Leo E. Litwak

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Leo E. Litwak (May 28, 1924 – July 27, 2018) was an American short story writer and novelist.[1]

Life[edit]

He attended Wayne State University and Columbia University. He taught at San Francisco State University.[2] He was a medic in World War II, which was the subject of his 2001 memoir, The Medic: Life and Death in the Last Days of WWII.[3]

His work appeared in The New York Times,.[4] His papers are held at Washington University.[5]

Litwak's daughter is playwright Jessica Litwak. He had two granddaughters. He was the son of union leader Isaac Litwak, whose life was the basis of Leo Litwak's novel, Waiting for the News.[3]

Awards[edit]

Works[edit]

  • "The Eleventh Edition" TriQuarterly, No. 74, Winter 1989

Novels[edit]

  • To the Hanging Gardens (1964) Andre Deutsch
  • Waiting for the News (1969)

Non-fiction[edit]

  • College Days in Earthquake Country (1971)
  • Medic 2001

Anthologies[edit]

  • Leonard Michaels; David Reid; Raquel Scherr, eds. (1995). "Spirits". West of the West: imagining California : an anthology. University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-20164-4.
  • Jerome Charyn, ed. (1969). The single voice: an anthology of contemporary fiction. Collier Books.
  • Saul Bellow, ed. (1963). Great Jewish Short Stories. Dell. ISBN 9780440331223.

Criticism[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Leo Litwak, World War II combat medic turned English professor, dies at 94". San Francisco Chronicler. 28 July 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  2. ^ "Workman Publishing".
  3. ^ a b Whiting, Sam (July 28, 2018). "Leo Litwak, World War II combat medic turned English professor, dies at 94 Photo of Leo Litwak". Retrieved 15 September 2021.
  4. ^ "Hell's Angels; Reviewed by Leo E. Litwak". The New York Times. January 29, 1967. Retrieved 2012-11-20.
  5. ^ library.wustl.edu https://web.archive.org/web/20060901124514/http://library.wustl.edu/units/spec/manuscripts/mlc/litwak/litwak.html. Archived from the original on September 1, 2006. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ "Leo E. Litwak - John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation". Gf.org. Retrieved 2012-11-20.
  7. ^ "Past Winners". Jewish Book Council. Retrieved 2020-01-19.

External links[edit]