List of UP Aerospace launches

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UP Aerospace conducted its first launch on 25 September 2006 from Spaceport America in Upham, New Mexico. Since then, numerous other launches, mostly successful, have been conducted from the company's launch complex at Spaceport America. All launches are sub-orbital so that they do not complete one orbital revolution.

Launch Date (UTC) Vehicle Payload Launch pad Result Remarks
1 SL-1 September 25, 2006[1] SpaceLoft XL Various UA launch tower Failure The [unsuccessful] maiden launch of a SpaceLoft XL rocket by UP Aerospace.[2] It veered off course and lost control shortly after lift-off.[1]
2 SL-2 April 28, 2007 SpaceLoft XL Celestis-06 Legacy and other payloads UA launch tower Success

The first successful launch, a second Spaceloft XL, primarily carried cremated human remains, including those of astronaut Gordon Cooper and Star Trek actor James Doohan.[3]

3 December 19, 2007[4][5] Proprietary test vehicle Technology Demonstration UA launch tower Success Low-altitude atmospheric test flight not intended to reach space. Reached a maximum altitude of 2,500 feet.[4][5]
4 December 2007 [6] Space plane prototype[7] None UA launch tower Success Proprietary technology launch for Lockheed Martin.
5 August 12, 2008 [8] Space plane prototype None UA launch tower Success (Spaceport America & UP Aerospace view)[8] Anomalous (Lockheed-Martin view)[7] Proprietary technology launch for Lockheed Martin.
6 SL-3 May 2, 2009 [9] SpaceLoft XL New Mexico student payloads
Celestis-08 Discovery
UA launch tower Anomalous

"Education opportunity for New Mexico students to design experiments that use the environment of suborbital space to answer scientific and engineering questions".[10] The craft failed to reach space.[11][12]

7 August 4, 2009 [13] Black Watch[14] ground-launched UAV prototype [15] UA launch tower Success Test flight launch for Florida-based Moog-FTS.[13]
8 10 October 2009 [13] "reusable rocket plane"[16] Lockheed proprietary payload UA launch tower Success Test of "proprietary advanced launch technologies" for Lockheed Martin.[13]
9 SL-4 May 4, 2010 SpaceLoft XL Various, Celestis-09 Pioneer UA launch tower Success UP Aerospace successfully launched the 4th SpaceLoft Rocket 70 miles into space. The vehicle spent four minutes in the weightlessness of space before landing on the neighboring White Sands Missile Range.
10 SL-5 May 20, 2011 SpaceLoft XL Various, Celestis-10 Goddard UA launch tower Success The vehicle performed a flawless mission reaching a Spaceport America record setting altitude of 73.5 miles (118 km) into space.[17]
11 SL-6 April 5, 2012 SpaceLoft XL Various UA launch tower Success Included first launch of experimental payloads for NASA's Flight Opportunities Program, and Department of Defense experiments.[18]
12 SL-7 June 21, 2013 SpaceLoft XL NASA (Flight Opportunities Program), Celestis-12 Centennial UA launch tower Success First fully manifested launch for NASA's Flight Opportunities Program. Set new Spaceport America altitude record of 73.9 miles.[18]
13 SL-8 November 12, 2013 SpaceLoft XL NASA (Flight Opportunities Program) UA launch tower Success Second fully manifested launch for NASA's Flight Opportunities Program. Reached altitude of 384,100 feet (72.75 miles).[18]
14 SL-9 October 23, 2014 SpaceLoft XL NASA (Flight Opportunities Program), Celestis-13 Conestoga UA launch tower Success Third fully manifested launch for NASA's Flight Opportunities Program. Set new Spaceport America altitude record of 408,035 feet (124.369 km/77.25 miles).[18]
15 SL-10 November 6, 2015 SpaceLoft XL NASA (Flight Opportunities Program), Celestis-14 Tribute UA launch tower Success First private sounding rocket to demonstrate ejection of independently recovered payloads. Reached an altitude of 120.7 km (74.98 miles).[19]
16 SL-12 September 12, 2018 SpaceLoft XL NASA (Flight Opportunities Program) UA launch tower Success Three NASA technology demonstration payloads launched, an umbrella-like heat shield called Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT), the Suborbital Flight Environment Monitor (SFEM-3) and the Autonomous Flight Termination System (AFTS). Reached an altitude of 114 km (70.84 miles).[20]
17 SL-11 September 17, 2018 SpaceLoft XL NASA (Flight Opportunities Program), Celestis-15 Starseeker UA launch tower Success Sixth fully manifested launch for NASA's Flight Opportunities Program and Celestis-Mission Starseeker. Reached an altitude of 114 km (70.84 miles).[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b David, Leonard (2007-01-19). "UP Aerospace: Return to Flight in Progress". space.com. Retrieved 2008-07-24.
  2. ^ ""False Start" - The First Launch at Spaceport America". Check-Six. Retrieved 4 December 2015.
  3. ^ "Ashes of Star Trek's Scotty Fly to Space". Washington Post. Retrieved 2008-04-04.
  4. ^ a b "UP Aerospace launches test flight from spaceport". kob.com. Archived from the original on June 23, 2009. Retrieved 2008-04-05.
  5. ^ a b "Private Firm Launches Test Shot From Spaceport America". space.com. Retrieved 2008-04-05.
  6. ^ "Lockheed Martin signs agreement with NM Spaceport". New Mexico Business Weekly. 2008-04-15. Retrieved 2008-07-05.
  7. ^ a b David, Leonard (2008-08-15). "Space Plane Prototype Suffers Anomaly in Launch Test". Space.com.
  8. ^ a b "Up Aerospace, Lockheed Martin Launch" (Press release). New Mexico Spaceport Authority. 2008-08-13. Archived from the original on 2008-11-21. Retrieved 2008-08-13.
  9. ^ "Spaceport America Student Launch Program 2008–2009". New Mexico State University. 2009-03-16. Archived from the original on April 21, 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-21.
  10. ^ "Spaceport America Student Launch Program 2008–2009". New Mexico State University. 2009-03-16. Archived from the original on April 21, 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-21.
  11. ^ "Officials Praise NM Rocket Launch". KOAT. 2009-05-02. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved 2009-05-02.
  12. ^ "Rocket falls short of altitude goal at space port". KVIA.com. 2009-05-02. Archived from the original on May 10, 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-02.
  13. ^ a b c d "Lockheed Martin launches test vehicle from NM's Spaceport America". Las Cruces Sun-News. 2009-10-12. Archived from the original on 2009-10-16. Retrieved 2009-10-22.
  14. ^ Martin, Bob (2009-08-05). "Spaceport launches one, scrubs another". TV news video segment. KRQE channel 13. Retrieved 2009-10-22.
  15. ^ "Successful Launch From Spaceport America by Up Aerospace, MOOG-FTS" (Press release). Spaceport America. 2009-08-04. Retrieved 2009-10-22.
  16. ^ David, Leonard (2009-10-15). "Reusable Rocket Plane Soars in Test Flight". space.com. Retrieved 2009-10-22.
  17. ^ "Suborbital Rocket Launches Human Remains, Wedding Rings into Space".
  18. ^ a b c d "UP Aerospace Inc. - Past Missions". UP Aerospace Inc. Retrieved 23 June 2014.
  19. ^ "Spaceport America's 24th Launch – an UP Aerospace SpaceLoft Rocket Demonstrated the Capability to Eject Separate Payloads Requiring Independent Re-entry". Spaceport America. 6 November 2015. Archived from the original on 16 January 2016.
  20. ^ https://www.nasa.gov/centers/armstrong/features/nasa-tests-space-tech-on-up-aerospace-rocket.html
  21. ^ https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_lau/spaceloft.htm