Legal doublet

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A legal doublet is a standardized phrase used frequently in English legal language consisting of two or more words that are near synonyms. The origin of the doubling—and sometimes even tripling—often lies in the transition of legal language from Latin to French. Certain words were simply given in their Latin or French forms and paired with an English—or a more archaic Anglo-Saxon—synonym in order to ensure understanding. Such phrases can often be pleonasms.[1]

List of common legal doublets[edit]

List of common legal triplets[edit]

  • cancel, annul and set aside[1]
  • convey, transfer and set over[1]
  • give, devise and bequeath[1]
  • grant, bargain, sell[1]
  • name, constitute and appoint[1]
  • ordered, adjudged and decreed[2]
  • remise, release and forever quit claim[1]
  • rest, residue and remainder[1]
  • right, title and interest[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am Espenschied, Lenné Eidson (2010). "10.1 Eliminate clutter and redundant language § Eliminate common doublets and triplets". Contract Drafting: Powerful Prose in Transactional Practice. ABA Fundamentals. Chicago: American Bar Association. pp. 164–165. ISBN 978-1-60442-795-0. LCCN 2010003298. OCLC 505017586. OL 15443452W. 
  2. ^ a b Ingels, Mia B. (2006). "2.2.1.3. Doublets and triplets". Legal English Communication Skills. Learning English. Leuven, Belgium: Academische Coöperatieve Vennootschap. pp. 60–61. ISBN 90-334-6112-9. OCLC 150389897. 
  3. ^ "Doublets". TransLegal. 12 January 2010. Archived from the original on 8 September 2013. 
  4. ^ Garner, Bryan A. (2011). Garner's Dictionary of Legal Usage. Rev. ed. of: A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage (3rd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 577. ISBN 978-0-19-538420-8. LCCN 2011004242. OCLC 671709669. OL 24973858M.