Lloyd C.I

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Lloyd C.I
Einlaufen des Motors einer Flugmanschine. Standort, Flugplatz Villach. Aufgen.4.September 1915. (BildID 15461714).jpg
Role Reconnaissance aircraft
National origin Austria-Hungary
Manufacturer Lloyd
First flight 1913
Primary user KuKLFT
Number built 13

The Lloyd C.I was a reconnaissance aircraft produced in Austria-Hungary shortly before and during the First World War, and which formed the basis for a number of other closely related types.[1] It was the Lloyd company's own design,[2] but reflected the DFW designs that Lloyd had previously been building under licence, in particular, in its swept-back, "Pfeil" ("arrow")-style wings.[3] Apart from this feature, it was a conventional biplane design for its day, with staggered wings of unequal span and accommodation for the pilot and observer in tandem, open cockpits. The fuselage was built from welded steel tube, and was covered in fabric.[3] A small load of bombs could be carried internally, to be released by the observer.[3]

The type was demonstrated at the 1914 Vienna air meet, piloted by Lloyd founder Oblt Heinrich Bier.[1] On the first day of flying (21 June), he used it to set two altitude records, one for a pilot and single passenger (6,170 m or 20,237 ft) and one for pilot and two passengers (5,440 m or 17,843 ft),[4] also winning the altitude competition for the meet.[5]

Operators[edit]

 Austria-Hungary

Specifications[edit]

Data from Grosz 2002, German & Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908–1918[6]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 8.9 m (29 ft 2 in)
  • Upper wingspan: 14.4 m (47 ft 3 in)
  • Lower wingspan: 13.6 m (44 ft 7 in)
  • Height: 3.15 m (10 ft 4 in)
  • Wing area: 44 m2 (470 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 843 kg (1,858 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,329 kg (2,930 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Hiero 145hp 6-cyl. water-cooled in-line piston engine, 108 kW (145 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 128 km/h (80 mph, 69 kn)
  • Service ceiling: 6,174 m (20,256 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 2.8 m/s (550 ft/min)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Taylor 1989, 581
  2. ^ Gunston 1993, 184
  3. ^ a b c "The Hungarian Lloyd Biplane", 334
  4. ^ "Foreign Aircraft News", 742
  5. ^ "The Vienna Flying Meeting", 743
  6. ^ Treadwell, Terry C. (2010). German & Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908–1918. Stroud: Amberley Publishing. pp. 268–271. ISBN 978 1 4456 0102 1.

Further reading[edit]