List of missing people organizations

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This is a list of missing people organizations grouped by international or United States location. A missing person is a person who has disappeared, and whose status as alive or dead cannot be confirmed as their location and fate is not believed known.

International[edit]

Visual representation created by Missing Children Europe for the 116000 European network of missing children hotlines
  • INTERPOL is involved in missing person cases through the maintenance of an International Missing Persons Database.[1] The database is populated by INTERPOL member countries through the use of yellow notices. INTERPOL Notices are international requests for cooperation or alerts allowing police in member countries to share critical crime-related information.[2] In missing person cases a Yellow Notice can be requested by any member country. They are designed to help locate missing persons, often minors, or to help identify persons who are unable to identify themselves. Where a member country requests it, the Yellow Notice is published to the web and can be linked to the INTERPOL suite of border management tools. This will trigger an alert in the event of anyone with a yellow notice crossing a connected border point.
  • The International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children works with INTERPOL, law enforcement, and elected officials worldwide to combat child pornography and abduction.[3][4][5][6][7]
  • International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement through their FamilyLinks website they help track people who are missing after a natural disaster or displaced by war to re-unite with their families.[8]
  • Tie A Ribbon: Online directory raising awareness for missing people in the United Kingdom.[9]
  • The International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP), a treaty-based international organization with Headquarters in The Hague, the Netherlands. Its mandate is to secure the cooperation of governments and others in locating missing persons from conflict, human rights abuses, disasters, organized crime, irregular migration and other causes and to assist them in doing so. It is the only international organization tasked exclusively to work on the issue of missing persons.[10]

United States[edit]

  • LostNMissing Inc[11] is an all volunteer state and federally recognized 501(c)3 Non-Profit charitable organization to assist law enforcement and the families of missing. They never charge a fee for services and are dependent upon public donations. All Support Members, Board of Directors, Officers and Owner are Volunteers.
  • National Missing and Unidentified Persons System or NamUs[12] is a clearinghouse for missing persons and unidentified decedent records in the United States, a part of the Department of Justice.
  • The Doe Network contains both unidentified and missing persons cases.[13]
  • Missing Persons Support Center [14]
  • St. Louis Missing Persons Inc
  • The Missing and Unidentified Persons Unit is part of the California Department of Justice.[15] They help local agencies with identifying unknown, and locating missing persons.
  • Destiny Search Project - Is an all volunteer nonprofit based in Utah that provides services to families, law enforcement, and other groups engaged in a search for a missing person. This includes Volunteer Based Search Operations, Law Enforcement Support, Resource/Logistics Management, Public Information/Affairs, Social Media Management, and Family Support Services.[16]
  • Be United Missing Persons Inc[17] Be United is an all volunteer state and federally recognized 501(c)3 Non-Profit charitable organization to assist law enforcement and helping the families of the lost and missing. They never charge a fee for services and are dependent upon public donations. All Support Members, Officers and Founders are Volunteers. Be United Missing Persons http://www.be-united.org

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.interpol.int/notice/search/missing
  2. ^ http://www.interpol.int/INTERPOL-expertise/Notices
  3. ^ Donald F. Sprague (2012). Investigating Missing Children Cases: A Guide for First Responders and Investigators. CRC Press. pp. 167–68. ISBN 1439860637.
  4. ^ Babak Akhgar; Andrew Staniforth; Francesca Bosco (2014). Cyber Crime and Cyber Terrorism Investigator's Handbook. Syngress. p. 138. ISBN 0128008113.
  5. ^ "Contact Us". ICMEC. Archived from the original on 2015-02-14.
  6. ^ "Spotlight". The Technology Coalition.
  7. ^ "About the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children". ICMEC. Archived from the original on 2015-02-14.
  8. ^ familylinks.icrc.org
  9. ^ tie-a-ribbon.co.uk Archived 2013-08-15 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ "ICMP International Commission on Missing Persons". www.icmp.int. Retrieved 2019-09-17.
  11. ^ lostnmissing.com
  12. ^ namus.gov
  13. ^ http://www.doenetwork.org
  14. ^ http://www.mpsc2017.org
  15. ^ https://oag.ca.gov/missing
  16. ^ "Destiny Search Project – Rapid Community Based Volunteer Missing Person Searches". Retrieved 2019-07-14.
  17. ^ [1]