Larry Woodall

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Larry Woodall
Larry Woodall baseball card.jpg
Catcher
Born: (1894-07-26)July 26, 1894
Staunton, Virginia
Died: May 16, 1963(1963-05-16) (aged 68)
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 20, 1920, for the Detroit Tigers
Last MLB appearance
May 9, 1929, for the Detroit Tigers
MLB statistics
Batting average .268
Home runs 1
Runs batted in 161
Teams

Charles Lawrence "Larry" Woodall (July 26, 1894 – May 16, 1963) was a professional baseball player. He played ten seasons in Major League Baseball, all in the American League with the Detroit Tigers (1920–29), primarily as a catcher.

Life[edit]

Born in Staunton, Virginia, he attended Wake Forest University and the University of North Carolina.

Career[edit]

During most of Woodall's playing career, he played behind two starting catchers of the Tigers, Johnny Bassler and Oscar Stanage. For one season in 1927, however, he played a career-high 86 games at catcher during manager George Moriarty's first season. Woodall posted a .997 fielding percentage (committing one error), the best percentage among all starting catchers that season. He hit over .300 in three seasons and had a career batting average of .268 in 548 games. Woodall batted and threw right-handed.

After his major league career was over, Woodall played ten seasons in the Pacific Coast League. In 1930–31, he played for the Portland Beavers, including a stint as player-manager in 1930. He played for the Sacramento Senators in 1932–33, then played six seasons with the San Francisco Seals from 1934–39.

Woodall's post-playing career included stints as a manager in the Pacific Coast League, then more than two decades with the Boston Red Sox, as a coach (1942–48, including service on Boston's 1946 pennant-winning team), director of public relations, and scout. In 1949, he scouted Willie Mays but reported that Mays "was not the Red Sox' type of player."[1] Woodall remained a Red Sox employee until his death at age 68 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ James, Bill (2001). The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. The Free Press. p. 205.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Moe Berg
Boston Red Sox first-base coach
1942–1947
Succeeded by
Earle Combs