Lee Mullican

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Lee Mullican
Lee Mullican.jpg
Lee Mullican (1970) in his Santa Monica residence
Born(1919-12-02)December 2, 1919
Died(1998-07-07)July 7, 1998
NationalityAmerican
Alma materAbilene Christian University,
Kansas City Art Institute,
University of Oklahoma
Known forPainting, drawings
MovementDynaton, Surrealism
Spouse(s)Luchita Hurtado
Children2, including Matt Mullican

Lee Mullican (December 2, 1919 – July 8, 1998) was an American painter, curator, and art teacher.[1][2] He was an influential member of the Dynaton Movement.[3][4]

Early life and education[edit]

Lee Mullican was born on December 2, 1919 in Chickasha, Oklahoma.[1] He studied at the Abilene Christian University in Texas, the University of Oklahoma, and the Kansas City Art Institute.[1]

During World War II, he was in the United States Army and served in Hawaii.[1]

Career and late life[edit]

He moved to San Francisco after the war in 1947.[1] Mullican was part of a 1951 exhibition called "Dynaton" held at the San Francisco Museum of Art.[5] Mullican was a member of the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture faculty from 1962 to 1990.[6]

His paintings were abstract and have a "rigid" and "linear" quality to them.[7] He applied paint with a printer's knife.[7] Mullicans work was influenced by cosmology, which is also a trait found in other Dynaton artists work.[8]

Mullican married artist Luchita Hurtado and they had two sons.[9] Their son Matt Mullican is an artist; and their son John Mullican is a writer and director.[9] He died on July 8, 1998 in Santa Monica, California.[1] In 2008, his son John Mullican released the documentary film, Finding Lee Mullican.[10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Oliver, Myrna (1998-07-08). "Lee Mullican; Influential Surrealist Artist". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2022-01-19.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. ^ "Review: Lee Mullican's colors crackle with energy". Los Angeles Times. 2014-11-03. Retrieved 2022-01-20.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ Kimball Whiting. "Lee Mullican (1919-1998)". sullivangoss.com. Retrieved 2011-06-09.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link).
  4. ^ Whiting, Sam (January 21, 2021). "Gertrud Parker, artist and founder of Museum of Craft and Folk Art, dead at 96". Datebook | San Francisco Arts & Entertainment Guide. Retrieved 2022-01-20.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ "Art and soul : Internationally known Taos artist Lee Mullican dies". Taos News. July 16, 1998.
  6. ^ "UCLA Obituary: Lee Mullican". Retrieved 2011-06-09.
  7. ^ a b Yau, John (2016-06-12). "Restless and Rigid". Hyperallergic. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  8. ^ Schwendener, Martha (2015-07-16). "Review: 'All Watched Over' Contemplates Art's Relationship to Technology". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-01-20.
  9. ^ a b Rea, Naomi (2020-08-14). "'Her Legacy Has Only Just Begun': Luchita Hurtado, the Protean Artist Who Gained Renown in Her Final Decade, Has Died at 99". Artnet News. Retrieved 2022-01-19.
  10. ^ Heffley, Lynne (2005-11-13). "The Patron of Their Arts". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2022-01-20.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ "Remembering Luchita Hurtado, painter, eco-warrior and witness to a century of art". The Art Newspaper. 2020-09-04. Retrieved 2022-01-20.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]