Let's Jump the Broomstick

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"Let's Jump the Broomstick"
Single by Brenda Lee
from the album Brenda Lee
B-side "Some of These Days"
Released April 1959
Genre Rockabilly
Length 2:25
Label Decca 30885
Songwriter(s) Charles Robins
Brenda Lee singles chronology
"Bill Bailey Won't You Please Come Home"
(1958)
"Let's Jump the Broomstick"
(1959)
"Sweet Nothin's"
(1959)
"Bill Bailey Won't You Please Come Home"
(1958)
"Let's Jump the Broomstick"
(1959)
"Sweet Nothin's"
(1959)

"Let's Jump the Broomstick" is a song written by Charles Robins and performed first by a black Nashville group, Alvin Gaines & The Themes, in 1959, then covered that year by Brenda Lee. Her version reached No.12 in the United Kingdom in 1961.[1] The song was featured on her 1960 album, Brenda Lee.[2] The song is based on the popular custom and phrase jumping the broom.

The song was arranged by Owen Bradley.[3]

Other versions[edit]

In media[edit]

  • The song was used for a lyp-synch contest on the October 4, 1963 episode of Ready Steady Go! (the first appearance of The Beatles - who had once been Brenda Lee's opening act on a UK tour[6]), judged by Paul McCartney, who chose 13-year-old Melanie Coe as the winner; a few years later, after Coe ran off with a boyfriend, her disappearance made the front page of the Daily Mirror, which would serve as McCartney's inspiration for "She's Leaving Home".

References[edit]

  1. ^ Guinness World Records, British Hit Singles and Albums, 17th Edition (2004)
  2. ^ "Brenda Lee - Brenda Lee (Vinyl, LP, Album)". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2016-08-29. 
  3. ^ "Brenda Lee - Let's Jump The Broomstick / Some Of These Days - Decca - USA - 9-30885". 45cat.com. 1959-04-27. Retrieved 2016-08-29. 
  4. ^ Mark Deming. "The North Star Grassman and the Ravens - Sandy Denny | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 2016-08-29. 
  5. ^ "Let's Jump the Broomstick (song by Coast to Coast) • Music VF, US & UK hits charts". Musicvf.com. 1981-05-23. Retrieved 2016-08-29. 
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-07-14. Retrieved 2012-02-03.