Lex Krupp

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The Lex Krupp[1] was a document signed into federal law on November 12, 1943 by Adolf Hitler that made the Krupp company a personal company with specially regulated rules of succession, in order to ensure that the Krupp family enterprise remain intact.[2]

History[edit]

This specialized German law of 1943 was created through the combined efforts of Gustav Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach, the head of the steel concern Fried. Krupp AG Essen, Martin Bormann, Chief of the Nazi Party Chancellery, Dr. Hans Lammers, German State Secretary, and Adolf Hitler, in order to establish a legal mandate for the preservation of the Krupp family enterprise, so that Gustav's son and heir, Alfried Felix Alwyn von Bohlen und Halbach, would be heretofore, addressed as Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach. This law was signed by Adolf Hitler on 12 November 1943 and became effective immediately, thus transferring ownership from Bertha Krupp to the first male heir of Bertha Krupp and Gustav Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Erlaß des Führers über das Familienunternehmen der Firma Fried. Krupp, Reichsgesetzblatt 1943 I, 655f (scan)
  2. ^ "Correspondence: Telford Taylor to Eleanor Roosevelt". Retrieved 2008-08-14.