Loudoun MacLean

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Loudoun James MacLean
Born (1893-02-01)1 February 1893
Ealing, London, England
Died Unknown
Allegiance United Kingdom
Service/branch British Army
Royal Air Force
Royal Navy
Years of service 1914–1935
1939–?
Rank Squadron Leader
Unit Royal Engineers
No. 41 Squadron RFC
Battles/wars World War I
 • Western Front
World War II
Awards Military Cross & Bar

Squadron Leader Loudoun James MacLean MC* (born 1 February 1893) was a British World War I flying ace credited with five aerial victories.[1]

Biography[edit]

Family background[edit]

MacLean was born in Ealing, London,[1] the son of Loudoun Francis MacLean[2] CIE (1848–1897), who died in Delhi, India, while serving as superintending engineer of the Jumna Canal.[3]

World War I[edit]

After training as a "Gentlemen Cadet" at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, MacLean was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Corps of Royal Engineers on 1 April 1914.[4][5] He was promoted to lieutenant on 9 June 1915,[6] and served on the Western Front in France, winning the Military Cross, which was gazetted on 2 October. His citation read:

Lieutenant Loudoun James MacLean, 57th Field Company, Royal Engineers.
"For conspicuous gallantry and determination during the nights of 25th to 31st August 1915, when he skilfully erected a bridge over the Yser Canal near Boesinghe under heavy rifle fire. Although he lost several of his men, he carried the work through satisfactorily."[7]

MacLean was seconded to the Royal Flying Corps, and after completing flying training, was appointed a flying officer on 5 May 1917.[8] In June he was posted to No. 41 Squadron RFC,[9] which was the last RFC squadron flying the obsolete F.E.8 fighter. These were replaced with the Airco DH.5 in July, but these also proved unsatisfactory, and in October they were replaced by the S.E.5a single-seat fighter. MacLean was appointed a flight commander with the temporary rank of captain on 24 October,[10] and promoted to captain in the Royal Engineers on 3 November.[11] He gained his first aerial victory on 29 November, when he and Lieutenants Russell Winnicott, D. V. D. MacGregor, and Essell, shared in the driving down out of control of an Albatros D.V over Douai. The following day, 30 November, MacLean shared in the destruction of two more enemy aircraft; an Albatros D.V over Inchy-en-Artois with Lieutenant D. V. D MacGregor, and a Type C reconnaissance aircraft over Rumilly with Captain Meredith Thomas, and Lieutenants Russell Winnicott and Frank H. Taylor. On 9 January 1918 he shared in the driving down of a Rumpler C east of Marcoing with Second Lieutenants A. T. Isbell and Alfred Hemming, and on 3 February another Type C driven down north-west of Douai shared with Second Lieutenant G. A. Lippsett.[1]

MacLean was awarded a bar to his Military Cross on 6 February 1918,[12] which was gazetted on 2 July. His citation read:

Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Loudoun James MacLean, MC, Royal Engineers and Royal Flying Corps.
"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While leading a patrol he attacked and drove down an enemy two-seater machine and destroyed an enemy scout. He showed the greatest determination in leading patrols and splendid coolness and courage, most of his work being done under very difficult weather conditions."[13]

Post-war career[edit]

MacLean stayed in the RAF post-war, being granted a permanent commission with the rank of captain on 1 August 1919,[14] and resigned his commission in the Royal Engineers the same day.[15]

He served in Iraq, in the Central Air Communication Section, before being transferred to the headquarters of RAF Iraq Command on 1 April 1922,[16] finally returning to England when posted to the RAF Depot (Inland Area) as a supernumerary on 24 January 1923.[17] From there he was posted to the Superintendent of Reserves, based at RAF Northolt on 24 August,[18] then to the RAF Cadet College at RAF Cranwell on 24 October.[19] On 15 September 1924 MacLean was posted to the Inland Area Aircraft Depot, RAF Henlow.[20]

On 1 January 1927 MacLean was promoted from flight lieutenant to squadron leader.[21] He was posted to the RAF Depot at RAF Uxbridge on 15 July 1929,[22] then to the No. 1 School of Technical Training, for engineer duties in No. 1 (Apprentices) Wing, at RAF Halton on 10 November.[23] He left Halton on 2 March 1934,[24] and on the 14th was posted to the Home Aircraft Depot at RAF Henlow,[25] serving there until 3 September.[26] He then served on the Central Trade Test Board at the Reception Depot at RAF West Drayton until 16 March 1935.[27] Finally, on 1 April 1935 Maclean was placed on the retired list on account of his ill-health.[28]

However he returned to service during the Second World War, being commissioned as a temporary lieutenant-commander (A) in the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm on 31 August 1939.[29]

References[edit]

Citations
  1. ^ a b c "Loudoun James MacLean". The Aerodrome. 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  2. ^ "Personals: To be Married". Flight. XIX (952): 179. 24 March 1927. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  3. ^ "Deaths" (PDF). The Engineer: 627. 24 December 1897. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  4. ^ "No. 28818". The London Gazette. 3 April 1914. p. 2880. 
  5. ^ "No. 28822". The London Gazette. 17 April 1914. p. 3232. 
  6. ^ "No. 29208". The London Gazette (Supplement). 25 June 1915. p. 6241. 
  7. ^ "No. 12859". The Edinburgh Gazette. 5 October 1915. p. 1512. 
  8. ^ "No. 30097". The London Gazette (Supplement). 25 May 1917. p. 5209. 
  9. ^ Brew, Steve (2014). "The Pilots of 41 Squadron RAF 1916-1919". brew.clients.ch. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  10. ^ "No. 30375". The London Gazette (Supplement). 9 November 1917. p. 11638. 
  11. ^ "No. 30362". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 October 1917. p. 11302. 
  12. ^ "No. 13205". The Edinburgh Gazette. 6 February 1918. p. 573. 
  13. ^ "No. 30780". The London Gazette (Supplement). 2 July 1918. p. 7893. 
  14. ^ "No. 31486". The London Gazette. 1 August 1919. p. 9867. 
  15. ^ "No. 32051". The London Gazette (Supplement). 14 September 1920. p. 9274. 
  16. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XIV (706): 389. 6 July 1922. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  17. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XV (742): 151. 15 March 1923. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  18. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XV (764): 499. 16 August 1923. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  19. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XV (774): 663. 25 October 1923. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  20. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XVI (819): 557. 4 September 1924. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  21. ^ "No. 14301". The Edinburgh Gazette. 4 January 1927. p. 9. 
  22. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XXI (1075): 839. 1 August 1929. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  23. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XXI (1095): 1337. 20 December 1929. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  24. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XXVI (1316): 265. 15 March 1934. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  25. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XXVI (1319): 343. 5 April 1934. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  26. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XXVI (1344): 1010. 27 September 1934. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  27. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XXVII (1371): 366. 4 April 1935. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  28. ^ "Royal Air Force: Appointments". Flight. XXVII (1372): 392. 11 April 1935. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  29. ^ "No. 34718". The London Gazette (Supplement). 27 October 1939. p. 7179. 
Bibliography
  • Shores, Christopher F.; Franks, Norman & Guest, Russell F. (1990). Above the Trenches: a Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Air Forces 1915–1920. London, UK: Grub Street. ISBN 978-0-948817-19-9.