Malcolm McIntosh

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Sir Malcolm McIntosh
AC
Secretary of the Department of Industry, Technology and Commerce
In office
1 July 1990 – 22 December 1990
Secretary of the Department of Defence, United Kingdom
In office
January 1991 – January 1996
Chief Executive of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
In office
5 February 1996 – 7 February 2000
Personal details
Born Malcolm Kenneth McIntosh
(1945-12-14)14 December 1945
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Died 7 February 2000(2000-02-07) (aged 54)
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Nationality Australia Australian
Spouse(s) Margaret McIntosh
Children Stuart McIntosh, James McIntosh, Lucy McIntosh, Charles McIntosh
Parents Kenneth McIntosh, Valerie McIntosh
Alma mater Australian National University
Occupation Public servant

Sir Malcolm Kenneth McIntosh AC was an Australian scientist and senior public servant.

Life and career[edit]

Malcolm McIntosh was born in Melbourne on 14 December 1945.[1][2] He was schooled at Telopea Park School,[1] going on to study physics at both undergraduate and doctorate level at the Australian National University.[2][3]

In 1990, McIntosh was appointed Secretary of the Department of Industry, Technology and Commerce.[4]

In 1991, Malcolm was recruited by the British Department of Defence to their most senior position of Chief of Defence Procurement. He received a Knighthood at the end of this term in January 1996, for public service. he also received the top American Public Service Medal for his work during this period.

Between 1996 and 2000, McIntosh was the head of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO).[5]

McIntosh died in Melbourne on 7 February 2000,[1] after acquiring an infection whilst suffering from cancer.[6]

Awards[edit]

McIntosh was appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia in January 1999 for service to excellence in scientific and technological research, to providing new opportunities for industries, and to Australian Defence industry and science policy.[7] He had already been awarded a British knighthood and a US Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service.[8][9]

Malcolm McIntosh's work is now commemorated in the Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year.[2] His life and legacy is honoured every year at the annual Malcolm McIntosh Lecture.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Burgess, Verona (9 February 2000). "Scientist a Courageous and Brilliant Leader". The Canberra Times. Fairfax Media. p. 11. 
  2. ^ a b c Sir Malcolm Kenneth McIntosh [1945-2000], CSIRO, archived from the original on 14 August 2013 
  3. ^ Grose, Simon (28 August 1995). "CSIRO's man for the next season". The Canberra Times. p. 44. 
  4. ^ Hawke, Robert (30 May 1990). "Unknown" (Press release). Archived from the original on 13 April 2014. 
  5. ^ Rigby, Rebecca, Biographical entry: McIntosh, Sir Malcolm Kenneth (1945 - 2000), Encyclopedia of Australian Science, archived from the original on 31 March 2014 
  6. ^ Smith, Deborah (9 February 2000). "Indomitable scientist fought adversity and left a lasting national legacy: Obituary". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. 
  7. ^ Search Australian Honours: MCINTOSH, Malcolm Kenneth, Australian Government, archived from the original on 13 April 2014 
  8. ^ "No. 54255". The London Gazette (Supplement). 29 December 1995. p. 2. 
  9. ^ Minchin, Nick (15 February 2000), "McIntosh, Dr Malcolm Kenneth AC Kt", Senate Hansard, Parliament of Australia, archived from the original on 28 January 2015 
  10. ^ Malcolm McIntosh Lecture, CSIRO, 22 March 2013, archived from the original on 11 October 2013 
Government offices
Preceded by
David Charles
Secretary of the Department of Industry, Technology and Commerce
1990
Succeeded by
Neville Stevens
Preceded by
Roy Montague Green
Chief Executive of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
1996 – 2000
Succeeded by
Colin Adam