champion of the DIY movement.

HeartattaCk published its 50th and final issue on June 30, 2006.[10] A number of contributors have created a new zine in the same spirit under the name Give Me Back.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kent McClard Interview". Armed with Anger. No. 5. Bradford, England. Spring 1998. Archived from the original on November 6, 2003. Retrieved March 23, 2018. 
  2. ^ a b McClard, Kent. "V/A - Illiterate LP". Ebullition.com. Archived from the original on June 5, 2000. Retrieved March 24, 2018. 
  3. ^ a b Kirchner, Michael; Pierschel, Marc (October 3, 2009). Edge. Goleta, California: Compassion Media. Event occurs at 24:23-30:06. 
  4. ^ McClard, Kent. "Ebullition History:". Ebullition.com. Retrieved March 23, 2018.  Note: includes comments regarding Rage Against the Machine
  5. ^ a b "HeartattaCk #20 out now!". Archived from the original on December 5, 1998. Retrieved March 24, 2018.  Notes on distribution and back issues.
  6. ^ Curry, Arwen (February 5, 1998). "Notes from the Underground". Metro Santa Cruz. Retrieved March 23, 2018. 
  7. ^ "Cover art and summaries of back issues". Interpunk.com. Archived from the original on January 21, 2008. Retrieved March 24, 2018. 
  8. ^ The Zine Yearbook: An Annual Collection of Excerpts from the Best Zines Publishing Today, Vol 7, Jason Kucsma and Jen Angel, Soft Skull Press, Brooklyn, NY, 2003. The introduction explains that the yearbook only accepts material from zines with a distribution of less than 5,000. It goes on to note: "Some of the most popular zines like Bitch, Heart attaCk, and Dishwasher, exceed the circulation limit."
  9. ^ O'Connor, Alan (March–April 2007). "Sociology of Youth Subcultures". Canadian Journal of Sociology. Archived from the original on August 20, 2007. Retrieved March 24, 2018. 
  10. ^ McClard, Kent. "Announcement of 50th and final issue". Ebullition.com. Retrieved March 24, 2018. 
  11. ^ givemeback.org site for group that states, "...we're continuing heartattack with a new name and address."

External links[edit]