Martin A. Siegel

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Martin A. Siegel (born 1948) is an American former investment banker who became embroiled in the insider trading scandals of the 1980s, alongside Ivan Boesky and Michael Milken.

Biography[edit]

Born to a Jewish family,[1] Siegel is a graduate of Harvard Business School.[2] In 1971, he joined Kidder, Peabody & Co. and during his 15 years at the firm became known as a takeover specialist.[3] In February 1986, he left Kidder to become a managing director at Drexel Burnham Lambert.[4]

On February 13, 1987, Siegel pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to violate the securities laws and one count of tax evasion.[5] His guilty plea included an agreement to pay over US$9 million in civil penalties and forfeit $10 million more in bonuses and stock owed to him by Drexel -- a sum many times greater than the illegal gains from his relationship with Boesky.[6][7] He eventually received a sentence of two months imprisonment and five years probation with 3,000 hours of community service. The sentence was light because of his cooperation with other government investigations.[8] His involvement in criminal activities is recounted in the book Den of Thieves by Pulitzer Prize winning author James B. Stewart.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fechter, Melvin (2013). Through the Eye of a Jew. 2. p. 37. ISBN 978-1-304-44057-0.
  2. ^ Wilkes, Paul (January 22, 1989). "The Tough Job Of Teaching Ethics". The New York Times. The New York Times Company.
  3. ^ Glaberson, William (February 22, 1987). "Kidder Faces Life After Siegel". The New York Times. The New York Times Company.
  4. ^ "Executives". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. February 11, 1986.
  5. ^ Cole, Robert J. (February 14, 1987). "A Former Client Recalls Siegel's Work in Mergers". The New York Times. The New York Times Company.
  6. ^ Glaberson, William (February 14, 1987). "Wall St Informer Admits His Guilt in Insider Trading". The New York Times. The New York Times Company.
  7. ^ Katz, Ian (October 25, 1993). "PAYBACK TIME FOR MARTY SIEGEL". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286.
  8. ^ Eichenwald, Kurt (June 16, 1990). "Key Inside Trader Gets 2 Months". The New York Times. The New York Times Company.

External links[edit]