Lynch Cooper

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Lynch Cooper
Born1903 (1903)
Moira Lake near Tocumwal, New South Wales
Died30 July 1971(1971-07-30) (aged 67–68)
Wangaratta, Victoria
Resting placeWangarattta Cemetery[1]
Spouse(s)Eva Christian (1910-1988)
Parent(s)William Cooper and Agnes nee Hamilton
RelativesDouglas Nicholls (cousin)
1930 Lynch Cooper and his challengers as world professional sprinter

Lynch Cooper (~1903–1971) was an Aboriginal Australian sprinter who won the Stawell Gift in 1928 and the world's professional sprint championship competition in 1929.[2][3]

He later become prominent in Aboriginal activism including as President of the Aboriginal Progressive Association in the 1940s.[4][5]

Family[edit]

Cooper was born at Moira Lake near Tocumwal and was educated at Mulwala State School.[6] His father was Aboriginal activist and community leader William Cooper.

Lynch Cooper married Eva Christian, daughter of Alfred William Christian and Annie Laid née Bruce, of Jeparit on 11 February 1939 at the Methodist Church, Footscray, Victoria.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://billiongraves.com/grave/person/11712453
  2. ^ "THE STAWELL "GIFT"". The Referee (2142). Sydney. 11 April 1928. p. 15. Retrieved 11 August 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ "WORLD'S SPRINT CHAMPION". Weekly Times (3205). Victoria, Australia. 2 March 1929. p. 66. Retrieved 11 August 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ "All Aboriginal Deputation For Canberra". Shepparton Advertiser. 66 (30). Victoria, Australia. 26 April 1949. p. 1. Retrieved 11 August 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ "Editor's Mail Bag". Shepparton Advertiser. 61 (13). Victoria, Australia. 15 February 1946. p. 4. Retrieved 11 August 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "Sprint Champion". Sporting Globe. , (767). Victoria, Australia. 30 November 1929. p. 6 (FIRSTEDITION). Retrieved 11 August 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  7. ^ "No title". The Argus (Melbourne) (28, 854). Victoria, Australia. 13 February 1939. p. 6. Retrieved 11 September 2017 – via National Library of Australia.