Leonard B. Chandler

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Leonard Blanchard Chandler
Leonard B. Chandler.png
Delegate to the
1917 Massachusetts Constitutional Convention[1]
Representing the
23rd Middlesex District of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives.[2]
In office
June 6, 1917 – August 13, 1919
Twelfth Mayor of
Somerville, Massachusetts
In office
January 4, 1904 – January 1, 1906
Preceded by Edward Glines[3]
Succeeded by Charles Arnold Grimmons
Member of the
Massachusetts Senate[1]
Third Middlesex District[4]
In office
1902–1903
Preceded by Franklin E. Huntress[5]
Succeeded by John M. Woods[6]
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives[1]
8th Middlesex District[7]
In office
1897–1899
Member of the
Somerville, Massachusetts
Board of Aldermen
Ward Three[8]
Personal details
Born August 29, 1851[1][9]
Princeton, Massachusetts[1][9]
Died November 9, 1927[10]
Somerville, Massachusetts[10]
Resting place Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett, Massachusetts
Nationality American
Political party Republican[1]
Spouse(s) Hattie Betsey Stuart, married on October 22, 1874.
Residence 45 Jaques St, Somerville, Massachusetts[10]
Occupation Milk Distributor[9]

Leonard Blanchard Chandler[11] (August 29, 1851 – November 9, 1927) was a Massachusetts businessman and politician who served in the 1917 Massachusetts Constitutional Convention, in both branches of the Massachusetts legislature, both branches of the city council and as the twelfth Mayor of Somerville, Massachusetts.[1]

Early life[edit]

Chandler as born August 29, 1851 to Leonard and Sarah (Blanchard) Chandler in Princeton, Massachusetts.[11][12]

Family life[edit]

Chandler married Hattie Betsey Stewart of Charlestown, Massachusetts[13] in Princeton, Massachusetts, on October 22, 1874. They had three children.[11]

1917 Massachusetts Constitutional Convention[edit]

In 1916 the Massachusetts legislature and electorate approved a calling of a Constitutional Convention.[14] In May 1917, Chandler was elected to serve as a member of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention of 1917, representing the 23rd Middlesex District of the Massachusetts House of Representatives.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1919), A Souvenir of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention, Boston, Stoughton, MA: A. M. (Arthur Milnor) Bridgman, p. 64. 
  2. ^ a b "Massachusetts Constitutional Convention", Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers: 10, 1919. 
  3. ^ City of Somerville, Massachusetts (1901), Municipal Manual of the City of Somerville, Massachusetts: published in the Year 1901, Somerville, MA: City of Somerville, Massachusetts, p. 204. 
  4. ^ Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1903), A Souvenir of Massachusetts Legislators Vol. XII, Stoughton, Ma: A. M. Bridgman, p. 137. 
  5. ^ Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1901), A Souvenir of Massachusetts legislators Vol. X, Stoughton, Ma: A. M. Bridgman, p. 137. 
  6. ^ Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1904), A Souvenir of Massachusetts legislators Vol. XIII, Stoughton, Ma: A. M. Bridgman, p. 129. 
  7. ^ Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1897), A Souvenir of Massachusetts legislators Vol. VI, Stoughton, Ma: A. M. Bridgman, p. 143. 
  8. ^ Samuels, Edward Augustus (1897), Somerville, Past and Present: An Illustrated Historical Souvenir, Boston, MA: Samuels and Kimball, p. 173. 
  9. ^ a b c Samuels, Edward Augustus (1897), Somerville, Past and Present: An Illustrated Historical Souvenir, Boston, MA: Samuels and Kimball, p. 508. 
  10. ^ a b c The Boston Globe (November 10, 1927), EX-MAYOR CHANDLER OF SOMERVILLE DEAD: Served Two Terms as City's Chief Executive, Boston, Massachusetts: Boston Globe, p. 10. 
  11. ^ a b c Hager, Lucie Caroline (1891), Boxborough: a New England Town and its People, Philadelphia, PA: J. W. Lewis & CO., p. 92. 
  12. ^ Conklin, Edwin P. (1927), Middlesex County and its people: a history, Volume 3, New York, NY: Lewis Historical Publishing, p. 227. 
  13. ^ Blake, Francis Everett (1915), History of the Town of Princeton, in the County of Worcester and Commonwealth of Massachusetts 1759-1915. Vol II, Printed in Boston, MA: Town of Princeton, p. 55 
  14. ^ "Massachusetts Constitutional Convention", Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Boston, MA: Wright & Potter printing co., state printers: 7–8, 1919. 
Political offices
Preceded by
Edward Glines
Mayor of Somerville, Massachusetts
January 4, 1904
to
January 1, 1906
Succeeded by
Charles Arnold Grimmons
Preceded by
Franklin E. Huntress
Massachusetts State Senator
Third Middlesex District

January 1902
to
January 1903
Succeeded by
John M. Woods