Max Colpet

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Max Colpet (also known as Max Kolpe, real name Max Kolpenitzky, 19 July 1905 – 2 January 1998) was an American writer, scriptwriter and lyricist of Russian-German descent.

Life[edit]

He was born to a Russian Jewish family in Königsberg, then in East Prussia. Due to the political situation at the time, he was stateless when born. In 1914 at the start of the war his family fled to the West. In 1928, with Erik Ode, he founded the cabaret Anti in Berlin. In the 1930s he fled again, this time to Paris. His parents died during World War II in concentration camps.

On 14 August 1953 he became an American citizen,[1] but in 1958 he moved to Munich where he lived for the rest of his life. Among other writings, he wrote for the Münchner Lach- und Schießgesellschaft, a cabaret theatre founded by Sammy Drechsel and Dieter Hildebrandt. He had a lifelong friendship with Billy Wilder for whom he wrote five screenplays.[2][3] In Los Angeles, Colpet lived in the guest house behind Wilder's Beverly Hills house, 704 North Beverly Drive, until Wilder sold the house in 1958 and moved to Century City.[4][5]

Selection of German lyrics[edit]

Selected filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Max Kolpenitzky in U.S. Naturalization Record Indexes, 1791-1992 (Indexed in World Archives Project)
  2. ^ Max Colpet: Sag mir, wo die Jahre sind. Erinnerungen eines unverbesserlichen Optimisten. (Where Have All the Years Gone? The Memoir of an Incorrigible Optimist) Ullstein, Frankfurt am Main and Berlin 1991, ISBN 3-548-22011-8. (in German)
  3. ^ Max Colpet on findagrave.com
  4. ^ Maurice Zolotow. Billy Wilder in Hollywood. Limelight Editions (August 1, 2004) p 100
  5. ^ Max Kolpenitzky in U.S. Naturalization Record Indexes, 1791-1992 (Indexed in World Archives Project)

External links[edit]