Martin Augustine Knapp

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Martin Knapp
Portrait of Martin Augustine Knapp.jpg
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit
In office
January 1, 1916 – February 10, 1923
Preceded by Seat established
Succeeded by Seat abolished
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
In office
December 20, 1910 – January 1, 1916
Appointed by William Taft
Preceded by Seat established
Succeeded by Seat abolished
Judge of the United States Commerce Court
In office
December 20, 1910 – December 13, 1913
Appointed by William Taft
Preceded by Seat established
Succeeded by Seat abolished
Personal details
Born (1843-11-06)November 6, 1843
Spafford, New York, U.S.
Died February 10, 1923(1923-02-10) (aged 79)
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Alma mater Wesleyan University
Signature

Martin Augustine Knapp (November 6, 1843 – February 10, 1923) was a United States federal judge.

Biography[edit]

Born in Spafford, New York, Knapp received a B.A. from Wesleyan University in 1868 and read law to enter the Bar in 1869. He entered private practice in Syracuse, New York in 1870, and was counsel for the municipal corporation of Syracuse 1877 to 1883. In 1891, he was appointed to the Interstate Commerce Commission by President Benjamin Harrison, reappointed in 1897 by President Grover Cleveland, and again reappointed in 1902 by President Theodore Roosevelt, becoming chairman of the Commission from 1898, where he served until 1910. Under the Erdman Act as ex officio mediator, he assisted in the work of settlement of numerous disputes between the public and the railroads.[1][2]

Martin Augustine Knapp, William Lea Chambers and George Wallace William Hanger in 1913

On December 12, 1910, Knapp was nominated by President William H. Taft to a new joint seat on the United States Commerce Court and the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, created by 36 Stat. 539. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 20, 1910, and received his commission the same day. His service on the Commerce Court was terminated on December 13, 1913, due to abolition of the court, and on January 1, 1916, he was reassigned to the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. He served thereafter until his death, in Washington, D.C.

He was appointed a mediator for two years from 4 March 1911, becoming member of the Board of Mediation and Conciliation under the Newlands Act in 1913, by appointment of President Woodrow Wilson. He was a member of several societies, including the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the American Economic Association, American Political Science Association, and the National Geographical Society.[1][2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Wikisource-logo.svg Rines, George Edwin, ed. (1920). "Knapp, Martin Augustine". Encyclopedia Americana. 
  2. ^ a b  Reynolds, Francis J., ed. (1921). "Knapp, Martin Augustine". Collier's New Encyclopedia. New York: P.F. Collier & Son Company. 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]

Legal offices
New seat Judge of the United States Commerce Court
1910–1913
Seat abolished
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
1910–1916
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit
1916–1923