List of miscellaneous works by Temple Moore

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Eleanor Cross in Sledmere, East Yorkshire

Temple Moore (1856–1920) was an English architect who practised from an office in London. He was born in Tullamore, Ireland, and was the son of an army officer. He was educated at Glasgow High School, then privately. In 1875, he was articled to George Gilbert Scott, Jr.. Moore set up an independent practice in 1878, but continued to work with Scott for some years, and completed some of his commissions. Moore's designs were mainly in Gothic Revival style, and although he worked in the later years of that tradition, his "artistic destiny was not to preserve an attenuating tradition but to bring to maturity a development which otherwise would have remained incomplete".[1] Temple Moore was mainly a church architect, designing some 40 new churches and restoring or making alterations and additions to other churches, but he also designed works of different types, including country houses, memorials, schools, parish halls, and a hospital. One of Moore's pupils was Giles Gilbert Scott. In 1919 Moore's son-in-law, Leslie Moore, became a partner, and he continued the work of the practice after Temple Moore's death at his home in Hampstead in 1920.[1]

This list contains a variety of works that are not included in the other lists of Morre's works, which all related to churches. They contain information about new churches, their restorations, additions, alterations, and their fittings and furnishings.

Key[edit]

Grade Criteria[2]
Grade I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important.
Grade II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest.
Grade II Buildings of national importance and special interest.

Works[edit]

Name Location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Beechwood and
The Beeches
Driffield,
East Riding of Yorkshire
54°00′05″N 0°25′43″W / 54.0014°N 0.4287°W / 54.0014; -0.4287 (Beechwood and The Beeches, Driffield)
1878 Extension to a house dating from about 1831.[3] II
The Quarry Oswestry, Shropshire
52°51′22″N 3°03′48″W / 52.8560°N 3.0634°W / 52.8560; -3.0634 (The Quarry, Oswestry)
1882–83 Temple Moore's first new house, in Norman Shaw's Old English style, the lower part in brick, the upper part half-timbered. Later used as a school.[4]
Highfield Driffield,
East Riding of Yorkshire
54°00′40″N 0°26′26″W / 54.0112°N 0.4406°W / 54.0112; -0.4406 (Highfield, Driffield)
1882–85 A house of 1864, remodelled by Temple Moore. Later used as a country club.[5] II
Pusey House St Giles', Oxford
51°45′24″N 1°15′37″W / 51.7566°N 1.2604°W / 51.7566; -1.2604 (Pusey House, Oxford)
PuseyHouseOxford.jpg 1886–1914 A religious institution named after Edward Bouverie Pusey, one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement, designed by Temple Moore, with the chapel added in 1914.[6][7] II
Holmwood House Redditch, Worcestershire
52°18′10″N 1°57′05″W / 52.3028°N 1.9514°W / 52.3028; -1.9514 (Holmwood House, Redditch)
1893 Built as a vicarage for Canon Horace Newton.[8][9] II*
Eleanor Cross Sledmere,
East Riding of Yorkshire
54°04′09″N 0°34′57″W / 54.06917°N 0.58248°W / 54.06917; -0.58248 (Eleanor cross, Sledmere)
Eleanor Cross Copy, Sledmere - geograph.org.uk - 1374989.jpg 1895 Designed by Temple Moore for Sir Tatton Sykes; later used as a memorial for the First World War.[1][10][11] II
Churchyard cross Sledmere,
East Riding of Yorkshire
54°04′07″N 0°34′49″W / 54.0685°N 0.5803°W / 54.0685; -0.5803 (Churchyard cross, Sledmere)
c. 1898 Designed by Temple Moore for Sir Tatton Sykes.[12][13] II
Treasurer's House York, North Yorkshire
53°57′47″N 1°04′51″W / 53.9630°N 1.0808°W / 53.9630; -1.0808 (Treasurer's House, York)
The Treasurer's House1.jpg Late 19th century Restored by Temple Moore.[1][14] I
Grays Court York, North Yorkshire
53°57′48″N 1°04′51″W / 53.9633°N 1.0808°W / 53.9633; -1.0808 (Grays Court, York)
Grey's Court - geograph.org.uk - 677001.jpg c. 1900 Restored by Temple Moore.[15] I
Town Hall Helmsley,
North Yorkshire
54°14′46″N 1°03′42″W / 54.2461°N 1.0618°W / 54.2461; -1.0618 (Town Hall, Helmsley)
Helmsley Town Hall.jpg 1901 In Queen Anne style, standing in the Market Place.[1][16][17] II
Bilbrough Manor Bilbrough, North Yorkshire
53°54′40″N 1°11′43″W / 53.9112°N 1.1953°W / 53.9112; -1.1953 (Bilbrough Manor)
1902 A country house built for Guy Thomas Fairfax.[18] II
St William's College York,
East Riding of Yorkshire
53°57′44″N 1°04′49″W / 53.9623°N 1.0802°W / 53.9623; -1.0802 (St William's College, York)
St.William's College - geograph.org.uk - 770193.jpg 1902 Restoration of a 15th-century college of the chantry priests of York Minster.[1][19][20] I
Gatehouse Eglingham Hall, Eglingham, Northumberland
55°28′11″N 1°50′11″W / 55.4698°N 1.8365°W / 55.4698; -1.8365 (Gatehouse, Eglingham Hall)
1903 The gateway was built in the 18th century and altered by Temple Moore in 1903.[21] [22][23] II
12–18 Petergate York, North Yorkshire
53°57′45″N 1°05′04″W / 53.9625°N 1.0845°W / 53.9625; -1.0845 (12–18 Petergate, York)
Shops in High Petergate - geograph.org.uk - 407973.jpg
c. 1905 A row of timber-framed houses, reconstructed by Temple Moore. Since used as an arts centre.[24] II
South Hill Park Bracknell, Berkshire
51°23′37″N 0°45′00″W / 51.3937°N 0.7500°W / 51.3937; -0.7500 (South Hill Park)
South Hill Park Mansion and Grounds.jpg 1906 A country house dating from the 18th century, remodelled for Lord Haversham.[1][25] [26][27] II
War memorial Coxwold, North Yorkshire
54°11′16″N 1°11′03″W / 54.18777°N 1.18416°W / 54.18777; -1.18416 (War memorial, Coxwold)
Coxwold War Memorial.jpg
1919 Designed by Temple Moore, erection supervised by Leslie Moore.[28] II
War Memorial St George's Churchyard, Pontesbury, Shropshire
52°38′55″N 2°53′19″W / 52.6487°N 2.8886°W / 52.6487; -2.8886 (War Memorial, Pontesbury)
1919–21 Ornate stone crucifix with additional figures of Virgin Mary, Mary Magdalene and St George; dismantled 1960[29] and replaced on site with plain cross.[30]
Churchyard cross Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire
52°18′23″N 0°35′32″W / 52.30639°N 0.59212°W / 52.30639; -0.59212 (Churchyard cross, Higham Ferrers)
St Mary, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire - Churchyard cross - geograph.org.uk - 826445.jpg
20th century The cross dates from the 14th century. Temple Moore added a capital depicting the Virgin and Child, and the Crucifixion.[31] I
Dalby Hall Dalby, Lincolnshire
53°12′33″N 0°06′38″E / 53.2091°N 0.1106°E / 53.2091; 0.1106 (Dalby Hall)
Dalby Hall, Dalby - geograph.org.uk - 815055.jpg Undated The hall dates from the 18th century, but was rebuilt in 1856 by James Fowler after being destroyed by fire. Temple Moore later made additions.[32] [33] II

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Goodhart-Rendel, H. S. (rev Geoffrey K. Brandwood) (2004), "Moore, Temple Lushington (1856–1920)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, retrieved 14 October 2012  ((subscription or UK public library membership required))
  2. ^ Listed Buildings, Historic England, retrieved 29 March 2015 
  3. ^ Historic England, "Beechwood and The Beeches, Driffield (1376789)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 12 October 2012 
  4. ^ Newman & Pevsner 2006, p. 458.
  5. ^ Historic England, "Highfield Country Club, Driffield (1244864)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 18 September 2012 
  6. ^ Historic England, "Pusey House, Oxford (1047109)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 6 September 2012 
  7. ^ Welcome, Pusey House, Oxford, retrieved 6 September 2012 
  8. ^ Brooks & Pevsner 2007, p. 558.
  9. ^ Historic England, "Holmwood House, Redditch (1348660)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 8 October 2012 
  10. ^ Pevsner & Neave 1995, pp. 692–693.
  11. ^ Historic England, "Eleanor Cross, Sledmere (1083806)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 6 September 2012 
  12. ^ Historic England, "Cross in St Mary's Churchyard approximately 1 metre to west of tower, Sledmere (1083801)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 6 September 2012 
  13. ^ Pevsner & Neave 1995, p. 692.
  14. ^ Historic England, "Treasurer's House and attached garden walls, gate and gate piers, York (1257251)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 20 September 2012 
  15. ^ Historic England, "Gray's Court and garden gates and piers attached to south-east corner, York (1257248)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 20 September 2012 
  16. ^ Pevsner 1966b, p. 187.
  17. ^ Historic England, "Town Hall, Helmsley (1308328)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 5 October 2012 
  18. ^ Historic England, "Bilbrough Manor (1316670)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 5 October 2012 
  19. ^ Pevsner & Neave 1995, pp. 208–209.
  20. ^ Historic England, "St William's College, York (1258028)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 20 September 2012 
  21. ^ Pevsner & Neave 1995, p. 444.
  22. ^ Historic England, "Gateway and stable range with attached wall to north of Eglingham Hall (1041972)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 6 September 2012 
  23. ^ Grundy et al. 1992, p. 265.
  24. ^ Historic England, "12–18 Petergate, York (1257600)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 20 September 2012 
  25. ^ Pevsner 1966a, p. 96.
  26. ^ Historic England, "South Hill Park, Bracknell (1390348)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 13 October 2012 
  27. ^ Historic England, "South Hill Park, Bracknell (1000591)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 13 October 2012 
  28. ^ Historic England, "Coxwold War Memorial within the churchyard of Saint Michael's Church, Coxwold (1391072)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 12 October 2012 
  29. ^ Francis, Peter (2013). Shropshire War Memorials, Sites of Remembrance. YouCaxton Publications. p. 57. ISBN 978-1-909644-11-3. 
  30. ^ Newman & Pevsner 2006, p. 475.
  31. ^ Historic England, "Churchyard Cross approximately 8 metres west of Chantry Chapel of All Souls, Higham Ferrers (1040360)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 8 September 2012 
  32. ^ Pevsner, Harris & Antram 1989, p. 247.
  33. ^ Historic England, "Dalby Hall (1063662)", National Heritage List for England (NHLE), retrieved 6 September 2012 

Bibliography[edit]