Liverpool College of Music

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Liverpool College of Music was an academy for classical musicians that existed between around 1884 and 1911, originally at 11 Hardman Street. The building was first known as the Meyerbeer Hall and was opened on 31 December 1867.[1] It was also used by Liverpool Spiritualist Church from 4 June 1876 to 1885[2][3]before becoming the College. By 2020 the building had become the 'Hard Wok Café'.

11 Hardman Street, Liverpool

The College appeared to change name and location numerous times. Although some records refer to 'since 1884' and others to 'established in 1895', there is a report of the 'new Music School, Liverpool (limited)' opening on 21 January 1892,[4] and also a tenth-anniversary concert (for the College) on 10 November 1902.[5] The decision to change from 'School' to 'College' was taken around May 1896.[6]

During its existence, the College moved first to 98 Upper Parliament Street (a building whose freehold had been bought in 1880 by the Liverpool Art Club Building Co., Ltd to rent out, originally, to Liverpool Art Club; it was renovated in 1881 to incorporate a new 60 ft gallery designed by W. & G. Audsley, who were LAC members),[7][8] and then, sometime after 1895, to Canning Street.[9][10] A directory from 1900 shows the Liverpool College of Music (Ltd) registered at 98 Upper Parliament Street, while Hardman Street is instead shown as home of the Liverpool Conservatoire of Music (also run by Alex J. Phipps: see below). A Liverpool Institute of Music (in Mount Pleasant) and Liverpool School of Music (in Bedford Street) are also shown (as is, coincidentally, Richard Francis Lloyd).[11]

A 1900 advertisement for Liverpool College of Music.

By 1901 Phipps was advertising the Conservatoire as having 'forty professors' and multiple establishments in London and Manchester as well as Liverpool.[12] The Conservatoire appeared to offer examinations throughout the country.[13] By 1907 he was also advertising a National Society of Musicians.[14]

However, by October 1910 the College was already bemoaning a lack of suitable premises and scholarships,[15] leading promising students to go elsewhere,[16] and eventually it closed in January 1911 due to lack of funds.[17][18]

A 1920 advert showing the continued use of the name Liverpool College of Music

It is worth noting, however, that Phipps continued to use the name for many years afterwards: an October 1912 advertisement for the National Conservatoire of Music, Ltd lists (alongside a London Office at 149 Oxford Street) branches at "Liverpool College of Music, 44 Princes Rd; & Manchester".[19] As late as 1920, this National Conservatoire of Music (now "under the direction of National Conservatoire Corporation Ltd") was still listing its "Educational Dept" as being "also at Liverpool College of Music, 62 Princes Rd".[20]

Staff and alumni[edit]

Names associated with the College include some that are internationally renowned, while others are better known on a local level or within specific genres:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "OPENING OF THE MEYERBEER HALL". The Musical World. Liverpool (4 January 1868). 2 January 1868. Retrieved 20 August 2020. On the last night of the old year the Meyerbeer Hall, Hardman Street, Liverpool, was formally opened [...] to meet the want of a private concert and ball-room [...] for the relief of the Jewish poor in Liverpool [...] 'This temple to MEYERBEER, the King of Song, we rear'.
  2. ^ "Our History". Liverpool - Spiritualists' National Union. 21 October 2018. Retrieved 20 August 2020.
  3. ^ Sexton, George (1876). The Spiritual Magazine. F. Pitman. pp. 276, 329. Retrieved 20 August 2020.
  4. ^ a b "Music in Liverpool and District". The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular. 33 (588): 93. 1 February 1892. ISSN 0958-8434. JSTOR 3364174. Retrieved 23 August 2020. The new Music School, Liverpool (limited), promises to be one of the most important establishments of the kind outside of London, and the promoters appear to have given its every detail the most careful consideration. This, indeed, is fully in evidence, judging by the completeness of the prospectus, though the thing itself has come as a surprise upon the public. The directors are Dr W.J. Hunt (Chairman for 1892) and Messrs. W.I. Argent, Carl Courvoisier, Carl Heinecke, and John Ross; among the professors being Merrs. Steudner Welsing, H.A. Branscombe, John Henry, William Streather, Carl Fuchs, and many other well-known musicians. The course of instruction is compendious, the fees moderate, and the premises leased are extremely commodious. Among the properties secured there is a two-manual organ, by Gray and Davison, and a concert grand pianoforte, kindly sent down by Steinway and Sons. Other instruments have also been secured, and the Institution (sic) opened on the 21st ult. with every prospect of success.
  5. ^ "Music in Liverpool and District". The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular. 43 (718): 822–823. 1 December 1902. ISSN 0958-8434. JSTOR 3369520. Retrieved 23 August 2020. The Commemoration Concert of the College of Music took place on the 10th ult. The College has now been in existence for ten years, and during that time it has done much useful work. Mr Carl Courvoisier conducted the orchestra of past and present students.
  6. ^ "Music in Liverpool". The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular. 37 (640): 403. 1 June 1896. ISSN 0958-8434. JSTOR 3368065. Retrieved 23 August 2020. On the 16th ult. [...] at the annual presentation of awards in connection with the Liverpool Music School [...] Mr Courvoisier, chairman for the year, announced that some time previously the title, "Liverpool College of Music" had been registered by his co-directors, and that under this more dignified style the Institution would in future carry on its work.
  7. ^ Chun, Dongho. "Collecting collectors: The Liverpool Art Club and its exhibitions 1872-1895" (PDF). Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  8. ^ "Music in Liverpool". The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular. 37 (644): 679–680. 1 October 1896. ISSN 0958-8434. JSTOR 3368989. Retrieved 23 August 2020. The Schiever Quartet is to [...] return to its original quarters at what was formerly the Art Club, but which is now tenanted by the Liverpool College of Music.
  9. ^ Benas, Bertram B. (16 April 1942). MERSEYSIDE ORCHESTRAS: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF LOCAL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC (PDF). p. 96. Retrieved 23 August 2020. William Ignatius Argent was [...] one of the founders of the old Liverpool College of Music (for a time situate [sic] in Hardman Street in the old Meyerbeer Hall, later in Upper Parliament Street and subsequently in Canning Street until its close)
  10. ^ a b c "Death of Mr W. I. Argent". Rhyl Journal. 23 May 1908. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Mr W I Argent, the well-known professor of music [...] a teacher at the Liverpool College of Music, Canning-street [...] Since 1890 Mr Argent had devoted special attention to the Liverpool College of Music, of which he was one of the founders and directors. Mr Carl Courvoisier, another of the founders, died last January.
  11. ^ "Gore's Directory of Liverpool & Birkenhead, 1900. [Part 3: Trade & Official Directories]". specialcollections.le.ac.uk. p. 290. Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  12. ^ "Front Matter". The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular. 42 (698): 221. 1 April 1901. ISSN 0958-8434. JSTOR 3366569. Retrieved 23 August 2020. National Conservatoire of Music, Ltd. Established 1895, incorporated 1900. Central office 22 Berners Street, London W. Warden: Professor Alexander Phipps. Prizes (Diplomas of Associate, Licentiate, Fellow). Examiners: Signor Tito Mattei, Herr Jacques Haakman, Herr Steudner-Welsing and Professor Alexander Phipps. Educational Departments, 21 Berners Street and Victoria Hall, London; The Conservatoire of Music, Hardman Street, Liverpool, and Victoria Hall, Withington, Manchester. Staff of forty Professors. Representatives wanted.
  13. ^ "The Rhondda Leader". newspapers.library.wales. 16 May 1903. p. 4. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Est. 1895, inc. 1900. Exams, all towns & districts of South Wales. Registrar: 174 Wardour Street or 5 Hardman Street. Examiners: Professor Alexander Phipps, C. Chambers, H.F. Henniker, Jacques Haakman
  14. ^ "Front Matter". The Musical Times. 48 (767): i–8. 1 January 1907. ISSN 0027-4666. JSTOR 903802. Retrieved 23 August 2020. National Conservatoire of Music, Ltd (inst. 1895, incor. 1900) - London, 174 Wardour Street, Liverpool, 5 Hardman Street. Warden: Professor Alexander Phipps. Examinations (Diplomas, Associate, Licentiate, Fellow). National Society of Musicians [...] (same addresses, with Phipps as Hon. Sec.)
  15. ^ "Music in the Provinces". The Musical Times. 51 (813): 737. 1 November 1910. ISSN 0027-4666. JSTOR 906202. Retrieved 23 August 2020. At the annual distribution of awards to students of the Liverpool College of Music, Mr J.G. Legge, City Director of Education, presided. In commending the work done by the College, of which the annual report was read by Mr H.E. Hunt, the chairman hoped that the time was not far distant when this deserving institution would be provided with suitable buildings and scholarships.
  16. ^ "Music in the Provinces". The Musical Times. 51 (814): 801. 1 December 1910. ISSN 0027-4666. JSTOR 906053. Retrieved 23 August 2020. At the recent distribution of awards at the Liverpool College of Music, of which Dr F.H. Cowen is hon. president, the annual report was read by Mr H.E. Hunt. In commenting on its favourable features and on the excellent work done by the College students, Mr J.G. Legge, the City Director of Education, emphasized the desirability of a more suitable building and the provision of scholarships. It is hoped that public interest will be aroused by Mr Legge's timely speech. It is rather a reflection on this great centre that clever students of the College have to go elsewhere to take up scholarships worth having.
  17. ^ "Music in the Provinces". The Musical Times. 52 (816): 120. 1 February 1911. ISSN 0027-4666. JSTOR 906678. Retrieved 23 August 2020. The passing of the Liverpool College of Music is noted with regret. Founded in 1891 as a non-dividend-paying company, its affiliation with the University of Liverpool was mooted, but the project fell through. Subsequently municipal control was advocated, having regard to the eighteen free Corporation studentships tenable at the College, but though the principle was conceded as regards these scholarships, further aid was not forthcoming, and recently an attempt to secure public support by subscriptions failed. It was found that the income from fees was insufficient to meet the expenses, and the yearly deficiency had to be met by the non-payment of fees payable as teachers to the trio of managing directors, Messrs. Carl Heinècke, H. Ernest Hunt and Alfred Ross. At a recent shareholders' meeting called to consider the financial position, voluntary liquidation was decided upon.
  18. ^ "Music in the Provinces". The Musical Times. 52 (817): 192–193. 1 March 1911. ISSN 0027-4666. JSTOR 906410. The City Education Committee have sanctioned the appointment and payment of teachers for eighteen musical exhibitions, the arrangement having become necessary because the Liverpool College of Music, at which the scholarships were tenable, has ceased to be a teaching institution.
  19. ^ "Front Matter". The Musical Times. 53 (836): 630. 1 October 1912. ISSN 0027-4666. JSTOR 906768. Retrieved 23 August 2020. National Conservatoire of Music, Ltd. Inst. 1895, incor. 1900. London Office and Educational Department, 149, Oxford Street. Council: Professor Alexander Phipps, Warden; Dr W.H. Paltridge; Dr F.W. Haydock. [...] Branches: Liverpool College of Music, 44 Princes Rd; & Manchester.
  20. ^ "Front Matter". The Musical Times. 61 (932): 649–658. 1 October 1920. ISSN 0027-4666. JSTOR 908131. Retrieved 23 August 2020. National Conservatoire of Music. Under direction of National Conservatoire Corporation (Ltd). 149 Oxford Street, London W1. Council: Professor Alexander Phipps, Warden; Dr W.H. Paltridge; Dr F.W. Haydock; Walter Williams. [...] Educational Dept also at Liverpool College of Music, 62 Princes Rd.
  21. ^ Lucas, John (2008). Thomas Beecham: An Obsession with Music. Boydell & Brewer Ltd. p. 12. ISBN 978-1-84383-402-1. Retrieved 23 August 2020. [Beecham] took lessons in harmony and composition from a young teacher at the Liverpool College of Music, Frederic Austin.
  22. ^ a b "Introduction to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography" (PDF). Oxford DNB. Oxford University Press. November 2019. Retrieved 23 August 2020. The indefatigable Frederic Austin [...] taught singing and composition at the Liverpool College of Music (where a young Thomas Beecham was among his first pupils)
  23. ^ a b Haider, Claudia. "Biography of Geoffrey Gilbert (1914-1989)". www.flutepage.de. Retrieved 23 August 2020. 1928: Scholarship for studying with Albert Cunnington (Liverpool College of Music)
  24. ^ a b Taylor, Stainton de Boufflers (1976). Two Centuries of Music in Liverpool: A Scrap-book of Information Concerning Musical Activities Both Professional and Amateur. Rockliff Brothers Limited. pp. 70, 108, 111. ISBN 9780950514307. Retrieved 23 August 2020. as a youngster, Eugene Aynsley Goossens studied violin with Charles Ross at the Liverpool College of Music
  25. ^ "News of Former Pupils". St Edward's College Magazine. 5 (4): 7. 1987–1988. Retrieved 23 August 2020. In 1905 weekly lessons at the Liverpool College of Music inspired the young Leon to take up the oboe with such effect that he played in the Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra under Beecham at the age of twelve!
  26. ^ "A THIRD GARLAND OF BRITISH LIGHT MUSIC COMPOSERS". Musicweb International. Retrieved 20 August 2020. [Austin] joined the staff of Liverpool College of Music where he remained teaching Harmony, until 1906
  27. ^ a b "Music in Liverpool and District". The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular. 43 (717): 752. 1 November 1902. ISSN 0958-8434. JSTOR 3369563. Retrieved 23 August 2020. a concert of particular interest was given at the College of Music by Messrs. Carl Courvoisier and Fred. C. Nicholls, when the programme was devoted in its entirety to their compositions. The concert-givers were assisted by Misses Isabel, Helena and Mary McCullagh, Miss Mary Hillhouse, Mr Frederick [sic] Austin, and Mr Frank Bertrand.
  28. ^ "Louis Cohen". The Musical Times. 98 (1367): 40. January 1957. ISSN 0027-4666. JSTOR 938389. Louis Cohen, conductor [...] studied at the old Liverpool College of Music
  29. ^ "Front Matter". The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular. 28 (537): 643. 1 Nov 1887. ISSN 0958-8434. JSTOR 3360234. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Very highly recommended by Mr. W. H. Jude, Principal of the Liverpool College of Music.
  30. ^ Thornsby, Frederick W. (1912). Dictionary of organs and organists. Bournemouth: H. Logan & company. pp. 317–318. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Principal Liverpool College of Music and Liverpool Conservatoire of Music since 1884.
  31. ^ Benas, Bertram B. (16 April 1942). MERSEYSIDE ORCHESTRAS : AN INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF LOCAL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC (PDF). p. 96. Retrieved 23 August 2020. William Ignatius Argent was [...] one of the founders of the old Liverpool College of Music (for a time situate [sic] in Hardman Street in the old Meyerbeer Hall, later in Upper Parliament Street and subsequently in Canning Street until its close)
  32. ^ "Music in Liverpool". The Musical Times. 49 (781): 186. 1 March 1908. ISSN 0027-4666. JSTOR 904838. The death of Mr Carl Courvoisier is recorded with regret. Well known as a violinist and teacher [...] he had considerable experience as conductor [...] the Schiever Quartet, in which [he] played the viola
  33. ^ a b "DEATH OF A MUSICIAN". newspapers.library.wales. The North Wales Chronicle and Advertiser for the Principality. 13 August 1915. p. 3. Retrieved 23 August 2020. The death of Mr Frank Shea, musical director of the Shakespeare Theatre, Liverpool, occurred at Penmaenmawr [...] He received his musical training at the Liverpool College of Music under the late Mr Carl Courvoisier.
  34. ^ a b "Liverpool Mercury". Newspapers.com. 24 March 1897. p. 6. Retrieved 23 August 2020. A leading pianist in Liverpool, an accomplished professor of music, and an extremely popular man, is Mr H. Steudner-Welsing, who has just been appointed chairman of the Liverpool College of Music, in succession to Mr Carl Courvoisier.
  35. ^ "Music in Liverpool and District". The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular. 41 (693): 752. 1 November 1900. ISSN 0958-8434. JSTOR 3366928. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Isidor Cohn, who has joined the staff of the Liverpool College of Music in succession to Mr Steudner Welsing [...] is a distinct acquisition to the professorial staff of what is, locally, the most important teaching institution for music in this city.
  36. ^ Julie Needham Wright. "Julie's TTT. An original flute method". Zamzam Music. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Vincent Needham Sr [...] was principal flute with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic and The Hallé 1900-16 and teacher at the Manchester College of Music and Liverpool College of Music. Vincent Needham Jr. became Geoffrey Gilbert’s first flute teacher.
  37. ^ Watt, Paul (2009). "A 'Gigantic and Popular Place of Entertainment': Granville Bantock and Music-Making at the New Brighton Tower in the Late 1890s". Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle. 42: 109–164. doi:10.1080/14723808.2009.10541027. S2CID 161906384. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Taylor mentions that one Charles Ross, a student at the Liverpool College of Music, undertook further studies at the Brussells Conservatoire. This is a tenuous, but possible, link suggesting some sort of relationship between both institutions.
  38. ^ "Obituary: John Ross". The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular. 38 (658): 843. 1 December 1897. ISSN 0958-8434. JSTOR 3367244. Retrieved 23 August 2020. John Ross, one of the most respected members of the musical profession [...] was one of the founders, and for some time a director, of the Liverpool College of Music.
  39. ^ St Catherine's School Magazine. July 1900. p. 2. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Ella Leyland has passed an Examination (Advanced Grade Pianoforte, and Professional in Harmony) with honours at the Liverpool College of Music, being only two marks below the Scholarship in Harmony.
  40. ^ "Richard Francis Lloyd". www.hymntime.com. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Lloyd taught at the Liverpool College of Music (1894–1900) [and] became principal of the Liverpool Academy of Music in 1901
  41. ^ Evans, Robert; Humphreys, Maggie (1 Jan 1997). Dictionary of Composers for the Church in Great Britain and Ireland. Bloomsbury Publishing. p. 211. ISBN 978-1-4411-3796-8. Retrieved 23 August 2020. A professor of the Liverpool College of Music (1894-1900)
  42. ^ Thornsby, Frederick W. (1912). Dictionary of organs and organists. Bournemouth: H. Logan & company. pp. 317–318. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Educated [...] Liverpool College of Music. Member Royal College of Organists.
  43. ^ Tobin, J. Raymond (1965). Music Box ... 1001 questions and answers on music. Retrieved 23 August 2020. [Tobin] was educated at the Liverpool College of Music. He is editor of The Music Teacher [and] Chairman of the Music Teachers’ Association
  44. ^ "Teacher Registrations". Liverpool Schools. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Member of the Incorporated Society of Musicians, Liverpool College of Music 1891-1911)
  45. ^ "Music in Liverpool and District". The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular. 40 (672): 115–116. 1 February 1899. ISSN 0958-8434. JSTOR 3366004. Retrieved 23 August 2020. The Schiever Quartet [...] were joined by Maggie Bennett [...] formerly a student at the Liverpool College of Music, where the performance took place. In the same hall, on the 26th ult., a number of local Corporation Exhibitioners gave evidence of the good work done by Mr Courvoisier at the same Institution, where Mr Welsing is also giving a series of Bach recitals.
  46. ^ Green, Michael (20 December 2014). "Chart-topping band T'Pau to return to The Live Rooms in Chester". CheshireLive. Retrieved 23 August 2020. Her father was an accomplished pianist who had studied at Liverpool’s College of Music.