Max Arthur Cohn

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Max Arthur Cohn (1903–1998) was an American artist, born in England. His family emigrated to the United States when he was two years old.[1]

Cohn was one of the artists employed by the New Deal's Works Progress Administration (WPA) during the Great Depression, painting for the Easel Project and the Public Works of Art Project.[2] At this period he took up silk screening, a technique he had learned in a commercial art studio in 1920.[3][4] Cohn is credited with introducing a young Andy Warhol to silkscreen techniques.[1]

Works[edit]

Cohn's works are in MoMa New York, the Chicago Art Institute, and Philadelphia Museum.[5] With Jacob Israel Biegeleisen he authored Silk Screen Stenciling as a Fine Art (1942), expanded to Silk Screen Techniques (1958).[6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Max Arthur Cohn". Smithsonian American Art Museum.
  2. ^ "Max Arthur Cohn Artist Statement". Fine Leaf.
  3. ^ "IFPDA - Artist Max Arthur Cohn". Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  4. ^ "British Museum - Term details Max Arthur Cohn". Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  5. ^ "Max Arthur Cohn, WPAmurals.com". Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  6. ^ Biegeleisen, Jacob Israel; Cohn, Max Arthur (1942). Silk Screen Stenciling as a Fine Art. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Incorporated. Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  7. ^ Biegeleisen, Jacob Israel; Cohn, Max Arthur (1958). Silk Screen Techniques. Courier Corporation. ISBN 9780486204338. Retrieved 29 December 2017.