Latham 43

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Latham 42 and 43
Latham 43 HB3 MDLot zoln.jpg
Role Flying boat bomber
National origin France
Manufacturer Latham
First flight 1924
Primary user Aéronavale
Number built 28

The Latham 43 was a flying boat bomber built in France in the 1920s for service with the French Navy. It was a conventional design for its day - a two-bay biplane with unstaggered wings, and engines mounted tractor-fashion on struts in the interplane gap. The pilot sat in an open cockpit, with a gunner in an open bow position, and another in an open position amidships.

Two examples, designated Latham 42 powered by liquid-cooled Vee engines were evaluated by the navy in 1924, leading to a contract for 18 aircraft powered by air-cooled radial engines instead. Designated Latham 43 by the manufacturer and HB.3 in naval service (for Hydravion de bombardement - "Seaplane-bomber", 3 seats), they remained in service between 1926 and 1929.

Eight other machines with the original liquid-cooled engine were sold to Poland.


Variants[edit]

  • prototypes with Lorraine 12Da engines (2 built)
  • production version for France with Gnome et Rhône 9Aa engines (18 built)
  • production version for Poland with Lorraine engines (8 built)

Operators[edit]

 France
 Poland

Specifications (French production version)[edit]

General characteristics

  • Crew: Three
  • Length: 15.60 m (61 ft 2 in)
  • Wingspan: 22.50 m (73 ft 10 in)
  • Height: 5.40 m (17 ft 9 in)
  • Wing area: 125 m2 (1,345 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 3,460 kg (7,610 lb)
  • Gross weight: 5,390 kg (11,860 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Gnome et Rhône 9Aa, 280 kW (380 hp) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 160 km/h (100 mph)
  • Range: 800 km (500 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 4,600 m (15,100 ft)

Armament

  • 1 × trainable .303 machine gun in open position in bow
  • 1 × trainable .303 machine gun in open position amidships
  • 400 kg (880 lb) of bombs

See also[edit]

Related lists

References[edit]

  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 568. 
  • World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 900 Sheet 2. 
  • aviafrance.com