Loss Pequeño Glazier

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Loss Pequeño Glazier is a poet, professor of Media Study, SUNY Buffalo, New York, Director, Electronic Poetry Center (EPC), Director, E-Poetry Festivals, and Artistic Director, Digital Poetry & Dance (UB).

Glazier stands among literary figures at the "forefront of the digital poetics movement".[1] He is author of the first book-length study of digital poetry,[2] Digital Poetics: the Making of E-Poetries (Alabama, 2002),[3] as well as Anatman, Pumpkin Seed, Algorithm (Salt, 2003), and Small Press (Greenwood, 1992),[4] the major digital works, white faced bromeliads on 20 hectares (1999, 2012),[5][6] Io Sono at Swoons (2002),[7] and Territorio Libre (2003-2010),[8] as well as poems, essays, film, visual art, sound, digital works, and projects for dance, music, installations, and performance. These three digital works are featured in his digital poetry performance film, Middle Orange | Media Naranja (Buffalo, 2010). Glazier's poetic vision was also the subject of an interview by David (Jhave) Johnston in 2012.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Bruehl, Thalia A-M, "Technology's Poet". (Hispanic Executive, July/August 2011): 28-29"
  2. ^ Adalaide Morris, "New Media Poetics: As We May Think/How to Write" in Morris, Adalaide and Thomas Swiss, eds. New Media Poetics: Contexts, Technotexts & Theories. MIT Press, 2006: 21"
  3. ^ "How Do They Do It?" Publishers Weekly 9 July 2001: 65. Literature Resource Center. Web. 17 Aug. 2012.
  4. ^ "Small Press: An Annotated Guide" Library Quarterly Oct 1993: 564-565.
  5. ^ Ingalls, Zoe, "A Web Site Grows New Poems, Sometimes Right Before Readers' Eyes." (The Chronicle of Higher Education, July 28, 2000)
  6. ^ Tessier, Natalie Green, "At UB, 'E-Poetry' Plays With Rhyme, Reason" Buffalo News 17 April 2001: C1.
  7. ^ See: "Artist's Statement" in Morris, Adalaide and Thomas Swiss, eds. New Media Poetics: Contexts, Technotexts & Theories. MIT Press, 2006"
  8. ^ Venegas, Cristina, "Shared Dreams and Red Cockroaches: Cuba and Digital Culture". (Hispanic Review, December 2007): 399-414"

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