Manitoba general election, 1969

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Manitoba general election, 1969

← 1966 June 25, 1969 1973 →

57 seats of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba
29 seats were needed for a majority

  First party Second party Third party
  Edward Schreyer (crop).jpg PC LIB
Leader Edward Schreyer Walter Weir Robert Bend
Party New Democratic Progressive Conservative Liberal
Leader since June 7, 1969 November 25, 1967 May 10, 1969
Leader's seat Rossmere Minnedosa Ran in Lakeside (lost)
Last election 11 31 14
Seats won 28 22 5
Seat change Increase17 Decrease9 Decrease9
Popular vote 128,080 119,021 80,288
Percentage 38.27% 35.56% 23.99%
Swing Increase15.13pp Decrease4.40pp Decrease9.14pp

  Fourth party
  SC
Leader Jacob Froese
Party Social Credit
Leader's seat Rhineland
Last election 1
Seats won 1
Seat change Steady0
Popular vote 4,535
Percentage 1.36%
Swing Decrease2.18pp

MB1969.PNG
Map of Election Results

Premier before election

Walter Weir
Progressive Conservative

Premier-designate

Edward Schreyer
New Democratic

The Manitoba General Election of June 25, 1969 was held to elect Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) of the Canadian province of Manitoba. It was a watershed moment in the province's political history. The social-democratic New Democratic Party emerged for the first time as the largest party in the legislature, winning 28 out of 57 seats. The governing Progressive Conservative Party fell to 22, and the once-dominant Liberal Party fell to an historical low of five. The Social Credit Party won one seat, and there was also one Independent elected.

It was not clear what form the government would take in the days immediately following the election. There were negotiations among the Liberal and Progressive Conservatives to form a minority coalition government, supported by the Social Credit and Independent members; under this scenario, former Liberal leader Gildas Molgat would have become Premier. These plans came to nothing when Liberal MLA Laurent Desjardins announced that he would sit as a "Liberal Democrat" supporting the NDP, allowing the NDP to form government by one seat. Edward Schreyer became the province's first social democratic Premier shortly thereafter.

The Manitoba NDP had a total election budget of $45,000. Although very small by modern standards, this was the most the party had ever spent up to this time.[1]

Results[edit]

Party Party Leader # of
candidates
Seats Popular Vote
1966 Elected % Change # % Change
  New Democratic Edward Schreyer 57 11 28 +154.5% 128,080 38.27% +15.13
  Progressive Conservative Walter Weir 57 31 22 -29.0% 119,021 35.56% -4.40
  Liberal Robert Bend 57 14 5 -64.3% 80,288 23.99% -9.14
Social Credit Jacob Froese (?) 6 1 1 - 4,535 1.36% -2.18
Communist William Cecil Ross 2 - - - 744 0.22% +0.02
  Independent 5 - 1   2,020 0.60% +0.57
Total 184 57 57 - 334,688 100%  


Preceded by
1966 Manitoba election
List of Manitoba elections Succeeded by
1973 Manitoba election

See also[edit]

Riding results[edit]

Party key:

(x) denotes incumbent.

Arthur:

Assiniboia:


Manitoba general election, 1969: Birtle-Russell
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
     Progressive Conservative Harry Graham 2,374 39.59
New Democratic Donald Kostesky 2,263 37.74
Liberal John Braendle 1,360 22.68
Total valid votes 5,997 100.00
Rejected and discarded votes 12
Turnout 6,009 72.47
Electors on the lists 8,292

Brandon East:

Brandon West:

Burrows:

Charleswood:

Churchill:

Crescentwood:

Dauphin:

Elmwood:

Emerson:

Flin Flon:

Fort Garry:

Fort Rouge:

Gimli:

Gladstone:

Inkster:

  • (x)Sidney Green (NDP) 4001
  • Robert Armstrong (PC) 989
  • Gurzon Harvey (L) 661

Kildonan:

Lac Du Bonnet:

Lakeside:


Manitoba general election, 1969: La Verendrye
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Leonard Barkman 1,933 52.17
     Progressive Conservative John Blatz 1,051 28.46
New Democratic Elmer Reimer 721 19.46
Total valid votes 3,705 100.00
Rejected and discarded votes 29
Turnout 3,734 50.64
Electors on the lists 7,369

Logan:

Minnedosa:


Manitoba general election, 1969: Morris
Party Candidate Votes %
     Progressive Conservative Warner Jorgenson 2,472 53.76
Liberal Joseph Legault 1,183 25.73
New Democratic William T. Loftus 712 15.48
Social Credit Henry Funk 231 5.02
Total valid votes 4,598 100.00
Rejected and discarded votes 15
Turnout 4,613 61.20
Electors on the lists 7,537

Osborne:

Pembina:


Manitoba general election, 1969: Point Douglas
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Donald Malinowski 2,253 52.52
     Progressive Conservative Slaw Rebchuk 1,088 25.36
Liberal Roger Garrity 528 12.31
Communist Bill Kardash 421 9.81
Total valid votes 4,290 100.00
Rejected and discarded votes 62
Turnout 4,352 46.37
Electors on the lists 9,385

Portage la Prairie:

Radisson:

Rhineland:

Riel:

River Heights:

Roblin:

Rock Lake:

Rossmere:

Rupertsland:

St. Boniface:

St. George:

St. James:

St. Johns:

St. Matthews:


Manitoba general election, 1969: St. Vital
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
     Progressive Conservative Jack Hardy 2,587 36.01
New Democratic Jim Walding 2,564 35.69
Liberal Joe Stangl 2,034 28.31
Total valid votes 7,185 100.00
Rejected votes 39
Turnout 7,224 68.04
Electors on the lists 10,617

Ste. Rose:

Selkirk:

Seven Oaks:

Souris-Killarney:

Springfield:

Sturgeon Creek:

Swan River:

The Pas:

Thompson:

Transcona:

Virden:

Wellington:

Winnipeg Centre:

Wolseley:

Post-election changes[edit]

Jack Hardy (St. Vital, PC) resigned his seat. A by-election was called for April 5, 1971.


Manitoba provincial by-election, April 5, 1971: St. Vital
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Jim Walding 3,378 35.94 +0.25
Liberal Dan Kennedy 3,083 32.80 +4.49
     Progressive Conservative Kenneth Pratt 2,925 31.12 −4.89
     Independent Sam Bordman 13 0.14
Total valid votes 9,399 100
Rejected and declined ballots 10
Turnout 9,409 83.05 +15.01
Electors on the lists 11,329

Ste. Rose (res. Gildas Molgat, October 7, 1970), April 5, 1971:

Minnedosa (res. Walter Weir, September 1971), November 16, 1971:

Laurent Desjardins formally joined the NDP in 1971.

Wolseley (dec. Leonard Claydon, 1971), June 16, 1972:

Jean Allard left the NDP to sit as an Independent on April 7, 1972. Joseph Borowski left the NDP caucus on June 25, 1972.

Churchill (dec. Gordon Beard, November 12, 1972)[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ian Stewart, Just One Vote: Jim Walding's nomination to constitutional defeat, (Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press), 2009, p. 17.
  2. ^ http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/people/beard_gw.shtml