Lewisburg Area School District

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Lewisburg Area School District
Map of Union County Pennsylvania School Districts.png
Address
1951 Washington Avenue
Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, Union County 17837
United States
Information
Type Public
School board 9 locally elected members
Superintendent Dr. Steven C. Skalka, Salary $150,000 2017 3 year contract.[1]
Administrator

Mrs. Cathy Moser, Asst Super of Instruction and Pupil Personnel salary $96,605
Mr. John Fairchild, Director of Administrative Services[2]
Mr. Delbert Gallegos, Director of Buildings and Grounds
Mr. Daniel Schrader, Technology Coordinator

Mr. Kevin Oswald, Director of Food Services
Principal Chris Ruhl KES
Principal Jeremiah Bennett, LIS
Principal George Drozin, DEMS salary $82,000
Principal

Paula Reber, LAHS

Eric Wetzell, LAHS, vice principal
Staff 120 FTE (2011)[3]
Faculty 142 teachers 2012, 143.5 (2011)
Grades PreK-12 (2013)
Age Pre school for 4 year olds to 21 years special education
Pupils

1,945 pupils (2015)[4]
1,904 pupils (2014),[5]
1,884 pupils (2013)[6]
1,890 pupils 2011[7]
1,911 pupils 2010[8]
1,952 pupils 2009[9]

1,813 pupils 2006[10]
 • Kindergarten 134 (2014)[11] 127 (2012) 143 (2010), 133 (2006)
 • Grade 1 134 (2012), 157
 • Grade 2 159 (2012), 143
 • Grade 3 164 (2012), 126
 • Grade 4 141 (2012), 145
 • Grade 5 129 (2012), 159
 • Grade 6 141 (2012), 154
 • Grade 7 159 (2012), 138
 • Grade 8 143 (2012), 156
 • Grade 9 143 92012), 128
 • Grade 10 156 (2012), 141
 • Grade 11 124 (2012), 147
 • Grade 12 136 (2012), 154 (2010)
 • Grade 13 20
 • Other Enrollment projected to be 1,836 pupils in 2020[12]
Language English
Color(s) Green and White
Mascot Dragons
Endowment Green Dragon Foundation, Lewisburg Area High School Alumni Association
Budget

$33.3 million (2016-17)[13]
$31.6 million (2015-16)[14]
$30.3 million (2014-15)[15][16]
$29 million (2013-14)[17]
$28.3 million (2012-13)[18]

$27 million (2010-11)[19]
School fees $25 per sport or other activity
Per Pupil Spending 2008

$12,619 (2008)

$13,689.13 (2010)[20]
Website

The Lewisburg Area School District is a small, rural/suburban public school district in Union County, Pennsylvania. The District encompasses an area of approximately 44.5 square miles (115 km2). It serves the borough of Lewisburg, Kelly Township, East Buffalo Township and Union Township. By 2010, the District's population had increased to 19,173 people.[21] According to 2000 US Census Bureau data, it served a resident population of 17,279. The educational attainment levels for the Lewisburg Area School District population (25 years old and over) were 88% high school graduates and 34% college graduates.[22] The District is one of the 500 public school districts of Pennsylvania.

According to the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, 22.4% of the District's pupils lived at 185% or below the Federal Poverty Level [1] as shown by their eligibility for the federal free or reduced price school meal programs in 2012.[23] According to the US Census Bureau, the resident's 2010 annual per capita income was $19,981, while the Median Family Income was $56,587 a year.[24] In the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the median family income was $49,501[25] and the United States median family income was $49,445, in 2010.[26] By 2013, the median household income in the United States rose to $52,100.[27]

Per Lewisburg Area School District administration, during the 2005-06 school year, the District provided basic educational services to 1,813 pupils. The District employed: 7 administrators, 125 teachers, and 79 full-time and part-time support personnel. In school year 2009-10, the Lewisburg Area School District provided basic educational services to 1,890 pupils. In 2010, the District employed: 159 teachers, 101 full-time and part-time support personnel, and 10 administrators. Lewisburg Area School District received more than $6.2 million in state funding in school year 2009-10. The District enrollment was 2,078 pupils in 2011-12. Lewisburg Area School District employed: 154 teachers, 99 full-time and part-time support personnel, and ten (10) administrators during the 2011-12 school year. Lewisburg Area School District received $6,644,485 in state funding in the 2011-12 school year.

Special education programs are provided by the District and the staff of the Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit16. Occupational training and adult education in various vocational and technical fields are provided by the District and the SUN Area Technical Institute.

Lewisburg Area School District operates 4 schools: Kelly Elementary School, Linntown Intermediate School, Donald H. Eichhorn Middle School and Lewisburg Area High School.

Governance[edit]

The Lewisburg Area School District is governed by 9 individually elected board members (serve without compensation for a term of four years), the Pennsylvania State Board of Education, the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the Pennsylvania General Assembly.[28] The federal government controls programs it funds like: Title I funding for low income children in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and the No Child Left Behind Act, (renamed Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in December 2015) which mandates the district focus its resources on student success in acquiring reading and math skills.[29] The school board is required by state law to post a financial report on the district in its website by March of each school year.[30]

The Superintendent and Business Manager are appointed by the school board. The Superintendent is the chief administrative officer with overall responsibility for all aspects of operations, including education and finance. The Business Manager is responsible for budget and financial operations. Neither of these officials are voting members of the School Board. The School Board enters into individual employment contracts for these positions. In Pennsylvania, public school districts are required to give 150 days notice to the Superintendent regarding renewal of the employment contract.[31] Pursuant to Act 141 of 2012 which amended the Pennsylvania School Code, all school districts that have hired superintendents on/after the fall of 2012 are required to develop objective performance standards and post them on the district's website.[32]

Academic achievement[edit]

In 2016, Lewisburg Area School District ranked 21st out of 496 Pennsylvania public school districts, by the Pittsburgh Business Times.[33] The ranking is based on the last 3 years of student academic achievement as demonstrated by PSSAs results in: reading, writing, math and science and the three Keystone Exams (literature, Algebra 1, Biology I) in high school.[34] Three school districts were excluded because they do not operate high schools (Saint Clair Area School District, Midland Borough School District, Duquesne City School District). The PSSAs are given to all children in grades 3rd through 8th. Adapted PSSA examinations are given to children in the special education programs. Writing exams were given to children in 5th and 8th grades.

Overachievers ranking

In 2012, the Pittsburgh Business Times also reported an Overachievers Ranking for 498 Pennsylvania school districts. Lewisburg Area School District ranked 20th.[42] The editor describes the ranking as: "a ranking answers the question - which school districts do better than expectations based upon economics? This rank takes the Honor Roll rank and adds the percentage of students in the district eligible for free and reduced-price lunch into the formula. A district finishing high on this rank is smashing expectations, and any district above the median point is exceeding expectations."[43]

  • 2012 - 16th[44]
  • 2011 - 12th

In 2009, the academic achievement, of the students in the Lewisburg Area School District, was in the 90th percentile among all 500 Pennsylvania school districts Scale (0-99; 100 is state best)[45]

AYP status history[edit]

From 2003 through 2012, Lewisburg Area School District achieved Adequate Yearly progress (AYP) status under the federal No Child Left Behind Act each school year.[46][47] In 2011, 94 percent of the 500 Pennsylvania Public School Districts achieved the No Child Left Behind Act progress level of 72% of students reading on grade level and 67% of students demonstrating on grade level math. In 2011, 46.9 percent of Pennsylvania school districts achieved Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) based on student performance. An additional 37.8 percent of school districts made AYP based on a calculated method called safe harbor, 8.2 percent on the growth model and 0.8 percent on a two-year average performance.

Graduation rate[edit]

In 2016, Lewisburg Area School District's graduation rate was 95.9%.[48]

  • 2015 - 95%[49]
  • 2014 - 94.8%
  • 2013 - 95.86%
  • 2012 - 93%.[50]
  • 2011 - 97%.[51]
  • 2010 - 95%, the Pennsylvania Department of Education issued a new, 4-year cohort graduation rate.[52]

Former graduation rate:

High school[edit]

Lewisburg Area High School is located at 815 Market Street, Lewisburg. In 2013, enrollment was reported as 559 pupils in 9th through 12th grades, with 16% of pupils eligible for a free or reduced price lunch due to family poverty.[58] The administration reported that 8.5% of pupils were receiving special education services. Additionally, 11.6% of pupils were identified as being gifted. The school employed 39 teachers.[59] Per the PA Department of Education 100% of the teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2010, the school reported an enrollment of 620 pupils in grades 9th through 12th, with 112 pupils eligible for a federal free or reduced-price lunch. The school employed 43 teachers, yielding a student–teacher ratio of 14:1.[60] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[61]

2016 School Performance Profile

SPP 2016 – 78.8 out of 100 points. Lewisburg Area High School Keystone Exams mandated testing results were: 85.5% of students were on grade level in reading/literature and 82.8% of students demonstrated on grade level in Algebra I at the end of the course. In Biology I, 77.7% of pupils demonstrated on grade level science understanding at the end of the Biology course.[62] The requirement that pupils pass the Keystone Exams in reading, algebra I and bIology I in order to graduate was postponed until 2019 by the Pennsylvania General Assembly because less than 60% of 12 grade pupils statewide would have been eligible for graduation from high school due to failing one or more Keystone Exams.[63]

2015 School Performance Profile

Lewisburg Area High School achieved an SPP of 78.9 out of 100. The PDE reported that 87.8% of the High School's students were on grade level in reading/literature. In Algebra 1, 86.9% of students showed on grade level skills at the end of the course. In Biology I, 85% demonstrated on grade level science understanding at the end of the course.[64] Statewide, 53 percent of schools with an eleventh grade achieved an academic score of 70 or better. Five percent of the 2,033 schools with 11th grade were scored at 90 and above; 20 percent were scored between 80 and 89; 28 percent between 70 and 79; 25 percent between 60 and 69 and 22 percent below 60. The Keystone Exam results showed: 73 percent of students statewide scored at grade-level in English, 64 percent in Algebra I and 59 percent in biology.[65][66]

2014 School Performance Profile

Lewisburg Area High School achieved 78.7 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, mathematics and science achievement. In reading/literature - 82% were on grade level. In Algebra 1, 77% showed on grade level skills at the end of the class. In Biology, 81% showed on grade level science understanding.[67] Lewisburg Area High School's score ranked 6th among 18 Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit high schools.[68] According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2,134 of 2,947 Pennsylvania public schools (72 percent of Pennsylvania public schools), achieved an academic score of 70 or higher.[69] Fifty-three percent of schools statewide received lower SPP scores compared with last year's, while 46 percent improved. A few schools scores remained unchanged.[70]

2013 School Performance Profile

Lewisburg Area High School achieved 77.8 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, mathematics and science achievement. In reading/literature - 85% were on grade level. In Algebra 1 70.8% showed on grade level skills. In Biology, 76.67% showed on grade level science understanding.[71]

AYP History

In 2003 through 2012, the Lewisburg Area High School achieved AYP status under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[72]

PSSA Results

Pennsylvania System of School Assessments, commonly called PSSAs are No Child Left Behind Act related examinations which were administered from 2003 through 2012, in all Pennsylvania public high schools. The exams were administered in the Spring of each school year. The goal was for 100% of students to be on grade level or better in reading and mathematics, by the Spring of 2014. The tests focused on the state's Academic Standards for reading, writing, mathematics and science. The Science exam included content in science, technology, ecology and the environmental studies. The mathematics exam included: algebra I, algebra II, geometry and trigonometry. The standards were first published in 1998 and are mandated by the Pennsylvania State Board of Education.[73]

11th Grade Reading
  • 2012 - 88% on grade level (63% Advanced). Ranked 2nd among CSIU16 region 11th grades. In Pennsylvania 67% of 11th graders were reading on grade level.
  • 2011 - 85.7% (59.4% Advanced). Ranked 1st among CSIU16 region 11th grades. State - 69%[74]
  • 2010 - 88% (50% Advanced). Ranked 1st among CSIU16 region 11th grades. State - 67%[75]
  • 2009 - 84% (56% Advanced). State - 65%.[76]
  • 2008 - 88% (60% Advanced). State- 65%
  • 2007 - 84%, State - 65%
  • 2006 - 82%, State - 65%
  • 2005 - 84%, State - 65%
11th Grade Math
  • 2012 - 78% on grade level, (45% Advanced). Ranks 2nd among High Schools in CSIU16 region 11th grades. State - 59%
  • 2011 - 76% (42% Advanced). Ranks 2nd among High Schools in CSIU16 region 11th grades. State - 60%
  • 2010 - 73%, Ranks 3rd in CSIU16 region 11th grades. State - 59%[77]
  • 2009 - 74% (32% Advanced). State - 56%[78]
  • 2008 - 76% (40% Advanced). State - 56%
  • 2007 - 69% (37% Advanced). State - 53%
  • 2006 - 66% (34% Advanced). State - 52%
  • 2005 - 66% (25% Advanced). State - 51%
11th Grade Science:
  • 2012 - 83% on grade level. Boys - 85% | Girls - 81%. State - 42%. Ranked 1st among public High Schools in CSIU16 region.[79]
  • 2011 - 73%, Boys - 70% | Girls - 72%. State - 40%. Ranked 1st among High Schools in CSIU16 region.[80]
  • 2010 - 71%, State - 40%. Ranked 1st among High Schools in CSIU16 region.[81] In 2010 - 75% of Males scored advanced and proficient in 11th grade science. 67% of Females scored advanced and proficient.
  • 2009 - 74%, State - 40%.[82]
  • 2008 - 68% (37% Advanced). State - 39%

College remediation: According to a Pennsylvania Department of Education study released in January 2009, 7% of Lewisburg Area School District graduates required remediation in mathematics and or reading before they were prepared to take college level courses in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education or community colleges.[83] Less than 66% of Pennsylvania high school graduates, who enroll in a four-year college in Pennsylvania, will earn a bachelor's degree within six years. Among Pennsylvania high school graduates pursuing an associate degree, only one in three graduate in three years.[84] Per the Pennsylvania Department of Education, one in three recent high school graduates who attend Pennsylvania's public universities and community colleges takes at least one remedial course in math, reading or English.

Lewisburg High School was named as one of the nation's outstanding high schools by US News and World Report in December 2008. The school was identified as a Silver level school for academic programs and student achievement.[85] It did not achieve the designation in 2009 or 2010.[86] In 2013, Lewisburg Area High School was recognized as a Silver level high school ranking 1,184 in the United States of America.[87]

Graduation requirements[edit]

In 2010, the Lewisburg School Board has determined that a student must earn 27 credits to graduate, including: English 4 credits, Social Studies 4 credits, Mathematics 4 credits, Science 4 credits, Physical Education 2 credits, Arts/humanities 2 credits, Health 0.5 credits and Electives 6.5 credits.[88]

By law, all Pennsylvania secondary school students must complete a project as a part of their eligibility to graduate from high school. The type of project, its rigor and its expectations are set by the individual school district.[89] At LEHS a minimum of 65 hours must be spent on the student's project. The work is done independently. Effective with the graduating class of 2017, the Pennsylvania State Board of Education eliminated the state mandate that students complete a culminating project in order to graduate.[90]

By Pennsylvania School Board regulations, beginning with the class of 2017, public school students must demonstrate successful completion of secondary level course work in Algebra I, Biology, and English Literature by passing the Keystone Exams.[91] The exam is given at the end of the course. Keystone Exams replace the PSSAs for 11th grade.[92]

Dual enrollment[edit]

The Lewisburg Area High School offers a dual enrollment program. This state program permits high school students to take courses, at local higher education institutions, to earn college credits. Students remain enrolled at their high school. The courses count towards high school graduation requirements and towards earning a college degree. The students continue to have full access to activities at their high school. The college credits are offered at a deeply discounted rate at Bloomsburg University. Additionally, Bucknell University allows selected juniors and seniors to attend tuition free. Students have access to the ACE Program at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania that offers discounted credits during the summer months.[93] The state offered a small grant to assist students in costs for tuition, fees and books.[94] The grants were discontinued by Governor Edward Rendell. Under the Pennsylvania Transfer and Articulation Agreement, many Pennsylvania colleges and universities accept these credits for students who transfer to their institutions.[95]

SAT scores[edit]

In 2015, 127 Lewisburg Area School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 56. The Math average score was 563. The Writing average score was 545.[96] The College Board also reported that statewide 96,826 pupils took the exams with average scores declining in all three measurers to: 495 in reading, 511 in math and 484 in writing.[97]

In 2014, 99 Lewisburg Area School District's Verbal Average Score was 549. The Math average score was 552. The Writing average score was 522. Statewide in Pennsylvania, Verbal Average Score was 497. The Math average score was 504. The Writing average score was 480. The College Board also reported that nationwide scores were: 497 in reading, 513 in math and 487 in writing.[98]

In 2013, 116 Lewisburg Area School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 555.85. The Math average score was 551. The Writing average score was 536.55. The College Board reported that statewide scores were: 494 in reading, 504 in math and 482 in writing. The nationwide SAT results were the same as in 2012.[99]

In 2012, Lewisburg Area School District had 117 students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 546. The Math average score was 546. The Writing average score was 528. The statewide Verbal SAT exams results were: Verbal 496, Math 514, Writing 480. In the USA, 1.65 million students took the exams achieving scores: Verbal 496, Math 514, Writing 488. According to the College Board, the maximum score on each section was 800, and 360 students nationwide scored a perfect 2,400.

In 2011, 130 Lewisburg Area High School students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 546. The Math average score was 536. The Writing average score was 516.[100] Pennsylvania ranked 40th among states with SAT scores: Verbal - 493, Math - 501, Writing - 479.[101] In the United States 1.65 million students took the exam in 2011. They averaged 497 (out of 800) verbal, 514 math and 489 in writing.[102]

Donald H Eichhorn Middle School[edit]

Donald H Eichhorn Middle School is located at 2057 Washington Avenue, Lewisburg. In 2013, enrollment was 451 pupils, in grades 6th through 8th, with 21% of pupils eligible for a free lunch due to family poverty. Additionally, 12% of pupils received special education services, while 9.5% of pupils were identified as gifted.[103] According to a 2013 report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[104] Donald H Eichhorn is not a Title I school.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2010, the Donald H Eichhorn Middle School reported an enrollment of 398 pupils in grades 6th through 8th, with 86 pupils receiving a federal free or reduced-price lunch due to family poverty. The school employed 31 teachers, yielding a student–teacher ratio of 13:1.[105] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[106] The school reported an attendance rate of 95% in 2013.

2016 School Performance Profile

SPP 2016 – 78.3 out of 100 points. Donald H Eichhorn Middle School PSSA mandated testing results were: 79.7% of students in 8th were on grade level in reading, while 71.5% of students demonstrated on grade level in mathematics. In science, 79.7% of eighth grade pupils demonstrated on grade level science understanding.[107] In 7th grade, 80.3% of pupils were on grade level in reading, while just 65.8% demonstrated on grade level math skills. Among 6th graders, 81.4% were on grade level in reading and 78.5% were on grade level in math.

2015 School Performance Profile

The PDE reported that 77% of 8th grade students at Donald Eichhorn Middle School students were on grade level in reading on the PSSAs given in April 2015. In math/Algebra 1, 63% of 8th grade students showed on grade level skills. In science, 79% of the school's 8th graders demonstrated on grade level science understanding. No eighth grade writing scores were reported. In 7th grade, 80% were on grade level in reading, while 70% showed on grade level math skills. Among 6th graders, 82% were on grade level in reading and 70% were on grade level in mathematics.[108] Statewide 58% of eighth (8th) graders were on grade level in reading, while 29% demonstrated on grade level math skills. Pennsylvania 7th graders were58% on grade level in reading and 33% demonstrated on grade level math skills. Among sixth (6th) graders, 60.7% were reading on grade level, while 39.7% demonstrated on grade level math skills.[109]

2014 School Performance Profile

Eichhorn Middle School achieved 94.9 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, mathematics and science achievement. In reading/literature - 87.7% were on grade level. In Algebra 1/Math, 93% showed on grade level mathematics skills. In Science, 86% of 8th graders showed on grade level science understanding. In writing, 92% of the 8th grade students demonstrated on grade level writing skills.[110]

2013 School Performance Profile

Donald H Eichhorn Middle School achieved 86.4 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, writing, mathematics and science achievement. In reading, 86% of the students were on grade level. In Mathematics, 91% of the students showed on grade level skills, with 74% achieving advanced. In Science, 75.17% of the 8th graders demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, 90% of the 8th grade students were on grade level.[111]

AYP history

In 2012, Donald H Eichhorn Middle School declined to Warning status under the federal No Child Left BehindAct due to lagging student achievement in reading for special education and low income children .[112] In 2009 through 2011, Donald H Eichhorn Middle School achieved AYP status.[113] In 2009 and 2010 the attendance rate was 95%.[114][115]

PSSA history: PSSAs examinations are given in the Spring of each school year. Sixth and seventh grades are tested in reading and mathematics since 2006. Eighth graders are tested in: reading, writing, mathematics and Science. Beginning in the Spring of 2013, eighth graders, who are enrolled in Algebra I take the Keystone Exam for Algebra I at the end of the course. The testing of 8th grade in reading and mathematics began in 1996.[116] Testing in science began in 2007. The goal is for 100% of students to be on grade level or better in reading and mathematics, by the Spring of 2014. The tests focus on the state's Academic Standards for reading, writing, mathematics and science. The reading standards were published in 1998 and are mandated by the Pennsylvania State Board of Education.[73]

8th Grade Reading:
  • 2012 - 90% on grade level (73% Advanced). State - 79%. Ranked 2nd in CSIU16 region 8th grades.[117]
  • 2011 - 95.3% (77% Advanced). State - 81.8%. Ranked 1st in CSIU16 region 8th grades.
  • 2010 - 94% (74% Advanced). Ranked 1st in CSIU16 region 8th grades. State - 81% of 8th graders were on grade level.[118]
  • 2009 - 92% (77% Advanced). State - 80.9%[119]
  • 2008 - 93% (77% Advanced). State - 78%
  • 2007 - 79% (56% Advanced). State - 75%
  • 2006 - 91% (77% Advanced). State - 70%[120]
  • 2005 - 88% (60% Advanced). State - 64%
8th Grade Math:
  • 2012 - 96% on grade level, (79% Advanced) State - 76%. Ranked 1st in CSIU16 region 8th grades.
  • 2011 - 97.3% (82.4% Advanced) State - 76.9%
  • 2010 - 98% (79% Advanced). State - 75%
  • 2009 - 91%, State - 71%[121]
  • 2008 - 90% (67% Advanced). State - 70%
  • 2007 - 90%, State - 67.9%
  • 2006 - 80% (57% Advanced), State - 62%
  • 2005 - 81% (52% Advanced), State - 62%
8th Grade Science:
  • 2011 - 81%, Boys - 79% | Girls - 84%. State - 59% of 8th graders were on grade level.
  • 2011 - 83.5%, Boys - 84% | Girls - 93%. State - 58.3%
  • 2010 - 81.9%, State - 57%[122]
  • 2009 - 81%, State - 55%
  • 2008 - 78%, State - 50%[123]

In 2010, the middle school was named a School to Watch by the National Forum to Accelerate Middle-Grades Reform. The recognition goes to schools that are: academically excellent by challenging all students, are sensitive to the unique developmental challenges of early adolescence and are democratic and fair, providing every student with high-quality teachers, resources, and supports. Schools must apply for this recognition.[127]

Linntown Intermediate School[edit]

Linntown Intermediate School is located at 1951 Washington Avenue, Lewisburg. In 2013, the school's enrollment was 270 pupils in grades 4th and 5th, with 21% of pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price meals due to family poverty. Additionally, 12.5% of the pupils receive special education services, while 7% are identified as gifted.[128] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of the teachers were rated highly qualified under No Child Left Behind. The School is not a Title I school.[129]

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2010, the school reported an enrollment of 303 pupils in grades 4th and 5th, with 71 pupils receiving a federal free or reduced-price lunch due to family poverty. The school employed 19 teachers, yielding a student–teacher ratio of 15:1.[130] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[131]

2016 School Performance Profile

SPP 2016 – 75.4 out of 100 points. Linntown Intermediate School PSSA mandated testing results were: 86.3% of students in 5th grade were on grade level in reading, while 80.4% of students demonstrated on grade level mathematics skills. In 4th grade, 78.1% were on grade level in reading, while 63.8% demonstrated on grade level math skills. In science, 88.3% of fourth grade pupils demonstrated on grade level understanding of science concepts in the state standards.[132][133]

2015 School Performance Profile

According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 83% of 5th grade students at Linntown Elementary School were on grade level in reading on the PSSAs given in April 2015. In mathematics, 72% of 5th grade students showed on grade level skills. No fifth grade writing scores were reported. In 4th grade, 79% were on grade level in reading, while 70% showed on grade level math skills. In science, 96% of fourth graders showed on grade level understanding.[134] Statewide 61.9% of fifth (5th) graders were on grade level in reading, while 42.8% demonstrated on grade level math skills. Pennsylvania 4th graders were 58.6% on grade level in reading and 44.4% demonstrated on grade level math skills. In science, 77.3% of fourth graders showed on grade level understanding. Among Pennsylvania third (3rd) graders, 62% were reading on grade level, while 48.5% demonstrated on grade level math skills.[135]

2014 School Performance Profile

Linntown Elementary School achieved a score of 89.4 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading, science, writing and mathematics achievement. In 2013-14, only 86% of the students were reading on grade level in grades 4th and 5th. In math, 89% were on grade level (4th-5th grades). In 4th grade science, just 92% of the pupils demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, 85% of 5th grade pupils demonstrated on grade level skills.[136]

2013 School Performance Profile

Linntown Intermediate School achieved 92 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading, science and mathematics achievement. In 2012-13, 85.8% of the students were reading on grade level in grades 4th and 5th. In math, 88% were on grade level. In 4th grade science, 93% of the pupils demonstrated on grade level understanding. In writing, 80% of 5th grade pupils demonstrated on grade level writing skills.[137]

AYP History

In 2005 through 2012, Linntown Intermediate School achieved AYP status each school year.[138] In 2009 and 2010 the attendance rate was 95%.[139]

PSSA History: Each year, in the Spring, the fourth grade is tested in reading, math and science. The fifth grade is evaluated in reading, mathematics and writing.

4th Grade Science:
  • 2012 - 94%, 70% advanced. Boys - 97% | Girls - 91%. State - 82%
  • 2011 - 92%, 55% advanced. Boys - 93% | Girls - 90%. State - 82.9%
  • 2010 - 94.6%, State - 81.5%
  • 2009 - 93.8%, State - 83%
  • 2008 - 87.8%, State - 82%

Kelly Elementary School[edit]

Kelly Elementary School is located at 325 Hospital Drive, Lewisburg. In 2013, the School reported an enrollment of 604 pupils in grades kindergarten through 3rd grade, with 25.6% of its pupils receiving a federal free or reduced price lunch due to family poverty. The school is a federally designated Title I school.[147] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind Act.[148]

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, Kelly Elementary School had 609 pupils, with 154 pupils receiving a free or reduced price lunch due to family poverty, in 2011. Kelly Elementary School Administration reported a student-teacher ratio of 12:1.[149] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind.[150] The School provides half day kindergarten to the majority of its students, with a full day kindergarten program that is targeted to students who would most benefit from added intervention.

2016 School Performance Profile

SPP 2016 – 82.5 out of 100 points. Kelly Elementary School third graders, 77.3% were on grade level in reading and 79% showed on grade level mathematics skills.[132]

2015 School Performance Profile

Among Kelly Elementary School third (3rd) graders, 70% were on grade level in reading (12% below basic) and 45% were on grade level in mathematics (26% below basic).[151]

2014 School Performance Profile

Kelly Elementary School achieved a score of 94.7 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading, science, writing and mathematics achievement. In 2013-14, in 3rd grade, 90% of the pupils were reading on grade level. In math, 95.6% were on grade level in 3rd grade.[152]

2013 School Performance Profile

Kelly Elementary School achieved 91.1 out of 100. The score reflects on grade level: reading and mathematics achievement. In 3rd grade, 87% of the pupils were reading on grade level. In mathematics, 92% of 3rd graders demonstrated on grade level or better mathematics skills, with 56% demonstrating advanced math skills.[153] The attendance rate was 95.9%.

AYP History

Kelly Elementary School achieved AYP status in 2005 through 2012.[154]

PSSA History
3rd Grade Reading:
  • 2012 - 89%, 40% advanced. State - 74% Ranked 5th out of 34 CSIU16 region ES.[155]
  • 2011 - 91%, 40% advanced. State - 77%. Ranked 7th out of 36 CSIU16 region ES.[156]
  • 2010 - 83.9%, State - 75%. Ranked 13th out of 36 CSIU16 Elementary Schools.[157][158]
  • 2009 - 84.3%, State - 77%[159]
  • 2008 - 86.8%, State - 77%
  • 2007 - 80.6%, State - 72.8%
3rd Grade Math:
  • 2012 - 89% on grade level. 52% advanced. State - 80%. Ranked 12th out of 34 schools in CSIU 16 region.[160]
  • 2011 - 93.3% 64% advanced. State - 83.5%. Ranked 11th out of 35 schools in CSIU 16 region.[161]
  • 2010 - 92%, State - 75%. Ranked 14th out of 36 CSIU16 Elementary Schools.[162]
  • 2009 - 87.7%, State - 81%
  • 2008 - 86.1%, State - 81%
  • 2007 - 90.3%, State - 78%
Reading 3rd graders from low family income families:
  • 2012 - 71% on grade level. State - 59%
  • 2011 - 79% on grade level. State - 64%
  • 2010 - 64.8% on grade level, State - 61.2%[163]
Mathematics 3rd graders from low family income families:
  • 2012 - 74%, State - 66%
  • 2011 - 79%, State - 73%
  • 2010 - 86.4%, State - 74.4%

Special education[edit]

In December 2012, Lewisburg Area School District Administration reported that 228 pupils or 12% of the district's pupils received Special Education services, with 52% of identified students having a specific learning disability. In December 2010, the District administration reported that 228 pupils or 11.9% of the District's pupils received Special Education services, with 57% of identified students having a specific learning disability. In December 2009, the District administration reported that 216 pupils or 11.3% of the district's pupils received Special Education services, with 60% of identified students having a specific learning disability.[164]

In 2007, Pennsylvania Secretary of Education Gerald Zahorchak testified before the Pennsylvania House Education Committee regarding full day kindergarten and taxpayer funded preschool. He claimed that districts which offered these programs would see a significant decrease in special education students due to early identification and early intervention. He asserted the high cost of full day kindergarten would be recouped by Districts in lower special education costs.[165] Lewisburg Area School District has seen no decrease in the percentage of special education students it serves, yielding no savings.

In 2010, the state of Pennsylvania provided $1,026,815,000 for special education services. This funding was in addition to the state's basic education per pupil funding, as well as, all other state and federal funding.[166] The Pennsylvania Special Education funding system assumes that 16% of the district's students receive special education services. It also assumes that each student's needs accrue the same level of costs.[167] The state requires each district to have a three-year special education plan to meet the unique needs of its special education students.[168] Overidentification of students, in order to increase state funding, has been an issue in the Commonwealth. Some districts have more than 20% of its students receiving special education services while others have 10% supported through special education.[169] In 2012, the Obama Administration's US Department of Education issued a directive that schools include students with disabilities in extracurricular activities, including sports.[170]

Lewisburg Area School District received a $1,011,690 supplement for special education services in 2010-2011.[171] For the 2011-12, 2012–13 and 2013–14 school years, all Pennsylvania public school districts received the same level of funding for special education that they received in 2010-2011. This level funding is provided regardless of changes in the number of pupils who need special education services and regardless of the level of services the respective students required.[172][173] For the 2014-2015 school year, LASD received an increase to $1,023,986 from the Commonwealth for special education funding.[174] For the 2016-17 school year, Lewisburg received an increase to $1,060,305 from the Commonwealth for special education funding.[174]

Additionally, the state provides supplemental funding for extraordinarily impacted students. The District must apply for this added funding.

Gifted education[edit]

In 2013, Lewisburg Area School District Administration reported that 7.8% of its students were identified as gifted.[175] Lewisburg Area School District Administration reported that 187 or 9.82% of its students were gifted in 2009. The highest percentage of gifted students reported among all 500 school districts and 100 public charter schools in Pennsylvania was North Allegheny School District with 15.5% of its students identified as gifted.[176] By law, the District must provide mentally gifted programs at all grade levels. The referral process for a gifted evaluation can be initiated by teachers or parents by contacting the student's building principal and requesting an evaluation. All requests must be made in writing. To be eligible for mentally gifted programs in Pennsylvania, a student must have a cognitive ability of at least 130 as measured on a standardized ability test by a certified school psychologist. Other factors that indicate giftedness will also be considered for eligibility.[177][178]

School safety and bullying[edit]

Lewisburg Area School District administration reported there were eight (8) incidents of bullying in the District in 2012. Additionally, there were five assaults on students and no sexual incidents involving students. The local law enforcement was involved in twelve incidents at the schools, with one arrest.[179][180] Each year the school safety data is reported by the district to the Safe School Center, which then publishes the compiled reports online.

Lewisburg Area School Board has provided the district's antibullying policy online.[181] The District uses the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. All Pennsylvania schools are required to have an anti-bullying policy incorporated into their Code of Student Conduct. The policy must identify disciplinary actions for bullying and designate a school staff person to receive complaints of bullying. The policy must be available on the school's website and posted in every classroom. All Pennsylvania public schools must provide a copy of its anti-bullying policy to the Office for Safe Schools every year, and shall review their policy every three years. Additionally, the District must conduct an annual review of that policy with students.[182] The Center for Schools and Communities works in partnership with the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime & Delinquency and the Pennsylvania Department of Education to assist schools and communities as they research, select and implement bullying prevention programs and initiatives.[183][184]

Education standards relating to student safety and anti harassment programs are described in the 10.3. Safety and Injury Prevention in the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Health, Safety and Physical Education.[185]

Budget[edit]

Pennsylvania public school districts budget and expend funds according to procedures mandated by the General Assembly and the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE). An annual operating budget is prepared by school district administrative officials. A uniform form is furnished by the PDE and submitted to the board of school directors for approval prior to the beginning of each fiscal year on July 1.

Under Pennsylvania's Taxpayer Relief Act, Act 1 of the Special Session of 2006, all school districts of the first class A, second class, third class and fourth class must adopt a preliminary budget proposal. The proposal must include estimated revenues and expenditures and the proposed tax rates. This proposed budget must be considered by the Board no later than 90 days prior to the date of the election immediately preceding the fiscal year. The preliminary budget proposal must also be printed and made available for public inspection at least 20 days prior to its adoption. The board of school directors may hold a public hearing on the budget, but are not required to do so. The board must give at least 10 days public notice of its intent to adopt the final budget according to Act 1 of 2006.[186]

In August 2015, Lewisburg Area School Board and the teachers union entered into an early bird contract which provides 3% raises each year July 2016 and expires in June 2019.[187] Lewisburg Area School District teacher and administrator retirement benefits are equal to at least 2.00% x Final Average Salary x Total Credited Service. (Some teachers benefits utilize a 2.50% benefit factor.)[188] After 40 years of service, a teacher can retire with 100% of the average salary of their final 3 years of employment. According to a study conducted at the American Enterprise Institute, in 2011, public school teachers’ total compensation is roughly 50 percent higher than they would likely receive in the private sector. The study found that the most generous benefits that teachers receive are not accounted for in many studies of compensation including: pension, retiree health benefits and job security.[189]

In 2013, the average teacher salary in Lewisburg Area School District was $63,325 a year, while the cost of the benefits teachers received was $24,127 per employee, for a total annual average teacher compensation of $87,453.[190] In August 2013, the Board announced a new employment contract with the teachers' union to run through June 30, 2016. It guarantees annual raises for the teachers coupled with step raises and longevity raises. The district recently withdrew from the Central Susquehanna Region School Employees Health and Welfare Trust, a health maintenance program, in favor of a Highmark Blue Shield program.[191] According to State Representative Fred Keller, increases in compensation given to the LASD faculty has exceeded the rate of inflation every year for the past decade.[192][193]

In 2012, the average teacher salary in Lewisburg Area School District was $61,779 a year, while the cost of the benefits teachers received was $21,932 per employee, for a total annual average teacher compensation of $83,712.[194] The District employed 160 teachers with an average salary of $63,021 and a top salary of $150,000.[195] The cost of the District's pension payment to PSERS was $834,816, while the payment to the Social Security fund was another $457,455 in 2013.

In 2009, Lewisburg Area School District reported employing 198 teachers and administrators with a median salary of $60,840 and a top salary of $121,835.[196] The teacher's work year is 188 days with one preparation day in the contract year. The teacher work 7 hours and 45 minutes per day with a 30-minute duty-free lunch and a daily preparation period. Additionally, the teachers receive a defined benefit pension, health insurance, professional development reimbursement, paid personal days, 10 paid sick days, and other benefits.[197][198] In 2011, the average teacher salary in Lewisburg Area School District was $53,036.66 a year, while the cost of the benefits teachers receive was $16,992.03 per employee, for a total annual average teacher compensation of $70,028.69.[199] According to a study conducted at the American Enterprise Institute, in 2011, public school teachers’ total compensation is roughly 50 percent higher than they would likely receive in the private sector. The study found that the most generous benefits that teachers receive are not accounted for in many studies of compensation, including: pension, retiree health benefits and job security.[200]

In 2007, the district employed 129 teachers. The average teacher salary in the district was $54,005 for 180 school days worked.[201]

Reserves

In 2014, the Lewisburg Area School Board reported it had built a reserve fund of $6,271,449.00.[202] In 2010, Lewisburg Area School District reported having an unreserved designated fund balance of $1,257,049.00 and an unreserved-undesignated fund balance of $2,114,667.[203] In 2009, the District reported having an unreserved designated fund balance of $1,257,049 and an unreserved-undesignated fund balance of $2,036,576[204] In 2008, the District's unreserved designated fund balance was reported to the state at $652,375 and the unreserved-undesignated fund balance was $2,809,626.[205]

Per pupil spending Lewisburg Area School District administration reported that per pupil spending in 2008 was $12,619, which ranked 209th in the state's 501 public school districts.[206] In 2010, the District's per pupil spending had risen to $13,689.13.[207] Among the states, Pennsylvania's total per pupil revenue (including all sources) ranked 11th at $15,023 per student, in 2008-09.[208] In 2007, the Pennsylvania per pupil total expenditures was $12,759.[209] The U.S. Census Bureau reports that Pennsylvania spent $8,191 per pupil in school year 2000-01.[210]

Administration costs

Lewisburg Area School District administrative costs per pupil was $623.58 per pupil in 2008. The District ranked 414th for administrative spending among Pennsylvania public school districts. The lowest administrative cost per pupil in Pennsylvania was $398 per pupil.[211] Dr. Mark D. DiRocco (salary $150.000 in 2012) contract 2011-June 30, 2016[212] Salary $156,825 (2015–16), (salary $159,500 in 2016-17)[213] Became superintendent in 2002. Retired in December 2016.

State Audits In December 2011, the Pennsylvania Auditor General conducted a performance audit of the district. It found the District had not implemented prior recommendations regarding school board members failure to file financial interest forms as required by law.[214] In January 2009, the Pennsylvania Auditor General conducted a performance audit of the district. Significant findings were reported to the administration and the school board, including that board members had failed to complete the legally required Statement of Financial Interests forms each year, in violation of the Ethics Act.[215] An audit conducted by a local certified public accountant reported that in 2010 the District had General Fund Reserves over $26 million.[216]

Tuition Students who live in the Lewisburg Area School District's attendance area may choose to attend one of Pennsylvania's 157 public charter schools. A student living in a neighboring public school district or a foreign exchange student may seek admission to Lewisburg Area School District. For these cases, the Pennsylvania Department of Education sets an annual tuition rate for each school district. It is the amount the public school district pays to a charter school for each resident student that attends the charter and it is the amount a nonresident student's parents must pay to attend the District's schools. The 2012 tuition rates for Lewisburg Area were: Elementary School - $9,444.36, High School - $9,917.31.[217] In 2015, the tuition rates for Lewisburg Area School District were: $10,229.10 for elementary students and $10,652.58 for high school students.[218]

Donations In June 2011, the Green Dragon Foundation, a local nonprofit organization, donated $34,000 to be used specifically to enhance the inquiry based, science curriculum in the intermediate school.[219] In 2010, the Green Dragon Foundation gave a $40,000 donation to be used to purchase computer equipment for classroom use in the high school and Kelly Elementary School.[220]

In November 2011, Lewisburg Area School District received an award for sharply reducing its consumption of resources (electric, natural gas, fuel oil and water) by 22% in two years. This is reported to have saved the District over $187,000.[221]

Building projects In June 2012, the Lewisburg Area School Board, led by Kathy Swope, School Board President, voted to move ahead with its plans to build a new high school and sports complex despite the local and national economic downturn and resistance by some residents. The plan calls for prioritizing building sports facilities for soccer and lacrosse.[222] In May 2014, the District announced entering into an agreement with North Union Soccer Club, a local private soccer group, to upgrade the new soccer field to artificial turf which will raise the cost by another $577,000 over the original $400,000 estimated cost. The club has pledged to pay $400,000 towards the cost. The agreement gives the club priority over using the two new soccer fields to be installed when the District is not using them.[223] In July 2014, the Board offered to pay half the cost of adding a turning lane to the new high school complex an estimated $180,000.[224] The cost of the new high school and sports facilities was projected to be $37 million. When the cost of the bonds the board took out to pay for the construction are included the cost was $73 million.[225]

In 1997, the District reported enrollment at 1,935 pupils, with 1,013 pupils at the middle school and high school.[226] In October 2013, the District reported an enrollment of 1,884 pupils, with 559 pupils at the high school.[227]

Lewisburg Area School District is funded by a combination of: a local earned income tax - 1.5%, a local property tax, two per capita taxes of $5 and $10, a real estate transfer tax 0.50%, local non profit grants, coupled with substantial funding from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the federal government. Interest earnings on reserve funds accounts also provide nontax income to the District. In the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, pension income and social security income are exempted from Pennsylvania personal income tax and local earned income tax regardless of the individual's level of wealth.[228] The average Pennsylvania public school teacher pension in 2011 exceeds $60,000 a year plus they receive federal Social Security benefits: both are free of Pennsylvania state income tax and local income tax which funds local public schools.[229] Effective 2016, active duty military are also exempted from paying the local earned income tax in Pennsylvania.[230][231]

State basic education funding[edit]

According to a report from Representative Todd Stephens office, Lewisburg Area School District receives 24.3% of its annual revenue from the state.[232]

For the 2016-17 school year, Lewisburg Area School District received $3,537,052 in Basic Education Funding from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This is a 7.5% increase over 2015-16 funding to the District. The highest percentage of BEF increase in Union County was awarded to Lewisburg Area School District under the state's Basic Education Funding formula. For the 2016-17 school year, Pennsylvania increased its public education spending to a record high of $5,895 billion. It was a $200 million increase, 3.51% increase over the 2015-16 appropriation.[233] The state also funded Ready to Learn grants at $250 million and Special Education funding received a $20 million increase.[234] The state also paid $492 million to the school employee social security fund and another $2.064 billion to the teacher's pension fund.[235] The district also received $168,400 in Ready to Learn grant funds.

For the 2015-16 school year, Governor Tom Wolf released a partial Basic Education Funding of $1,544,843 to Lewisburg Area School District, in January 2016.[236] This was part of $10.3 billion in school funding withheld from the public schools, by the Governor since the summer of 2015.[237] The dispersment did not follow the new Basic Education Funding formula which had been established by the Pennsylvania General Assembly in 2015.[238] Ten (10) Pennsylvania school districts received no increase in Basic Eductaion funding under Governor Wolf.[239][240] In April 2016, Governor Wolf announced his finalized dispersement of 2015-16 state Basic Education Funding. Lewisburg Area School District was to receive a 1.96% increase for a total funding of $3,287,925.[241] This is $118,352 less than the District was to receive by law under the state's Fair Funding approved in 2015.[242] The highest increase in funding statewide was awarded by Governor Wolf to Wilkinsburg Borough School District which got a 48.07% increase in state Basic Education Funding. The average BEF increase among the Commonwealth's 500 public school districts for 2015-16 was 2.21%. In Union County, the highest percentage increase was awarded to Mifflinburg Area School District - 2.37%.

In compliance with a legislative mandate that was passed with veto proof majorities in the PA House and Senate,[243] the final BEF funding was determined for 2015-16, in April 2016. Lewisburg Area School District received $3,288,841 in Basic Education Funds for the 2015-16 school year. This was a 6.11% increase yielding a $189,481 increase over the previous school year funding. The District also received $168,400 in Ready to Learn funding from the state.[244]

For the 2014-15 school year, Lewisburg Area School District received $3,099,277 in State Basic Education funding. The District also received $45,927 in Accountability Block Grant funding and $79,348 in new Ready To Learn Block grant. The State's enacted Education Budget included $5,526,129,000 for the 2014-2015 Basic Education Funding.[245] The Education budget also included Accountability Block Grant funding at $100 million and $241 million in new Ready to Learn funding for public schools that focus on student achievement and academic success. The State is paying $500.8 million to Social Security on the school employees behalf and another $1.16 billion to the state teachers pension system (PSERS). In total, Pennsylvania's Education budget for K-12 public schools is $10 billion. This was a $305 million increase over 2013-2014 state spending and the greatest amount ever allotted by the Commonwealth for its public schools.[246]

For the 2013-14 school year, Lewisburg Area School District received a 2.9% increase or $3,100,465 in Pennsylvania Basic Education Funding. This is $86,676 more than its 2012-13 state BEF to the District. Additionally, Lewisburg Area School District received $45,927 in Accountability Block Grant funding to focus on academic achievement and level funding for special education services. The District received the highest increase of BEF among the four public school districts in Union County. The District has the option of applying for several other state and federal grants to increase revenues. The Commonwealth's budget increased Basic Education Funding statewide by $123 million to over $5.5 billion. Most of Pennsylvania's 500 public school districts received an increase of Basic Education Funding in a range of 0.9% to 4%. Eight public school districts received exceptionally high funding increases of 10% to 16%. The highest increase in state funding was awarded to Austin Area School District which received a 22.5% increase in Basic Education Funding.[247] The state funded the PSERS (Pennsylvania school employee pension fund) with $1,017,000,000 and Social Security payments for school employees of $495 million.[248]

For the 2012-13 school year, Lewisburg Area School District received $3,059,716 in state Basic Education Funding.[249] The Governor's Executive Budget for 2012-2013 includes $6,516,087,000 for the Student Achievement Education Block Grant appropriation (SAEBG).[250] This amount is a $21,823,000 increase (0.34%) over the 2011-2012 appropriations for Basic Education Funding, School Employees' Social Security, Pupil Transportation, Nonpublic and Charter School Pupil Transportation, which are rolled into SAEBG. Lewisburg Area School District received $45,927 in Accountability Block Grant funds.

In the 2011-12 school year, Lewisburg Area School District received $3,013,789 in state Basic Education Funding.[251] Lewisburg Area School District also received $45,927 in Accountability Block Grant funding to focus on academic achievement. The enacted Pennsylvania state Education budget includes $5,354,629,000 for the 2011-2012 Basic Education Funding appropriation. This amount is a $233,290,000 increase (4.6%) over the enacted State appropriation for 2010-2011. The highest increase in state basic education funding was awarded to Duquesne City School District, which got a 49% increase in state funding for 2011-12.[252] Districts experienced a reduction in funding, due to the state's loss of federal stimulus funding, which ended in 2011. In 2010, the district reported that 405 pupils received a free or reduced-price lunch due to the family meeting the federal poverty level.

For the 2010-11 school year, the Lewisburg Area School District received a 4.59% increase in state Basic Education Funding resulting in a $3,300,514 payment.[253] This was the highest increase in BEF in Union County. Kennett Consolidated School District in Chester County received the highest increase in the state at 23.65% increase in funding for the 2010-11 school year. One hundred fifty school districts received the base 2% increase in 2010-11. The state's hold harmless policy regarding state basic education funding continued where a district received at least the same amount as the year before, even where enrollment had significantly declined. The amount of increase each school district received was set by Governor Edward Rendell and then Secretary of Education Gerald Zahorchak, as a part of the state budget proposal given each February. This was the second year of Governor Rendell's policy to fund some districts at a far greater rate than others.[254]

In the 2009-10 school budget year, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania provided Lewisburg Area School District a 6.01% increase in Basic Education Funding (BEF) for a total of $3,155,658. The District received $228,070 in English Language Learner Supplemental funding. In 2009-10, the highest BEF increase went to Muhlenberg School District of Berks County which received an over 22% increase. Ninety school districts received the base 2% increase.[255] The amount of increase each school district received was set by Governor Edward G. Rendell and the Secretary of Education Gerald Zahorchak, as a part of the state budget proposal.

The state Basic Education Funding to the Lewisburg Area School District in 2008-09 was $2,976,818. In 2007-08, the District's actual spending was $16,808,672.13. In 2008, Lewisburg Area School district reported that 374 of its pupils received a free or reduced-price lunch due to their family meeting the federal poverty threshold of $22,050 for a family of four. Many state and federal programs use the threshold to calculate benefits.

Classrooms for the Future grant[edit]

The Classroom for the Future state program provided districts with hundreds of thousands of extra state funding to buy laptop computers for each core curriculum high school class (English, Science, History, Math), along with other specialized equipment and provided funding for teacher training to optimize the use of the computers. The program was funded from 2006-2009. Lewisburg Area School District did not apply to participate in 2006-07. In 2007-08, the District received $184,892. The District received $45,413 in extra state funding in 2008-09.[256] In 2010 the grants were discontinued by Governor Edward G. Rendelll in the state budget process.

Ready to Learn grant[edit]

Beginning in the 2014-2015 budget, the State funded a new Ready to Learn Grant for public schools. A total of $100 million is allocated through a formula to districts based on the number of students, level of poverty of community as calculated by its market value/personal income aid ratio (MV/PI AR) and the number of English language learners. Ready to Learn Block Grant funds may be used by the Districts for: school safety; Ready by 3 early childhood intervention programs; individualized learning programs; and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs.[257]

In 2015, Lewisburg Area School District received $79,348 in Ready to Learn Grant dollars in addition to State Basic Education funding, Special Education funding, Accountability Block Grant funding, PreK Counts funding, transportation reimbursement, reimbursement for Social Security payments for employees and other state grants which the district must apply to receive.

PreK Counts grant[edit]

Lewisburg Area School District receives state funding to provide preschool at the elementary school. For the 2011 school year, Pre-K Counts was funded at the 2010 levels of $83.6 million statewide in Gov. Tom Corbett's proposed budget,. The state also supplements the federal Head Start preschool program with an additional $37.6 million. Pre-K Counts funding was initiated during the Rendell administration. In 2007-08 the state funded Pre-K Counts at $75 million. Lewisburg Area School District received $63,200 in state funding in 2009-10 to provide preschool to 20 qualified children.[258] In 2009-10 the district received $209,350 to provide preschool to 52 children.[259][260]

Science It's Elementary grant[edit]

Linntown Elementary School successfully applied to participate and received a Science It's Elementary grant, in 2008-09.[261] For the 2008-09 school year, the program was offered in 143 schools reaching 2,847 teachers and 66,973 students across Pennsylvania.[262] In 2007, the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) initiated an effort to improve science instruction in the Commonwealth's public elementary schools. Called Science: It's Elementary, the program is a hands on instruction approach for elementary science classes that develops problem-solving and critical thinking skills.[263] To encourage schools to adopt the program's standards aligned curriculum, the state provided a grant to cover the costs of materials and extensive mandatory teacher training.[264] The district was required to develop a three-year implementation plan for the participating school. The school district administration was also required to appoint a district liaison who was paid $3000 by PDE to serve as the conduit of all information between the district and the Department and its agents along with submitting orders and distributing supplies to implementing teachers. For the 2006-07 state education budget, $10 million was allocated.[265] The 2006-07 State Education Budget provided $635 million in new spending for pre-K through 12th grades for the 2006-07 school year. This marks an 8-percent increase over 2005-06 public school funding.[266] The grant program was expanded to $14.5 million in the 2008-09 budget. The grant was discontinued in 2010, by Governor Rendell, due to a massive state budget crisis.

Other grants[edit]

Lewisburg Area School District did not participate in: Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Environmental Education grants;[267][268] 2012 and 2013 Pennsylvania Hybrid Learning Grants;[269] Project 720 High School Reform grants;[270] nor the PA 2012 Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy grant.[271]

Federal grants[edit]

Lewisburg Area School District received $778,080 in ARRA - Federal Stimulus money to be used in specific programs like special education and meeting the academic needs of low-income students.[272][273] The funding was limited to the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 school years.[274] Due to the temporary nature of the funding, schools were repeatedly advised to use the funds for one time expenditures like: acquiring equipment, making repairs to buildings, training teachers to provide more effective instruction or purchasing books and software.

Race to the Top grant[edit]

Lewisburg Area School District officials did not apply for the first Race to the Top federal grant which would have brought the district hundreds of thousands of additional federal dollars for improving student academic achievement.[275] Participation required the administration, the school board and the local teachers' union to sign an agreement to prioritize improving student academic success.[276] In Pennsylvania, 120 public school districts and 56 charter schools agreed to participate.[277] Pennsylvania was not approved. The failure of districts to agree to participate was cited as one reason that Pennsylvania was not approved.[278]

Title II grants[edit]

The Federal government provides annual grants to schools to be used to improve the quality of teacher instructions to pupils. The goal is to provide each child in public schools with "High Quality" teachers and principals as defined by the state.[279] The funds are sent to the state Department of Education which distributes them to each school district and charter school.[280] Beginning in 2002, the federal funding committed to Title II was $3,175,000,000.

Public school district administrations must apply to the state annually for the Title II funds. In 2012-13, Lewisburg Area School District received $71,528 in federal Title II funding.[281] In 2014-15, Lewisburg Area School District applied for and received $67,862.[282]

English language learners grant[edit]

The Federal government provides annual grants to schools to assist in educating immigrant children and children who are identified as limited English proficient.[283] Upon registering for school a language survey is done for all new enrollment pupils, typically in kindergarten or preschool. They identify the primary language spoken at home. This data is collected and submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, which in turn notifies the federal government.[284]

In 2012-13, Lewisburg Area School District received $11,407 in Title III funding for English language learners.[285] For 2014-15, Lewisburg Area School District received $11,691 in Title III funding.[286]

Common Cents state initiative[edit]

The Lewisburg School Board did not participate in the Pennsylvania Department of Education Common Cents program. The program called for the state to audit the district, at no cost to local taxpayers, to identify ways the district could save tax dollars.[287][288][289] After the review of the information, the District was not required to implement the recommended cost savings changes.

Real estate taxes[edit]

Property tax rates in 2016-17 were set by the Lewisburg Area School Board at 17.03 mills. Superintendent Mark DiRocco cited rising teacher health insurance and pension costs as the dominant reasons for the increased taxes. In 2014-15, several Lewisburg Area School Board members unsuccessfully advocated for a higher tax increase to build a larger reserve. A mill is $1 of tax for every $1,000 of a property's assessed value. Irregular property reassessments have become a serious issue in the commonwealth as it creates a significant disparity in taxation within a community and across a region. Property taxes, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, apply only to real estate - land and buildings. The property tax is not levied on cars, business inventory, or other personal property. Certain types of property are exempt from property taxes, including: places of worship, places of burial, private social clubs, charitable and educational institutions and government property. Irregular property reassessments have become a serious issue in the commonwealth as it creates a significant disparity in taxation within a community and across a region. Additionally, service related, disabled US military veterans may seek an exemption from paying property taxes. Pennsylvania school district revenues are dominated by two main sources: 1) Property tax collections, which account for the vast majority (between 75-85%) of local revenues; and 2) Act 511 tax collections, which are around 15% of revenues for school districts.[290] When the school district includes municipalities in two counties, each of which has different rates of property tax assessment, a state board equalizes the tax rates between the counties.[291] In 2010, miscalculations by the State Tax Equalization Board (STEB) were widespread in the Commonwealth and adversely impacted funding for many school districts, including those that did not cross county borders.[292] A new downtown bookstore, owned by Bucknell University, has brought $23,559 in additional tax revenue.[293]

The District has permanently lost property tax revenues as the State has acquired properties to build the Central Susquehanna Valley Thruway through the Winfield area.[294] The northern section of the project has required taking 90 private properties.[295]

The average yearly property tax paid by Union County residents amounts to about 3.25% of their yearly income. Union County ranked 476th out of the 3143 United States counties for property taxes as a percentage of median income.[306] According to a report prepared by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, the total real estate taxes collected by all school districts in Pennsylvania rose from $6,474,133,936 in 1999-00 to $10,438,463,356 in 2008-09 and to $11,153,412,490 in 2011.[307] Property taxes in Pennsylvania are relatively high on a national scale. According to the Tax Foundation, Pennsylvania ranked 11th in the U.S. in 2008 in terms of property taxes paid as a percentage of home value (1.34%) and 12th in the country in terms of property taxes as a percentage of income (3.55%).[308]

Act 1 Adjusted index[edit]

The Act 1 of 2006 Index regulates the rates at which each school district can raise property taxes in Pennsylvania. Districts are not allowed to raise taxes above that index unless they allow voters to vote by referendum, or they seek an exception from the state Department of Education. The base index for the 2011-2012 school year is 1.4 percent, but the Act 1 Index can be adjusted higher, depending on a number of factors, such as property values and the personal income of district residents. Act 1 included 10 exceptions, including: increasing pension costs, increases in special education costs, a catastrophe like a fire or flood, increase in health insurance costs for contracts in effect in 2006 or dwindling tax bases. The base index is the average of the percentage increase in the statewide average weekly wage, as determined by the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, for the preceding calendar year and the percentage increase in the Employment Cost Index for Elementary and Secondary Schools, as determined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the U.S. Department of Labor, for the previous 12-month period ending June 30. For a school district with a market value/personal income aid ratio (MV/PI AR) greater than 0.4000, its index equals the base index multiplied by the sum of .75 and its MV/PI AR for the current year.[309]

The School District Adjusted Index for the Lewisburg Area School District 2006-2007 through 2011-2012.[310]

For the 2016-17 budget year, Lewisburg Area School Board applied for two exceptions to exceed the District's Act 1 Index limit: rising special education costs and escalating teacher pensions costs.[319] Statewide 299 school districts adopted a resolution to not exceed their Act I index in 2016-17.

For the 2015-16 budget year, Lewisburg Area School Board gave notice that it intended to seek two exceptions to exceed their Act 1 Index limit: rising special education costs and escalating teacher pension costs.[320] The Board reported having over $4.6 million in reserves. For the school budget 2015-16, 310 Pennsylvania public school districts adopted a resolution certifying that tax rates would not be increased above its Act 1 Index limit. Another 187 school districts adopted a preliminary budget leaving open the option of exceeding the Index limit. Regarding the pension costs exception, 172 school districts received approval to exceed the Index limit in full, while others received a partial approval of their request. For special education costs, 119 districts received approval to exceed their tax limit. No Pennsylvania public school districts received an approval for the grandfathered construction debts exception.[321]

For the 2014-15 budget year, Lewisburg Area School Board passed a preliminary budget declining to apply for exceptions to exceed their Act 1 Index limit.[322] For the school budget 2014-15, 316 Pennsylvania public school districts adopted a resolution certifying that tax rates would not be increased above its Act 1 Index limit. Another 181 school districts adopted a preliminary budget leaving open the option of exceeding the Index limit. Districts may apply for multiple exceptions each year. For the pension costs exception, 163 school districts received approval to exceed the Index in full, while others received a partial approval of their request. For special education costs, 104 districts received approval to exceed their tax limit. Seven Pennsylvania public school districts received an approval for the grandfathered construction debts exception.[323]

For the 2013-14 budget year, Lewisburg Area School Board applied for two exceptions to exceed the Act 1 Index: Special Education and escalating teacher pension costs. For 2013-2014, 311 Pennsylvania public school districts adopted a resolution certifying that tax rates would not be increased above their index; 171 school districts adopted a preliminary budget leaving open the option of exceeded the Index limit. For the exception for pension costs, 89 school districts received approval to exceed the Index in full while others received a partial approval of their request. For special education costs, 75 districts received approval to exceed the tax limit. For the exception for pension costs, 169 school districts received approval to exceed the Index. Eleven districts received an approval for grandfathered construction debts.[324]

For the 2012-13 budget year, Lewisburg Area School Board applied for an exceptions to exceed the Act 1 Index due to the increasing costs of the teachers' pension. For 2012-2013, 274 school districts adopted a resolution certifying that tax rates would not be increased above their index; 223 school districts adopted a preliminary budget leaving open the option of exceeded the Index limit. For the exception for pension costs, 194 school districts received approval to exceed the Index. For special education costs, 129 districts received approval to exceed the tax limit. For the exception for pension costs, 194 school districts received approval to exceed the Index. For special education costs, 129 districts received approval to exceed the tax limit.[324]

For the 2011-12 school year, the Lewisburg Area School Board applied for two exceptions to exceed the Act 1 Index. They were for special education costs and for teacher pension costs. Each year the Lewisburg Area School Board has the option of adopting either 1) a resolution in January certifying they will not increase taxes above their index or 2) a preliminary budget in February. A school district adopting the resolution may not apply for referendum exceptions or ask voters for a tax increase above the inflation index. A specific timeline for these decisions is publisher each year by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.[325]

According to a state report, for the 2011-2012 school year budgets, 247 school districts adopted a resolution certifying that tax rates would not be increased above their index; 250 school districts adopted a preliminary budget. Of the 250 school districts that adopted a preliminary budget, 231 adopted real estate tax rates that exceeded their index. Tax rate increases in the other 19 school districts that adopted a preliminary budget did not exceed the school district's index. Of the districts who sought exceptions 221 used the pension costs exemption and 171 sought a Special Education costs exemption. Only 1 school district sought an exemption for Nonacademic School Construction Project, while 1 sought an exception for Electoral debt for school construction.[326]

In 2010-11, the Lewisburg Area School Board also applied for 2 exceptions to exceed the index: one for special education expenses and the other for increasing pension costs. In the Spring of 2010, 135 Pennsylvania school boards asked to exceed their adjusted index. Approval was granted to 133 of them and 128 sought an exception for pension costs increases.[327] In 2009, the Lewisburg Area School Board did not apply for Act 1 Exceptions.[328]

Property tax relief[edit]

In 2013, the Lewisburg Area School District property tax relief was set at $163 for 3,204 approved homesteads. The increase was due to a declining participation by property owners. The District received $521,078.30 which was divided equally among participants. In 2011, the Lewisburg Area School District property tax relief was set at $153 for 3,408 approved homesteads.[329] The property tax relief was subtracted from the total annual school property tax bill. Property owners must apply for the relief through the county Treasurer's office. Farmers can qualify for a farmstead exemption on building used for agricultural purposes. The farm must be at least 10 contiguous acres and must be the primary residence of the owner. Farmers can qualify for both the homestead exemption and the farmstead exemption. The highest property tax relief in Pennsylvania went to the residents of Chester Upland School District of Delaware County who received $631 per approved homestead.

  • 2010 - $151 for 3,440 approved homesteads.[330]
  • 2009 - the Homestead/Farmstead Property Tax Relief from gambling for the Lewisburg School District was $156 per approved permanent primary homestead. The highest property tax relief in Pennsylvania went to the residents of Chester Upland School District of Delaware County who received $632 per approved homestead.[331]

Additionally, the Pennsylvania Property Tax/Rent Rebate program is provided for low income Lewisburg Area School District residents aged 65 and older; widows and widowers aged 50 and older; and people with disabilities age 18 and older. The income limit is $35,000 for homeowners. The maximum rebate for both homeowners and renters is $650. Applicants can exclude one-half (1/2) of their Social Security income, so people whose income is substantially more than $35,000 may still qualify for a rebate. Individuals must apply annually for the rebate.[332]

Wellness policy[edit]

Lewisburg Area School Board has established a district wellness policy.[333] The policy deals with nutritious meals served at school, the control of access to some foods and beverages during school hours, age appropriate nutrition education for all students, and physical education for students K-12. The policy is in response to state mandates and federal legislation (P.L. 108 – 265). The law dictates that each school district participating in a program authorized by the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq) or the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 U.S.C. 1771 et seq) "shall establish a local school wellness policy by School Year 2006." Most districts identified the superintendent and school foodservice director as responsible for ensuring local wellness policy implementation.[334]

The legislation placed the responsibility of developing a wellness policy at the local level so the individual needs of each district can be addressed. According to the requirements for the Local Wellness Policy, school districts must set goals for nutrition education, physical activity, campus food provision, and other school-based activities designed to promote student wellness. Additionally, districts were required to involve a broad group of individuals in policy development and to have a plan for measuring policy implementation. Districts were offered a choice of levels of implementation for limiting or prohibiting low nutrition foods on the school campus. In final implementation these regulations prohibit some foods and beverages on the school campus.[335] The Pennsylvania Department of Education required the district to submit a copy of the policy for approval.

Lewisburg Area School District offers both a free school breakfast and a free or reduced-price lunch to children in low income families. All students attending the school can eat breakfast and lunch. Children from families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the federal poverty level are provided a breakfast and lunch at no cost to the family. Children from families with incomes between 130 and 185 percent of the federal poverty level can be charged no more than 30 cents per breakfast. A foster child whose care and placement is the responsibility of the State or who is placed by a court with a caretaker household is eligible for both a free breakfast and a free lunch. Runaway, homeless and Migrant Youth are also automatically eligible for free meals.[336] The meals are partially funded with federal dollars through the United States Department of Agriculture.[337]

In 2013, the USDA issued new restrictions to foods in public schools. The rules apply to foods and beverages sold on all public school district campuses during the day. They limit vending machine snacks to a maximum of 200 calories per item. Additionally, all snack foods sold at school must meet competitive nutrient standards, meaning they must have fruits, vegetables, dairy or protein in them or contain at least 10 percent of the daily value of fiber, calcium, potassium, and Vitamin D.[338] In order to comply with the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 all US public school districts are required to raise the price of their school lunches to $2.60 regardless of the actual cost of providing the lunch.[339] The Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 mandates that Districts raise their full pay lunch prices every year until the price of non-subsidized lunches equals the amount the federal government reimburses schools for free meals. That subsidy in 2013-2014 was $2.93.

In 2014, President Barack Obama ordered a prohibition of advertisements for unhealthy foods on public school campuses during the school day.[340][341]

The Food and Drug Administration requires that students take milk as their beverage at lunch. In accordance with this law, any student requesting water in place of milk with their lunch must present a written request, signed by a doctor, documenting the need for water instead of milk.[342][343]

Lewisburg Area School District provides health services as mandated by the Commonwealth and the federal government. Nurses are available in each building to conduct annual health screenings (data reported to the PDE and state Department of Health) and to dispense prescribed medications to students during the school day. Students can be excluded from school unless they comply with all the State Department of Health's extensive immunization mandates. School nurses monitor each pupil for this compliance.[344][345] Nurses also monitor each child's weight.[346]

In 2016, the Pennsylvania Department of Health distributed to each Pennsylvania high school the overdose antidote drug naloxone in a nasal spray. School nurses were also provided with educational materials and training developed by the National Association of School Nurses.[347] The cost was covered by a grant from a private foundation.[348]

Health eTools program

Lewisburg Area School District participated in Highmark Foundation's Healthy High 5 Health eTools for Schools grant which enabled mobile data collection of pertinent health and physical fitness screening data on students K-12 in a database held by InnerLink, Inc. in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.[349] Health eTools for Schools also provided interdisciplinary research-based curriculum in nutrition, physical education and physical activity to participating districts. The program was discontinued by the company in 2013.[350]

Extracurriculars[edit]

A wide variety of clubs, activities and an extensive, costly athletics program are offered to Lewisburg Area School District students. The District spends over $706,143 a year, excluding transportation or facility costs.[351] Eligibility to participate is determined by school board policy.[352] The District is a member of the Pennsylvania Heartland Athletic Conference. The district administration played a leading role in founding the PHAC in Fall 2008.[353] In 2012, the Lewisburg Area School Board raised the fee to participate in sports - $25 per sport or other activity with an additional $25 for each additional activity/sport. Students who qualify for a free or reduced-price lunch are charged a reduced fee. The fees are for activities and sports provided to grades sixth and higher.[354]

By Pennsylvania law, all K-12 students residing in the District, including those who attend a private school, public cyber charter school, public charter school and those homeschooled, are eligible to participate in the extracurricular programs, including all athletics. They must meet the same eligibility rules as the students enrolled in the district's schools.[355]

According to PA Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting Act 126 of 2014, all volunteer coaches and all those who assist in student activities, must have criminal background checks. Like all school district employees, they must also attend an anti child abuse training once every three years.[356][357][358]

Sports[edit]

Coaches receive compensation as outlined in the teachers' union contract. When athletic competition exceeds the regular season, additional compensation is paid.[359]

According to Pennsylvania's Safety in Youth Sports Act, all sports coaches, paid and volunteer, are required to annually complete the Concussion Management Certification Training and present the certification before coaching.[360][361]

The District funds:

Middle School Sports

According to PIAA directory July 2012[362]

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