List of works by Arthur Ashley Sykes

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This is a list of the publications of Arthur Ashley Sykes (1684–1756), an English cleric who wrote controversial pamphlets over three or four decades, arguing a latitudinarian and rationalist line, and playing a part in the Bangorian controversy.

Year Full title Published as (Sykes or otherwise) Comments
1710 Some modest animadversions and reflexions upon a sermon preach'd before the Honourable House of Commons, by Dr. West, on Monday, the 30th of January: being the day appointed to be kept, as the day of the martyrdom of the blessed King Charles I. In a letter to the abovesaid Doctor[1] Eugenius Philalethes[2] Not in Disney's catalogue. A sermon of 30 January 1710 by Richard West had proved controversial in its views (pan-Protestant, Whig in its politics, and in favour of continuing the War of the Spanish Succession), and had required a vote in Parliament before it was printed.[3]
1712 An answer to that part of Dr. Brett's sermon which relates to the incapacity of persons not episcopally ordain'd to administer Christian baptism: In a letter to the Doctor[4] Anonymous[5] The reference is to Thomas Brett.
1715 The innocency of error, asserted and vindicated[6] Eugenius Philalethes Later editions in 1715 and 1729.[7]
1715 The safety of the church under the present ministry consider'd: in a letter to —[8] By a clergyman
1716 An answer to the nonjurors charge of schism upon the Church of England[9] A Clergyman of the Church of England
1716 The external peace of the church: only attainable by a zeal for Scripture in its just latitude, and by mutual charity; not by a pretense of uniformity of opinion[10] By a lover of truth and peace[11]
1716 The suspension of the Triennial Bill, the properest means to unite the nation: In a letter to —[12] Sykes Sykes expressed the view that a Whig parliament was by no means guaranteed without royal help.[13]
1716 The Thanks of an honest clergyman for Mr. Paul's speech at Tybourn, July the 13th, 1716[14] Sykes Reference is to William Paul. Sykes contested Paul's claim to die as a nonjuror martyr.[15]
1717 The difference between the Kingdom of Christ, and the kingdoms of this world: set forth in a sermon preached at the arch-deacon's visitation, in St. Michael's Church in Cambridge, December 13, 1716[16] Sykes
1717 A letter to a friend. In which is shewn, the inviolable nature of publick securities[17] By a lover of his country Reprinted by John Ramsay McCulloch.[18]
1717 Some remarks on Mr. Marshall's defense of our constitution in church and state. With an appendix. Containing a brief enquiry into the meaning of those words of the 20th article, the church hath - authority in controversies of faith[19] Sykes The reference is to Nathaniel Marshall.
1717 A letter to the Reverend Dr. Sherlock, one of the Committee of Convocation, appointed to draw up a representation concerning the Bishop of Bangor's Preservative and sermon: Comparing the dangerous positions and doctrines contained in the Doctor's sermon, preach'd November 5th, 1712, with those charged upon the Bishop in the late report of the Committee[20] Sykes To Thomas Sherlock, who answered Sykes.[21]
1717 A second letter to the Reverend Dr. Sherlock,: being a reply to his Answer, &c. Proving the doctrines maintain'd by the doctor in his sermon Nov. 5. 1712. to be the same with those charged upon the Bishop of Bangor, as pernicious, in the late report of the Committee. With an appendix relating to a passage or two in Dr. Snape's Second letter to the Lord Bishop of Bangor[22] Sykes with postscript by Hoadly. The reference is to Andrew Snape.
1717 A third letter to the Reverend Dr. Sherlock,: being an answer to his considerations offered to the Bishop of Bangor. With an appendix, in vindication of a passage in the former letter against Dr. Snape[23] Sykes Sykes claimed Sherlock had not clarified the differences between what Hoadly now preached and what he (Sherlock) had preached in the past.[24]
1718 A fourth letter to the Reverend Dr. Sherlock, being an answer to his late book, entitled, The Lord Bishop of B's defence of his assertion consider'd[25] Sykes "...a tenacious, if pedantic, catalogue of charges against Sherlock of malice and misrepresenting Hoadly..."[26]
1718 A Modest Plea for the Baptismal and Scripture-notion of the Trinity. Wherein the Schemes of the Reverend Dr Bennet and Dr Clarke are Compared. Also Two Letters[27] Sykes Sykes was writing in support of Samuel Clarke's line on the Trinity, against an attack of 1718 by Thomas Bennet.[28] in A Discourse of the Ever-Blessed Trinity in Unity (1718).[29]
1719 The case of Dr. Bentley Regius Professor of Divinity truly stated: Wherein two late pamphlets, entituled The proceedings of the Vice-Chancellor and the University, &c. And A full and impartial account of the late proceedings, &c. are examined[30] Anonymous[31] References are to Thomas Sherlock as vice-chancellor and Conyers Middleton.[32]
1719 The case of Dr. Bentley Regius Professor of Divinity farther stated, and vindicated. In answer to A second part of the full and impartial account of the proceedings, &c.[33] Anonymous
1720 The authority of the clergy and the liberties of the laity stated and vindicated. In answer to Mr. Rogers's discourse of the visible and invisible church of Christ.[34] Sykes The reference is to John Rogers, who wrote Discourse of the Visible and Invisible Church of Christ in the Bangorian controversy; Rogers replied in 1722.[35]
1721 The case of subscription to the XXXIX articles considered. Occasioned by Dr Waterland's Case of Arian subscription[36] Anonymous[37] Reference is to Daniel Waterland.
1721 A letter to the Right Honourable the Earl of Nottingham. Occasioned by a late motion made by the Archdeacon of London, at his visitation for the city clergy to return their thanks to his Lordship for his answer to Mr. Whiston[38] A curate of London.[39]
1722 The consequences of the present conspiracy to the Church and State, considered, in a sermon preach'd at the Chapel in King-Street, near Golden Square, upon November 5, 1722[40] Sykes
1725 An essay upon the truth of the Christian religion: wherein its real foundation upon the Old Testament is shewn: Occasioned by The discourse of the grounds and reasons of the Christian religion[41] Sykes Reply to Anthony Collins.
1727 The true grounds of the expectation of the Messiah. In two letters. The one printed in the London Journal, April the first, 1727. The other in vindication of it. Being a reply to the answer published at the end of a late letter to Dr. Rogers[42] Philalethes
1728 The duty of love to God, and to our neighbours. A sermon preach'd at the assizes held at Chelmsford in Essex, March 21. 1727-8[43] Sykes
1728 A sermon preach'd at the assizes held at Brentwood in Essex, August 7. 1728: Before the Right Honourable The Lord Chief Justice Eyre, and Mr. Baron Hale[44] Sykes The references are to Sir Robert Eyre and Sir Bernard Hale.
1730 The true foundations of natural and reveal'd religion asserted: Being a reply to the supplement to the treatise entitul'd, The nature, obligation, &c. of the Christian sacraments[45] Sykes Reply to Daniel Waterland. Thomas Johnson[46] replied anonymously to this work and one by Thomas Chubb.[47]
1730 A defence of the answer to the remarks upon Dr. Clarke's exposition of the church-catechism. Wherein the difference between moral and positive duties is fully stated. Being a reply to a pamphlet entitled, The nature, obligation, and efficacy of the sacraments consider'd[48] Anonymous[49] Reply to Daniel Waterland.
1730 An Answer to the Remarks Upon Dr Clarke's Exposition of the Church-Catechism[50] Anonymous[51] Reply to Daniel Waterland.
1731 An answer to the postscript of the second part of Scripture vindicated. Wherein is shewn, that if reason be not a sufficient guide in matters of religion; the bulk of mankind, for 4000 years, had no sufficient guide at all in matters of religion[52] Anonymous[53]
1732 A dissertation on the eclipse mentioned by Phlegon. Or, an enquiry whether that eclipse had any relation to the darkness which happened at our Saviour's passion[54] Sykes On the Crucifixion darkness and eclipse, and Phlegon of Tralles. The work was provoked by William Whiston, who related in his Memoir of Samuel Clarke how Sykes had persuaded Clarke to remove reference to the eclipse in Clarke's published Boyle Lectures; Sykes took the eclipse to be a coincidental natural event, as was the earthquake reported at the Crucifixion, an attitude (Whiston wrote) that was prejudice without proper support.[55] Whiston first replied to Sykes in 1732.[56]
1733 A defence of the dissertation on the eclipse mentioned by Phlegon: wherein is further shewn, that that eclipse had no relation to the darkness which happened at our Saviour's passion: and Mr. Whiston's observations are particularly considered[57] Sykes The reference is to William Whiston. In A reply to Dr. Sykes's Defence of his dissertation on the eclipse mentioned by Phlegon, one of his Six Dissertations (1734) dealing with Sykes's claim, Whiston mentions the secular acceleration of the Moon, as studied by Edmond Halley; this astronomical sidelight in a theological controversy was picked up only by George Costard at the time.[58]
1734 A second defence of the dissertation upon the eclipse mentioned by Phlegon: wherein Mr. Chapman's objections, and those of the A. of the letter to Dr. Sykes, are particularly considered[59] Sykes One reply to the first work on Phlegon was anonymous (1733);[60] the author's name has been given as Douglass.[61] The other reference is to John Chapman, who published works in the controversy in 1734 and 1735.[62][63]
1734 The reasons alledged against Dr. Rundle's promotion to the See of Glocester, seriously and dispassionately considered: in a letter to a member of Parliament for the county of —[64] By a gentleman of the Temple Reply by Isaac Maddox, as "A clergyman in the country".[65][66]
1735 Some further considerations on the reasons alledged against Dr. Rundle's promotion to the See of Glocester: in a second letter to a member of parliament for the County of —[67] A Gentleman of the Temple The reference is to Thomas Rundle.
1736 The corporation and test acts shewn to be of no importance to the Church of England[68] Anonymous[69]
1737 An enquiry into the meaning of Demoniacks in the New Testament[70] T.P.A.P.O.A.B.I.T.C.O.S. (i.e. The Precentor And Prebendary Of Alton-Borealis In The Church Of Sarum). This and the sequel had a reply[71] that has been attributed to John Swinton[72] and George Costard.[73] Another anonymous reply[74] was by Thomas Church.[75]
1737 A further enquiry into the meaning of Demoniacks in the New Testament. Wherein the enquiry is vindicated against the objections of the Revd. Mr. Twells, and of the author of The Essay in answer to it[76] Anonymous The reference is to Leonard Twells. Other publications in the controversy were by Samuel Pegge and Thomas Hutchinson.[77]
1740 Principles and connexion of natural and revealed religion distinctly considered[78] Sykes On prophecy and miracles, two central topics of the apologetics of the time, it took the view that prophecy is more convincing; this position was unorthodox and was criticised.[79]
1742 A Brief Discourse Concerning the Credibility of Miracles and Revelation: To which is added, a postscript in answer to the Lord Bishop of Lichfield's charge to his clergy[80][81] Sykes The Bishop of Lichfield at the time was Richard Smalbroke.
1744 An examination of Mr. Warburton's account of the conduct of the antient legislators : of the double doctrine of the old philosophers, of the theocracy of the Jews, and of Sir Isaac Newton's Chronology[82] Sykes
1746 An enquiry how far Papists ought to be treated here as good subjects: and, how far they are chargeable with the tenets commonly imputed to them[83] Anonymous[84]
1746 A Defence of the Examination of Mr. Warburton's account of the theocracy of the Jews, being an answer to his remarks, so far as they concern Dr. Sykes,...[85] Sykes The title refers to William Warburton's The Divine Legation of Moses. John Towne (anonymous[86]), supported by Warburton, attempted to cap off the controversy in 1748.[87]
1748 An Essay on the Nature, Design, and Origin, of Sacrifices[88] Anonymous[89]
1748 English liberty in some cases worse than French slavery: exemplified by animadversions upon the tyrannical and anti-constitutional power of the justices of the peace, commissioners of excise, customs, and land-tax, &c. containing methods made use of in raising the land-tax of this kingdom, compared with the Taillé and Taillon, the most oppressive in France[90] Anonymous, signed Philalethes
1756 The Scripture Doctrine of the Redemption of Man by Jesus Christ: In Two Parts[91] Sykes
1857 edition An enquiry when the resurrection of the body, or flesh, was first inserted into the public creeds[92] Translated by his brother G. Sykes

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1710). Some modest animadversions and reflexions upon a sermon preach'd before the Honourable House of Commons, by Dr. West, on Monday, the 30th of January: being the day appointed to be kept, as the day of the martyrdom of the blessed King Charles I. In a letter to the abovesaid Doctor. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  2. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1710). Some modest animadversions and reflexions upon a sermon preach'd before the honourable House of Commons, by Doctor West, on Monday, the 30th of January, ... In a letter to the abovesaid Doctor. By Eugenius Philalethes. printed, in the year. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  3. ^ Pasi Ihalainen (2005). Protestant nations redefined: changing perceptions of national identity in the rhetoric of the English, Dutch, and Swedish public churches, 1685-1772. Brill. p. 247. ISBN 978-90-04-14485-9. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  4. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1712). An answer to that part of Dr. Brett's sermon which relates to the incapacity of persons not episcopally ordain'd to administer Christian baptism: In a letter to the Doctor. Printed by W.D. for John Morphew. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  5. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1 p. 119.
  6. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1715). The innocency of error, asserted and vindicated. J. Wyat. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  7. ^ John Disney (1785). Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Arthur Ashley Sykes. J. Johnson. pp. xi–xxiv. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  8. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1715). The safety of the church under the present ministry consider'd: in a letter to -. printed for R. Burleigh. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  9. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1716). An answer to the nonjurors charge of schism upon the Church of England. Printed for James Knapton, at the Crown in St. Paul's Church-Yard. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  10. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1716). The external peace of the church: only attainable by a zeal for Scripture in its just latitude, and by mutual charity; not by a pretense of uniformity of opinion. Printed for J. Baker. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  11. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  12. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1716). The suspension of the Triennial Bill, the properest means to unite the nation: In a letter to. Printed for James Knapton, at the Crown in St. Paul's Church-Yard. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  13. ^ John Alexander Wilson Gunn (1 July 1983). Beyond Liberty and Property: the process of self-recognition in eighteenth-century political thought. McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP. p. 149. ISBN 978-0-7735-1006-7. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  14. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1716). The Thanks of an honest clergyman for Mr. Paul's speech at Tybourn, July the 13th, 1716. E. Burleigh. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  15. ^ Cornwall, Robert D. "Paul, William". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/21608.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  16. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1717). The difference between the Kingdom of Christ, and the kingdoms of this world: set forth in a sermon preached at the arch-deacon's visitation, in St. Michael's Church in Cambridge, December 13, 1716. Printed for James Knapton. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  17. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1717). A letter to a friend. In which is shewn, the inviolable nature of publick securities. By a lover of his country. printed for R. Burleigh. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  18. ^ John Ramsay McCulloch (1966). A select collection of scarce and valuable tracts and other publications on the national debt and the sinking fund. A.M. Kelley. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  19. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1717). Some remarks on Mr. Marshall's defense of our constitution in church and state. With an appendix. Containing a brief enquiry into the meaning of those words of the 20th article, the church hath - authority in controversies of faith. printed for James Knapton. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  20. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1717). A letter to the Reverend Dr. Sherlock, one of the Committee of Convocation, appointed to draw up a representation concerning the Bishop of Bangor's Preservative and sermon: Comparing the dangerous positions and doctrines contained in the Doctor's sermon, preach'd November 5th, 1712, with those charged upon the Bishop in the late report of the Committee. Printed, and sold by R. Burleigh, in Amen-Corner. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  21. ^ An answer to a letter sent to the Reverend Dr. Sherlock etc. relating to his sermon preach'd before the Lord-Mayor, November the 5th, 1712 : to which are added some observations upon the account the Lord Bishop of Bangor has given to his intended answer to the representation (1717)
  22. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes; Benjamin Hoadly (1717). A second letter to the Reverend Dr. Sherlock,: being a reply to his Answer, &c. Proving the doctrines maintain'd by the doctor in his sermon Nov. 5. 1712. to be the same with those charged upon the Bishop of Bangor, as pernicious, in the late report of the Committee. With an appendix relating to a passage or two in Dr. Snape's Second letter to the Lord Bishop of Bangor. Printed for James Knapton at the Crown, and Tim. Childe, at the White Hart in St. Paul's Church-yard. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  23. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1717). A third letter to the Reverend Dr. Sherlock: being an answer to his considerations offered to the Bishop of Bangor. With an appendix, in vindication of a passage in the former letter against Dr. Snape. Printed for James Knapton, at the Crown, and Timothy Childe, at the White-Hart in St. Paul's Church-Yard. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  24. ^ Starkie, p. 81; Google Books.
  25. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1718). A fourth letter to the Reverend Dr. Sherlock, being an answer to his late book, entitled, The Lord Bishop of B's defence of his assertion consider'd. Printed for J. Knapton: and T. Childe. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  26. ^ Starkie, p. 89; Google Books.
  27. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (20 October 2010). A Modest Plea for the Baptismal and Scripture-notion of the Trinity. Wherein the Schemes of the Reverend Dr Bennet and Dr Clarke are Compared. Also Two Letters. BiblioBazaar. ISBN 978-1-170-77701-5. Retrieved 17 March 2012. 
  28. ^ Thomas Bennet (1 September 2010). A Discourse of the Everblessed Trinity in Unity: With an Examination of Dr. Clarke's Scripture Doctrine of the Trinity. Nabu Press. ISBN 978-1-178-19618-4. Retrieved 17 March 2012. 
  29. ^ Thomas C. Pfizenmaier, The Trinitarian Theology of Dr. Samuel Clarke (1675-1729): Context, sources, and controversy (1997), p. 189; Google Books.
  30. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1719). The case of Dr. Bentley Regius Professor of Divinity truly stated: Wherein two late pamphlets, entituled The proceedings of the Vice-Chancellor and the University, &c. And A full and impartial account of the late proceedings, &c. are examined. Printed for James Roberts in Warwick Lane. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  31. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1
  32. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1
  33. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1719). The case of Dr. Bentley Regius Professor of Divinity farther stated, and vindicated. In answer to A second part of the full and impartial account of the proceedings, &c. printed for James Roberts. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  34. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1720). The authority of the clergy and the liberties of the laity stated and vindicated. In answer to Mr. Rogers's discourse of the visible and invisible church of Christ. printed for James Knapton. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  35. ^ John Rogers (1722). A Review of a Discourse of the Visible and Invisible Church of Christ, a reply to Mr. Sykes's answer to that discourse. Retrieved 9 March 2012. 
  36. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1721). The case of subscription to the XXXIX articles considered. Occasioned by Dr Waterland's Case of Arian subscription. Printed for James Knapton, at the Crown in St. Paul's Church-yard. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  37. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  38. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1721). A letter to the Right Honourable the Earl of Nottingham. Occasioned by a late motion made by the Archdeacon of London, at his visitation for the city clergy to return their thanks to his Lordship for his answer to Mr. Whiston. By a curate of London. Printed for J. Roberts. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  39. ^ Dictionary, p. 311; Google Books.
  40. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1722). The consequences of the present conspiracy to the Church and State, considered, in a sermon preach'd at the Chapel in King-Street, near Golden Square, upon November 5, 1722. J. Knapton. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  41. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1725). An essay upon the truth of the Christian religion: wherein its real foundation upon the Old Testament is shewn: Occasioned by The discourse of the grounds and reasons of the Christian religion. Printed for James and John Knapton. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  42. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1727). The true grounds of the expectation of the Messiah. In two letters. The one printed in the London Journal, April the first, 1727. The other in vindication of it. Being a reply to the answer published at the end of a late letter to Dr. Rogers. printed for J. Peele. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  43. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1728). The duty of love to God, and to our neighbours. A sermon preach'd at the assizes held at Chelmsford in Essex, March 21. 1727-8. Printed by J. Darby and T. Browne; for Samuel Lobb in Chelmsford. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  44. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1728). A sermon preach'd at the assizes held at Brentwood in Essex, August 7. 1728: Before the Right Honourable The Lord Chief Justice Eyre, and Mr. Baron Hale. By Arthur Ashley Sykes, D.D. Rector of Rayleigh in Essex, and Chantor of the Church of Sarum. printed for James and John Knapton, at the Crown in St. Paul's Church-Yard. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  45. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1730). The true foundations of natural and reveal'd religion asserted: Being a reply to the supplement to the treatise entitul'd, The nature, obligation, &c. of the Christian sacraments. J. and J. Knapton. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  46. ^ Thomas Johnson (1731). An essay on moral obligation: with a view towards settling the controversy, concerning moral and positive duties in answer to two late pamphlets, the one entitled, The true foundation of natural and revealed religion asserted being a reply to the supplement to the treatise on the Christian sacraments, the other [long dash] Some reflections upon the comparative excellency and usefulness of moral and positive duties by Mr. Chubb. Printed by J.S. for W. Thurlbourn bookseller in Cambridge and sold by J. and J. Knapton ... and J. Stephens. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  47. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  48. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1730). A defence of the answer to the remarks upon Dr. Clarke's exposition of the church-catechism. Wherein the difference between moral and positive duties is fully stated. Being a reply to a pamphlet entitled, The nature, obligation, and efficacy of the sacraments consider'd. Printed for J. and J. Knapton. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  49. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  50. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (24 June 2010). An Answer to the Remarks Upon Dr Clarke's Exposition of the Church-Catechism. BiblioBazaar. ISBN 978-1-171-14335-2. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  51. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  52. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1731). An answer to the postscript of the second part of Scripture vindicated. Wherein is shewn, that if reason be not a sufficient guide in matters of religion; the bulk of mankind, for 4000 years, had no sufficient guide at all in matters of religion. Printed for James and John Knapton. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  53. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  54. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1732). A dissertation on the eclipse mentioned by Phlegon. Or, an enquiry whether that eclipse had any relation to the darkness which happened at our Saviour's passion. printed for James and John Knapton, at the Crown in St. Paul's Church-yard. Retrieved 17 March 2012. 
  55. ^ John M. Steele (31 March 2012). Ancient Astronomical Observations and the Study of the Moon's Motion (1691-1757). Springer. p. 27. ISBN 978-1-4614-2148-1. Retrieved 17 March 2012. 
  56. ^ William Whiston (1732). The Testimony Of Phlegon Vindicated: Or, An Account Of the great Darkness and Earthquake at our Savior's Passion, described by Phlegon: Including all the Testimonies, both Heathen and Christian, in the very Words of the original Authors, during the first Six Centuries of Christianity ; With proper Observations on those Testimonies. Gyles. Retrieved 17 March 2012. 
  57. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1733). A defence of the dissertation on the eclipse mentioned by Phlegon: wherein is further shewn, that that eclipse had no relation to the darkness which happened at our Saviour's passion: and Mr. Whiston's observations are particularly considered. printed for James, John, and Paul Knapton, at the Crown in Ludgate-Street. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  58. ^ John M. Steele (31 March 2012). Ancient Astronomical Observations and the Study of the Moon's Motion (1691-1757). Springer. p. 23. ISBN 978-1-4614-2148-1. Retrieved 17 March 2012. 
  59. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1734). A second defence of the dissertation upon the eclipse mentioned by Phlegon: wherein Mr. Chapman's objections, and those of the A. of the letter to Dr. Sykes, are particularly considered. Printed for James, John, and Paul Knapton. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  60. ^ Phlegon's testimony shewn to relate to the darkness which happened at our Saviour's passion: In a letter to Dr. Sykes.. printed for S. Wilmot in Oxford: and sold by Messieurs Knaptons, W. Innys, T. Astley, and J. Crownfield in St. Paul's Church-Yard; C. Hitch and J. Batley in Paternoster-Row; and B. Motte in Fleet-Street. 1733. Retrieved 17 March 2012. 
  61. ^ Dictionary, vol.3 col. 1904; archive.org.
  62. ^ John Chapman (1734). Phlegon examined critically and impartially: In answer to the late Dissertation and Defence of Dr. Sykes. To which is added a postscript, explaining a passage in Tertullian. printed at the University Press for Cornelius Crownfield: and John Crownfield, at the Rising Sun in St. Paul's Church-Yard. London. Retrieved 17 March 2012. 
  63. ^ John Chapman (1735). Phlegon re-examined:: in answer to Dr. Sykes's Second defense of his dissertation concerning Phlegon. To which is added a postscript, concerning the Chronicon paschale. printed at the University-Press for Cornelius Crownfield: and John Crownfield, at the Rising-Sun in St. Paul's Church-Yard. London. Retrieved 17 March 2012. 
  64. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1734). The reasons alledged against Dr. Rundle's promotion to the See of Glocester, seriously and dispassionately considered: in a letter to a member of Parliament for the county of —. Printed for J. Roberts. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  65. ^ Isaac Maddox (1734). The case of Dr. Rundle's promotion to the See of Glocester impartially considered: or, Some remarks on a late pamphlet entituled The reasons alledged against Dr. Rundle's promotion to the See of Glocester seriously and dispassionately considered, in a letter to a member of parliament, &c. Printed for T. Cooper. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  66. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  67. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1735). Some further considerations on the reasons alledged against Dr. Rundle's promotion to the See of Glocester: in a second letter to a member of parliament for the County of —. Printed for J. Roberts. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  68. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1736). The corporation and test acts shewn to be of no importance to the Church of England. Printed for J. Roberts. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  69. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  70. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1737). An enquiry into the meaning of Demoniacks in the New Testament. printed for J. Roberts. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  71. ^ John Swinton (January 2010). A Critical Dissertation Concerning the Words ΔΑΊΜΩΝ and ΔΑΙΜΌΝΙΟΝ; Occasion'd by Two Late Enquiries Into the Meaning of Demoniacks in the New. General Books LLC. ISBN 978-1-152-01393-3. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  72. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  73. ^ DNB
  74. ^ Thomas Church (1737). An essay towards vindicating the literal sense of the demoniacks in the New Testament in answer to a late enquiry into the meaning of them. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  75. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  76. ^ A further enquiry into the meaning of Demoniacks in the New Testament. Wherein the enquiry is vindicated against the objections of the Revd. Mr. Twells, and of the author of The Essay in answer to it. Printed for J. Roberts. 1737. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  77. ^ H. C. Erik Midelfort (28 July 2005). Exorcism and Enlightenment: Johann Joseph Gassner and the demons of eighteenth-century Germany. Yale University Press. pp. 180–. ISBN 978-0-300-10669-5. Retrieved 23 March 2012. 
  78. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1740). Principles and connexion of natural and revealed religion distinctly considered. J. and P. Knapton. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  79. ^ Michael A. Stewart (1991). Studies in the philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment. Oxford University Press. p. 197 note 17. ISBN 978-0-19-824966-5. Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  80. ^ archive.org.
  81. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (August 2010). A Brief Discourse Concerning the Credibility of Miracles and Revelation: To which Is Added, a Postscript in Answer to the Lord Bishop of Lichfield's. Nabu Press. ISBN 978-1-178-16564-7. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  82. ^ archive.org.
  83. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1746). An enquiry how far Papists ought to be treated here as good subjects: and, how far they are chargeable with the tenets commonly imputed to them. Printed for J. and P. Knapton, at the Crown in Ludgate-Street. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  84. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  85. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1746). A Defence of the Examination of Mr. Warburton's account of the theocracy of the Jews, being an answer to his remarks, so far as they concern Dr. Sykes,... P. Knapton. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  86. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  87. ^ A critical inquiry into the opinions and practice of the ancient philosophers, concerning the nature of the soul and a future state, and their method of the double doctrine (1748)
  88. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (2010). An Essay on the Nature, Design, and Origin, of Sacrifices. BiblioLife. ISBN 978-1-170-58461-3. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  89. ^ Dictionary, vol. 1.
  90. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes; Philalethes Philalethes (August 2011). English Liberty in Some Cases Worse Than French Slavery. BiblioBazaar. ISBN 978-1-178-53354-5. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  91. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (February 2010). The Scripture Doctrine of the Redemption of Man by Jesus Christ: In Two Parts (1756). Kessinger Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-160-02165-4. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  92. ^ Arthur Ashley Sykes (1857). An enquiry when the resurrection of the body, or flesh, was first inserted into the public creeds. Retrieved 16 March 2012.