Minolta A-mount system

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The Minolta A-mount - now in production via Sony's AMC Alpha Mount Camera Division.
The lens side of the mount.

The Minolta A-mount camera system was a line of photographic equipment from Minolta. The system used a lens mount called A-mount, with a flange focal distance 44.50 mm. The new mount was larger than the older SR-mount making old manual lenses incompatible with the new system. The mount is now used by Sony, who bought the SLR camera division from Konica Minolta, Konica and Minolta having merged a few years before.

The Minolta A-mount system was at first marketed as Maxxum in North America and Alpha (or α) in Japan and the rest of Asia. In Europe early Minolta A-mount cameras were initially identified by a 4 digit number followed by AF. The name Dynax was introduced later with the "i" cameras, the second generation of Minolta A-mount camera.

It was originally based around a selection of three 35 mm single-lens reflex (SLR) bodies, the 5000, 7000 and 9000. The system also included an extensive range of auto-focus lenses, flashes, a motor drive and other accessories. Compatible equipment was made by a number of third parties.

In the following years, many different cameras and accessories were added to the range.

The last film-based Alpha AF SLRs produced by Minolta were the Maxxum 50 (aka Dynax 30 and Dynax 40) and the Maxxum 70 (aka Dynax 60 and Alpha 70). The Dynax/Maxxum/α branding was also used on two Konica Minolta digital SLRs, prior to the acquisition by Sony (7D, 5D).[1][2]

When Sony acquired Konica Minolta's camera technologies in 2006 they chose the "α" brand name (already in use by Minolta in Asia) for their new "Sony α" digital SLR system. The Dynax/Maxxum/Alpha lens mount (which was retained from the old cameras) is now officially known as the "α mount system" or "Alpha mount system".[3]

First generation[edit]

Bodies[edit]

7000[edit]

Main article: Minolta Maxxum 7000

The Minolta 7000 was the first successful auto focus SLR using a motor integrated in the camera body. It was released in 1985 together with 11 lenses, 2 flashguns and a complete lineup of accessories. The 7000 featured one AF-sensor, shutter speeds of 1/2000 to 30 seconds, flashsync speed of 1/100s, exposure compensation of +-4EV in 0.5 exposure steps, center-weighted lightmetering and two frames per second film advance. The Maxxum 7000, when first released had the crossed x's in the name Maxxum. Exxon had a registered trademark for the crossed x's and sued Minolta, forcing Minolta to change the way the name was shown.

9000[edit]

Main article: Minolta 9000

The Minolta 9000, a camera aimed at professionals, was released later the same year, and featured shutter speeds of 1/4000 to 30 seconds, center-weighted and spot lightmetering, exposure compensation of +-4EV in 0.5 exposure steps and a flashsync speed of 1/250s. Unlike the 7000, the 9000 had no internal motordrive and thus holds the position as the world's only autofocusing SLR with manual winding, but with the addition of the motor drive MD-90 a photographer could get up to 5 frames per second. The 9000 had a very extensive range of accessories, including several different backs, winding options and screens. The 9000 had a unique function in that, if combined with the Minolta Data Receiver and the Minolta Flash Meter IV meter, readings could be made on the flash meter and transferred wirelessly to the camera, and the camera then triggered from the flash meter.

5000[edit]

The Minolta 5000, Minolta's entry level camera and essentially a downscaled 7000, was released in 1986. It featured shutter speeds of 1/2000 to 4 seconds and BULB, center-weighted lightmetering, exposure compensation of +1EV, flashsync speed of 1/100s and fully automatic programs.

Second generation[edit]

Bodies[edit]

7000i[edit]

Main article: Minolta 7000i

This camera had the usual Program automatic exposure, Shutter priority automatic exposure, Aperture priority automatic exposure and metered manual exposure modes (standard on the 7000), TTL autoflash (like the 7000) and added a newer faster and more sensitive AF system, faster film advance, new flash hot-shoe that was incompatible with the older flash system (although an adapter was available and the 7/8000i supported the x000-era CG-1000 "flash handle" for backwards compatibility). The 7000i supported the Maxxum lens system, and other previously introduced accessories such as the remote cords. Perhaps more innovative and unusual than any other improvement was the expansion card system. While also used in other models in the i-series, some models in the xi-series, and the 700si, the Minolta Creative Expansion Card System debuted on this model. The expansion card system provided a way to add features to the camera, such as multi-spot metering, or re-program the built-in AE modes to favor faster shutter speeds or smaller apertures, such as the sports action card. While most of the cards' functions and effects could be duplicated by a technically knowledgeable photographer using the camera without the expansion cards, the card system was handy for less technically skilled users who just wanted to photograph their child's soccer/football team for example, without needing to learn about exposure settings and the effect they might have on how a picture "looked". These cards were the forerunners of today's "picture/creativity modes". This camera was aimed at the same market as the 7000.

5000i[edit]

Main article: Minolta 5000i

Built-in flash with a zoom head, programmed AE and metered manual exposure out of the box, adding the A/S expansion card provided two additional AE modes, Shutter-priority and Aperture-priority. A fairly direct replacement for the earlier 5000.

8000i[edit]

Essentially added a PC flash-sync terminal, ME capability, spot metering and faster shutter to the 7000i feature-set. This camera was not a direct replacement for the earlier 9000, and lacked some features such as depth-of-field preview, but offered some additional features that were not on the 7000i. This camera was available in white as well, together with matched white 35-105 lens and 5200i flash.

3000i[edit]

An entry level camera, exposure mode was program AE only, with a high-speed program option, no Creative Expansion Card support. An even more basic Maxxum, this camera was basically for the point-and-shoot user that wanted a system SLR camera with interchangeable lenses and more powerful flashes, but didn't want the features on, or didn't want to pay for the 5000i, 7000i, 8000i cameras.

Third generation[edit]

Bodies[edit]

2xi[edit]

An entry-level model, the plastic-bodied 2xi features a program mode (p-mode), Shutter priority mode(s-mode), aperture priority mode(a-mode), and fully manual mode(m-mode). There is also a self-timer feature, a manual / auto focus switch for use with the series of auto focus lenses, hot shoe mount compatible with i and xi flashes, and a tripod mount.

3xi[edit]

QTsi[edit]

GT[edit]

5xi[edit]

TYPE: 35mm SLR with autofocus, autoexposure, built-in motor drive and flash.

FORMAT: 24 x 35mm cartridge film.

LENSES: Minolta AF, Minolta AFxi.

LENS MOUNT: Minolta A-type bayonet mount.

VIEWFINDER: Eye-level pentaprism, 92% (vertical), 94% (horizontal) coverage.

FOCUSING SCREEN: Acute-Matte, fixed.

VIEWFINDER INFORMATION: Focus/spot metering frames, flash on/ready indicators; camera shake warning; focus signal; shutter speed and aperture LEDs; exposure compensation warning; spot metering indicator.

METERING SYSTEM: 8-segment honeycomb metering, spot metering.

EXPOSURE MODES: Program AE with shift, aperture-priority, shutter-priority, metered manual.

METERING RANGE: EV0-20 (honeycomb); EV3-20 (spot).

FILM SPEED SETTING: DX coding, lSO 25-5000 in 1/3step increments. Non-DX coded film defaults to ISO 100.

AUTOFOCUS SYSTEM: TTL phase-detection system with horizontal CCD array; activated by eye-start. Built-in (flash) AF illuminator, range 1-5m.

FOCUS MODES: Single shot, predictive; powered manual.

SHUTTER: Electronicolly controlled vertical-travel focal-plane type.

SHUTTER SPEEDS: 1/2000s - 30sec, plus bulb in 1/2 stop increments.

FLASH: Built-in retractable type, GN 14 (Metric, ISO 100). Flash activates automatically when needed in P mode, otherwise when popped up. Flash will only combine with external flash when used off-camera.

FLASH SYNCHRONISATION: 1/90s (P,A modes), 1/60s (S mode). Slow-shutter synch possible by pressing spot metering button.

SELF-TIMER: Electronic, l0-second delay, cancellable. When raised, flash pulses as warning before shutter releases.

FILM TRANSPORT: Auto to first frame, single frame advance or continuous 1 fps. Auto rewind at end of roll (film wound right back into cassette).

EXPOSURE COMPENSATION: +/- 4 stops in half stop increments.

AUTOMATIC EXPOSURE BRACKETING: Possible via EB Card.

MULTIPLE EXPOSURE: Possible via ME Card.

CREATIVE EXPANSION CARDS:Travel, child, depth control, sports action, portrait, closeup, multiple exposure, exposure bracketing, flash bracketing.

POWER SOURCE: 2CR5 6V lithium battery.

DIMENSIONS: 153(W) x 99(H) x 69(D)mm.

WEIGHT: 575g (with battery, without lens).

7xi[edit]

9xi

9xi[edit]

Main article: Minolta 9xi

The Minolta 9xi was the flagship of the xi series cameras.

Fourth generation[edit]

Bodies[edit]

300si[edit]

This camera is known by several names and variations, it features full automatic program, and 5 preset programs. Manual control is not an option. It has a prominent visible built in flash and was released in 1995, the ISO settings range 25-5000, the focal plane shutter speeds: 30 seconds - 1/2000. It is considered an entry level camera because of the lack of manual, shutter, or aperture, priority capability.

400si[edit]

500si[edit]

550si panorama date[edit]

The Minolta Dynax 500 si (European name) was introduced in 1994. Budget version of Minolta Dynax 700si with built-in programs instead of program cards

505si[edit]

600si[edit]

The Minolta 600si Classic (aka Maxxum 600si and alpha 507si), introduced in 1995, featured classic controls for most functions. This meant that the 600si had many dials and knobs rather than a menu system. The top plate of the camera included separate dials for exposure compensation, flash compensation, exposure mode and drive mode, and other functions were controlled by further knobs elsewhere. The advantage to the photographer was that almost all settings were readily identified even when the camera was not switched on - just like a classic camera.

The 600si did not have a P (panic) mode to reset all functions, nor was it possible to store favourite combinations of settings or use cards from the 700si card system. The 600si could be used with the VC-600 vertical control grip for a second set of controls and additional battery options.

650si[edit]

The 650si was effectively a 600si with the addition of date/time imprinting and a built in panorama mask, restricting the film image to 12mm x 36mm.

700si[edit]

800si[edit]

Minolta Maxxum 800si with VC-700 grip and 50mm f/1.7 lens

The Minolta 800si, released in 1997, was the flagship of the si series cameras before the 5th generation single digit series. It can be seen as a stop-gap measure to fill the "semi-pro" niche between the 1993 700si and the 2000 Dynax 7. This camera has a very high powered pop-up flash, one of the most powerful built-in flashes ever made. The 800si added a lot more features over its predecessor the 700si, at the expense of the 700si's card system, which most consumers at this time considered of little use due to the widespread integration of features into camera bodies. The 700si's vertical control grip, the VC-700, can also fit the 800si.

Fifth generation[edit]

9[edit]

The Alpha/Dynax/Maxxum 9, Minolta's last professional film body, was released in 1998 and started the 5th and final generation of their 35mm autofocus camera line. The camera is constructed with a zinc and aluminium cast frame covered by SUS304 stainless steel panels, uncommon for cameras, and can tolerate large amounts of abuse at the expense of some added weight. A vertical control grip (VC-9) mirroring the cameras basic controls was available. The camera had a maximum shutter speed capability of 1/12000 second due to carbon-fiber reinforced shutter blades, and a maximum frame rate of 5.5 frames/second. The camera just preceded the release of the SSM (SuperSonic Motor) lenses and D distance encoded lens/flash system, and as a result an upgrade was available in order to support the SSM lenses and D function. This upgrade was in the form of a complete systems board, unlike digital cameras which are usually upgradeable by software. Like all autofocusing Minolta SLR cameras it used the Minolta 'A-series' bayonet lens mounting system.

The 9 was the first Minolta to use a radically different user layout, with lots of buttons, instead of the "computerized" interfaces tried earlier especially in the i and xi series. The more classic interface was first "tested" in a si series camera, the 600si Classic (which in essence was a 700si with a different interface) and garnered positive response. This interface was then refined and proved to be a major hit with consumers and reviewers alike, was largely copied over to the Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D, and also kept in later advanced amateur/professional Sony digital cameras. The vertical control grip was also the first to feature a slightly lowered handgrip and shutter button, for better ergonomy in vertical shooting. This style of grip has also been featured in later Minolta and Sony models.

Also a titanium version of this camera was available as the 9Ti. The 9Ti had the same features as its regular counterpart with the exception of the silver finish and lighter weight of the titanium shell, a "wet type" rubber grip, knobs with relief labels in orange color instead of the standard model's knobs with phosphorescent paint, and a brown leather shoulder strap. It also received four additional custom functions for a total of 25. A lighter magnesium vertical grip VC-9M was available as well. The camera came out in 1999 in limited quantities only and with 4-digit serial numbers. It was sold out in 2001 already. A small batch of Dynax 9Ti bodies with 8-digit serial numbers in the #199011xx range and lacking the accessories surfaced in Germany between 2002 and 2006 (presumably assembled by Minolta's European Service Center in Bremen from 9Ti spare parts), dubbed the Dynax 9Ti II to distinguish it from the original 4-digit limited series of the 9Ti.

In the second and third hardware revision of the 9, including all SSM/ADI upgraded units, a special procedure (requiring no tools) can be utilized to reconfigure the camera to behave like the 9Ti and subsequently invoke the limited model's extra functions also in the black model.[4]

See also: Minolta Maxxum 9 (de)

7[edit]

Dynax 7 w/ 28-100 mm lens, VC-7 vertical grip and 5600HS flash

The 7 is generally considered even more advanced in many respects than the Alpha/Dynax/Maxxum 9, making it the most advanced Alpha/Dynax/Maxxum. Amongst its many unusual features, it had a function which could emulate the 135 mm STF (Smooth Transition Focus) lens by doing multiple exposures while varying the aperture — something done neither before nor since. The 7 was the first camera to support SSM lenses. Perhaps most noteworthy and radical was a huge LCD navigation display on the rear of the camera's film door. This offered a full operational view without the need of constant referral to the operating manual. It also eased operation of the 35 custom functions to change camera settings. Also, the 7 featured a plethora of dials and buttons as opposed to the "hold button while turning wheel" interface many of its other contemporaries offered. This interface was a direct evolution from the 9 and 600si Classic and later continued in other pro- and semi-pro models.

MinoltaDynax7honeycomb.jpeg

This Maxxum offered the maximum shutter speed of 1/8000, a maximum frame rate of 4 frames/second, autofocus control with a 16-bit CPU coupled with a 14-segment honeycomb-pattern metering and the support of Minolta's ADI (Advanced Distance Integration) with its "D" series lenses. Also for the professional–enthusiast was the vertical control grip (VC-7) that replicated some basic controls for vertical shooting and extending shooting time with extra batteries. There was also a film chamber lock to avoid accidental exposure of film that is still loaded. The Alpha/Dynax/Maxxum 7 was noted to be a good camera among many photographers and rave reviews on the Internet and magazines alike.[citation needed]

In some markets a limited edition of the camera became available in 2001 as Dynax 7 Limited and Alpha 7 Limited (there was no Maxxum variant of this model). It featured a larger internal film data memory, a slightly more refined finish of the exterior and golden-colored labels. Like the 9Ti it had 4-digit serial numbers, except for the Chinese Alpha 7 Limited II model, which had 8-digit serial numbers. Also featuring a larger internal memory, there was a variant of the normal Alpha 7 named Alpha 7 CNM (Chinese navigation model) specifically for the Chinese market.

5[edit]

Maxxum 5 w/ 28-80mm lens

The 5 was an easy-to-use, compact, and feature-packed film camera using core technologies from the Minolta Alpha/Dynax/Maxxum 7. The Alpha/Dynax/Maxxum 5 incorporated advanced autofocus (AF) technology, powerful film drive, relatively fast shutter speeds, and several creative features including 14 custom functions, into a small and light silver-colored SLR camera body. Like all other autofocus Minolta cameras, it used the same lenses initially offered in the mid-1980s. Also available was a battery grip (BP-200) for extended 35 mm film shooting.

The Maxxum 3 and Maxxum 4 are based on this Minolta, being less feature-rich entry-level cameras. This fifth generation (Alpha/Dynax/Maxxum 3/4/5, 7 & 9) were the last full generation of film cameras that Minolta made with only two more film cameras (Alpha/Dynax/Maxxum 60 and 40) produced before merging with Konica and leaving the 35 mm camera business all together.

Sixth generation[edit]

40[edit]

First of two sixth generation Minolta film cameras. Entry level camera which took the crown as lightest and smallest AF 35mm SLR.

Digital SLR bodies[edit]

5D[edit]

7D[edit]

Lenses[edit]

List of Minolta A-mount lenses:

Name MPN Lens ID Type Format Mount Filter Distance encoder AF-D support Aberration correction Release date Comments

Minolta AF Fish-Eye 16mm f/2.8 (original revision) 2578-100,[5] 2578-600[5] 25781[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[5] Built-in (NORMAL, O56, FLW, B12)[5] No No No 1986 Fisheye lens; first 600 units used a different barrel construction internally;[5] optically similar to the Minolta MC Fish-Eye Rokkor 16mm f/2.8 (aka Leica Fisheye-Elmarit-R 16mm f/2.8) produced up to 1981 with an optical design originally introduced in 1966/1968.

Minolta AF Fish-Eye 16mm f/2.8 (later revision) 2578-110, 2578-610[7] 25781[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin Built-in (NORMAL, O56, A12, B12) No No No  ? Fisheye lens; same design as before except for different built-in filters; succeeded by Sony SAL-16F28

Minolta AF 20mm f/2.8 2579-100,[8] 2579-600,[8] 2579-610[7] 25791[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[8] 72mm[8] No No No 1986

Minolta AF 20mm f/2.8 New 2641-110 25791[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 72mm No No Camera 1993 Restyled design; succeeded by Sony SAL-20F28

Minolta AF 24mm f/2.8 2566-100,[9] 2566-110, 2566-600,[9] 2566-610[10] 25661[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[9] 55mm[9] No No No 1985-01[10]

Minolta AF 24mm f/2.8 New 2642-110 25661[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1994 Restyled design

Minolta AF 28mm f/2 2596-100,[11] 2596-600,[11] 2596-610[7] 25961[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[11] 55mm[11] No No No 1986

Minolta AF 28mm f/2 New 2668-118 25961[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1999 Restyled design

Minolta AF 28mm f/2.8 2557-100,[12] 2557-600[10][12] 25571[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[12] 49mm[12] No No Camera 1985-01[10] Succeeded by Sony SAL-28F28

Minolta AF 35mm f/1.4 2591-100,[13] 2591-110, 2591-600,[13] 2591-610[7] 25911[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[13] 55mm[13] No No No 1987

Minolta AF 35mm f/1.4 G New 2666-118 19 Prime 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1998 Succeeded by Sony SAL-35F14G

Konica Minolta AF 35mm f/1.4 G (D)  ? 43 Prime 35mm 8-pin 55mm Yes Camera (since 2013-02-05) Camera N/A (2005-07[14][15][16]) Prototype only; revised optics; succeeded by Sony SAL-35F14G

Minolta AF 35mm f/2 2597-100,[17] 2597-110, 2597-600,[17] 2597-610[7] 25971[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[17] 55mm[17] No No No 1987

Minolta AF 35mm f/2 New 2667-118 25971[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1999 Restyled design

Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4 2562-100,[18] 2562-600[10][18] 25621[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[18] 49mm[18] No No No 1985-01[10] Also available as calibrated version in conjunction with Minolta CS-1000A spectroradiometer[19]

Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4 New 2662-110 25621[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1998 Restyled design; succeeded by Sony SAL-50F14

Minolta AF 50mm f/1.7 2550-100,[20] 2550-600[10][20] 25501[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[20] 49mm[20] No No No 1985-01[10] Original revision had metal focusing helicoid internally, while later revision was made of plastics[21]

Minolta AF 50mm f/1.7 New 2613-100, 2613-600 26131[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 49mm No No No 1990 Restyled design; revised optics

Minolta AF Macro 50mm f/2.8 2564-100,[22] 2564-600[10][22] 25641[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[22] 55mm[22] No No No 1985-01[10] 1:1 max.[22]

Minolta AF Macro 50mm f/2.8 New 2638-100 25641? Prime 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1993 1:1 max.; restyled design; also available as calibrated version in conjunction with Minolta CS-1000A spectroradiometer[19]

Minolta AF Macro 50mm f/2.8 (D) 2675-100 31[6] Prime 35mm 8-pin 55mm Yes Camera (since 2013-02-05) Camera 2001 1:1 max.; succeeded by Sony SAL-50M28

Minolta AF Macro 50mm f/3.5 2646-100 9[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1995 1:2 max.

Minolta AF 85mm f/1.4 2592-100,[23] 2592-600,[23] 2592-610[7] 25921? Prime 35mm 5-pin[23] 72mm[23] No No No 1987

Minolta AF 85mm f/1.4 G 2629-118 25921? or 27? Prime 35mm 5-pin 72mm No No No 1993 Restyled design

Minolta AF 85mm f/1.4 G (D) 2677-118 27 Prime 35mm 8-pin 72mm Yes No No 2000 Restyled design

Minolta AF 85mm f/1.4 G (D) Limited 2689-118 35 Prime 35mm 8-pin 72mm Yes No No 2002-05[24] (2002-03[24]) Restyled design; revised optics; distributed in Japan only (700 units)[24]

Minolta AF 100mm f/2 2598-100,[25] 2598-110, 2598-600,[25] 2598-610[7] 25981[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[25] 55mm[25] No No No 1987

Minolta AF Macro 100mm f/2.8 2581-100,[26] 2581-600,[26] 2581-610[7] 25811[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[26] 55mm[26] No No No 1986 1:1 max.[26]

Minolta AF Macro 100mm f/2.8 New 2639-110 25811? Prime 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1993 1:1 max.; restyled design

Minolta AF Macro 100mm f/2.8 (D) 2676-110 28[6] Prime 35mm 8-pin 55mm Yes Camera (since 2013-02-05) Camera 2000 1:1 max.; succeeded by Sony SAL-100M28

Minolta AF Soft Focus 100mm f/2.8 2648-118 12[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1994 Soft Focus lens

Minolta AF 135mm f/2.8 2556-100,[27] 2556-600[10][27] 25561[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin[27] 55mm[27] No No No 1985-01[10]

Minolta STF 135mm f/2.8 [T4.5] 2656-118 20[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 72mm No No No 1999 Smooth Trans Focus; manual focus; aperture ring; succeeded by Sony SAL-135F28

Minolta AF Apo Tele 200mm f/2.8 G 2593-100,[28] 2593-600,[28] 2593-610[7] 25931 Prime 35mm 5-pin[28] 72mm[28] No No No 1986 Without "High Speed" gearing and sticker and without focus-stop button; white finish

Minolta AF Apo Tele 200mm f/2.8 G (High Speed upgrade) Custom upgrade by Minolta service (based on 2593) 26121? Prime 35mm 5-pin 72mm No No No 1988? With High Speed gearing, but without "High Speed" sticker and without focus-stop button; white finish

Minolta High Speed AF Apo Tele 200mm f/2.8 G New 2612-110, 2612-610[29] 26121[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 72mm No No No 1988?, 1989-03[29] With "High Speed" label and focus-stop button; white finish

Minolta AF Apo Tele Macro 200mm f/4 G 2658-118 23[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 72mm No No No 1999 1:1 max.; also available as calibrated version in conjunction with Minolta CS-1000T spectroradiometer[19]

Minolta AF Apo Tele 300mm f/2.8 G (original revision) 2563-626[10] 25631 Prime 35mm 5-pin 114mm (front) / 42mm (slot-in) No No No 1985-01[10] 7-digit serial number; no CLR front filter; tripod knob to the right;[30] without "High Speed" gearing and sticker and without focus-stop buttons; optically based on an SR-mount Minolta MD Apo Tele Rokkor 300mm f/2.8 prototype;[31] white finish

Minolta AF Apo Tele 300mm f/2.8 G (later revision) 2563-100, 2563-636[32] 25631 Prime 35mm 5-pin 114mm (front) / 42mm (slot-in) No No No 1986[32] 8-digit serial number; with CLR front filter; tripod knob to the left; without "High Speed" gearing and sticker and without focus-stop buttons; white finish

Minolta AF Apo Tele 300mm f/2.8 G (High Speed upgrade) Custom upgrade by Minolta service (based on 2563) 26081? Prime 35mm 5-pin 114mm (front) / 42mm (slot-in) No No No 1988? 8-digit serial number; with CLR front filter; tripod knob to the left; with "High Speed" gearing, but without "High Speed" sticker and without focus-stop buttons; white finish

Minolta High Speed AF Apo Tele 300mm f/2.8 G New 2608-136, 2608-636[29] 26081[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 114mm (front) / 42mm (slot-in) No No No 1988?, 1989-03[29] 8-digit serial number; with CLR front filter; tripod knob to the left; with "High Speed" label and focus-stop buttons; white finish

Minolta AF Apo Tele 300mm f/2.8 G (D) SSM 2674-118 32 Prime 35mm 8-pin None (front) / 42mm (slot-in) Yes Camera (since 2013-02-05) No 2003 (2002-03[24]) White finish; succeeded by Sony SAL-300F28G

Minolta High Speed AF Apo Tele 300mm f/4 G 2640-128 11[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 82mm (front) / 42mm (slot-in) No No No 1994 White finish

Minolta High Speed AF Apo Tele 400mm f/4.5 G 2651-116 15[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 95mm (front) / 42mm (slot-in) No No No 1995 White finish

Minolta AF Reflex 500mm f/8 2572-118, 2572-618[29] 25721 Prime 35mm 5-pin 82mm (front) / 28mm (slot-in) / 42mm (slot-in) No No No 1989-03[29] Catadioptric lens; succeeded by Sony SAL-500F80

Minolta AF Apo Tele 600mm f/4 G 2565-100, 2565-626,[33] 2565-636[32] 25651 Prime 35mm 5-pin 154.5mm (front) / 42mm (slot-in) No No No 1985-08[33] Without "High Speed" gearing and label and without focus-stop buttons; white finish

Minolta AF Apo Tele 600mm f/4 G (High Speed upgrade) Custom upgrade by Minolta service (based on 2565) 26091? Prime 35mm 5-pin 154.5mm (front) / 42mm (slot-in) No No No 1988? With "High Speed" gearing, but without "High Speed" label and without focus-stop buttons; white finish

Minolta High Speed AF Apo Tele 600mm f/4 G New 2609-136, 2609-636[29] 26091[6] Prime 35mm 5-pin 154.5mm (front) / 42mm (slot-in) No No No 1988?, 1989-03[29] With "High Speed" label and with focus-stop buttons; white finish

Minolta AF Macro Zoom 3×-1× f/1.7-2.8 2594-116, 2594-616 25941[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin 46mm No No No 1990 3:1 max.; white finish; also available as calibrated version in conjunction with Minolta CS-1000S spectroradiometer[19]

Konica Minolta AF Zoom DT 11-18mm f/4.5-5.6 (D) 2698-110 41 Zoom APS-C 8-pin 77mm Yes No No 2005 Derivation of Tamron SP AF 11-18mm f/4.5-5.6 Di II LD Aspherical [IF] (model A13M) design; succeeded by Sony SAL-1118

Konica Minolta AF Zoom 17-35mm f/2.8-4 (D) 2695-110 38[6] Zoom 35mm 8-pin 77mm Yes No No 2004 Derivation of Tamron SP AF 17-35mm f/2.8-4 Di LD Aspherical [IF] (model A05M) design; black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 17-35mm f/3.5 G 2654-118 16 Zoom 35mm 5-pin 77mm No No No 1997 Black finish

Konica Minolta AF Zoom DT 18-70mm f/3.5-5.6 (D) 2697-810 40[6] Zoom APS-C 8-pin 55mm Yes No No 2005 Succeeded by Sony SAL-1870

Konica Minolta AF Zoom DT 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 (D) 2699-110 42 Zoom APS-C 8-pin 62mm Yes No No 2005 Derivation of Tamron AF 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 XR Di II LD Aspherical [IF] (model A14M) design; succeeded by Sony SAL-18200

Minolta AF Zoom 20-35mm f/3.5-4.5 2657-118 17 Zoom 35mm 5-pin 72mm No No No 1998

Minolta AF Zoom 24-50mm f/4 2558-100,[34] 2558-110, 2558-600,[34] 2558-610[7] 25581[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin[34] 55mm[34] No No No 1987 Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 24-50mm f/4 New 2632-110 26321? Zoom 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1992 Restyled design

Minolta AF Zoom 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 2636-110 6? Zoom 35mm 5-pin 62mm No No No 1993 Also available as limited red-brown Urushi-lacquered Minolta AF Zoom 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 Japan[6] variant

Minolta AF Zoom 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 New 2660-110 6[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin 62mm No No No 1997 Restyled design

Minolta AF Zoom 24-105mm f/3.5-4.5 (D) 2672-110 24[6] Zoom 35mm 8-pin 62mm Yes No No 2000 Succeeded by Sony SAL-24105

Minolta AF Zoom 28-70mm f/2.8 G 2620-118 2 Zoom 35mm 5-pin 72mm No No No 1993 Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 28-70mm f/2.8 G (D) SSM  ? 34? Zoom 35mm 8-pin 77mm Yes No No N/A (2002–03)[24] Prototype only, announced on 2002-03-19 and publically shown up to 2004, but never released; black finish

Konica Minolta AF Zoom 28-75mm f/2.8 (D) 2696-810 39[6] Zoom 35mm 8-pin 67mm Yes No No 2004 Derivation of Tamron SP AF 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di LD Aspherical [IF] Macro (model A09M) design; black finish; succeeded by Sony SAL-2875

Minolta AF Zoom 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 2659-100,[35] 2659-110[35] 4? or 18? Zoom 35mm 5-pin  ? No No No  ?

Minolta AF Zoom 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 II 2670-110,[35] 2670-150,[35] 2670-160[35] 18[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin 62mm No No No 1987 Restyled design

Minolta AF Zoom 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 (D) 2683-900,[35] 2683-910,[35] 2683-950,[35] 2683-960[35] 30 Zoom 35mm 8-pin 55mm Yes No No 2001 Restyled design; black or silver finish

Minolta AF Zoom xi 28-80mm f/4-5.6 2618-110 26181[6] Zoom 35mm 8-pin 55mm No No No 1991 Black finish

Minolta AF Macro Zoom 28-80mm f/4-5.6 New 2633-100,[35][36] 2633-110 3[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin 55mm[36] No No No 1993 Black finish

Minolta AF Macro Zoom 28-85mm f/3.5-4.5 2552-100,[37] 2552-600,[37] 2552-610[10] 25521[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin[37] 55mm[37] No No No 1985-01[10]

Minolta AF Macro Zoom 28-85mm f/3.5-4.5 New 2586-110, 2586-610 0[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1992 Restyled design

Minolta AF Zoom 28-100mm f/3.5-5.6 (D) 2692-810, 2692-860 36[6] Zoom 35mm 8-pin 55mm Yes No No 2003 Black or silver finish

Minolta AF Zoom xi 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 2615-110 26151? Zoom 35mm 8-pin 62mm No No No 1991 Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 2635-110 10[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin 62mm No No No 1994 Restyled design

Minolta AF Zoom 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 New 2661-110 10? Zoom 35mm 5-pin 62mm No No No 1997 Restyled design

Minolta AF Macro Zoom 28-135mm f/4-4.5 2553-100,[38] 2553-600[10][38] 25531[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin[38] 72mm[38] No No No 1985-01[10] Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm f/3.5-4.5 2643-100 5? Zoom 35mm 5-pin 49mm No No No 1993 Black finish; has focusing scale window

Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm f/3.5-4.5 II? / New? 2652-100 5? Zoom 35mm 5-pin 49mm No No No  ? Black finish; has no focusing scale

Minolta AF Macro Zoom 35-70mm f/4 2551-100,[39] 2551-600,[39] 2551-610[10] 25511[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin 49mm No No No 1985-01[10] Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 35-80mm f/4-5.6 2605-100,[40] 2605-110, 2605-600[40][41] 26071[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin[40] 46mm[40] No No No 1988-10[41]

Minolta AF Power Zoom 35-80mm f/4-5.6 2624-110 26241[6] Zoom 35mm 8-pin 49mm No No No 1991 Restyled design; black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 35-80mm f/4-5.6 II 2671-110, 2671-160 22 Zoom 35mm 5-pin 49mm No No No 1999 Restyled design

Minolta AF Macro Zoom 35-105mm f/3.5-4.5 2554-100,[42] 2554-600,[42] 2554-610[10] 25541[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin[42] 55mm[42] No No No 1985-01[10]

Minolta AF Zoom 35-105mm f/3.5-4.5 New 2585-100,[43] 2585-600,[43] 2585-610[41] 25858[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin[43] 55mm[43] No No No 1988-10[41] Restyled design; white finish version available as Minolta AF Zoom 35-105mm f/3.5-4.5 Prestige (2585-110?)[6]

Minolta AF Zoom xi 35-200mm f/4.5-5.6 2616-110, 2616-610 26161? Zoom 35mm 8-pin 62mm No No No 1991 Black finish

Minolta AF Apo Tele Zoom 70-200mm f/2.8 G (D) SSM 2682-118 33[6] Zoom 35mm 8-pin 77mm Yes No No 2003 (2002-03[24]) White finish; succeeded by Sony SAL-70200G

Minolta AF Zoom 70-210mm f/3.5-4.5 2588-100,[44] 2588-600,[44] 2588-610, (2588-810)[41] 25881? Zoom 35mm 5-pin[44] 55mm[44] No No No 1988-10[41]

Minolta AF Zoom 70-210mm f/4 2555-100,[45] 2555-110, 2555-600,[45] 2555-610[10] 25551[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin[45] 55mm[45] No No No 1985-01[10] Optically based on the Minolta MD Zoom 70-210mm f/4 (aka Leica Vario-Elmar-R 70-210mm f/4); black finish, also available as "dealer demo" in transparent housing[6]

Minolta AF Zoom 70-210mm f/4.5-5.6 (New?) 2634-110 8[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin 49mm No No No 1993

Minolta AF Zoom 70-210mm f/4.5-5.6 II 2669-110, 2669-160 8? Zoom 35mm 5-pin 49mm No No No 1999

Minolta AF Zoom 75-300mm f/4.5-5.6 2561-100,[46] 2561-110, 2561-600,[46] 2561-610[33] 25611[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin[46] 55mm[46] No No No 1985-08[33] Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 75-300mm f/4.5-5.6 New 2649-110 13? Zoom 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1996 Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 75-300mm f/4.5-5.6 II 2665-110, 2665-160 13? Zoom 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1999 Black or silver finish

Minolta AF Zoom 75-300mm f/4.5-5.6 (D) 2684-910, 2684-960 29 Zoom 35mm 8-pin 55mm Yes No No 2001 Black or silver finish; succeeded by Sony SAL-75300

Minolta AF Apo Tele Zoom 80-200mm f/2.8 G 2589-100,[47] 2589-600,[47] 2589-610[7] 25891[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin[47] 72mm[47] No No No 1987 Black finish

Minolta High Speed AF Apo Tele Zoom 80-200mm f/2.8 G (New?) 2628-118 1 Zoom 35mm 5-pin 72mm No No No 1993 White finish

Minolta AF Zoom 80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 2604-100,[48] 2604-600[41][48] 26041? Zoom 35mm 5-pin[48] 46mm[48] No No No 1988-10[41] Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom xi 80-200mm f/4.5-5.6 2619-110, 2619-610 26191? Zoom 35mm 8-pin 55mm No No No 1991 Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 100-200mm f/4.5 2560-100,[49] 2560-600,[49] 2560-610,[7] 2560-611[32] 25601 Zoom 35mm 5-pin[49] 49mm[49] No No No 1986[32] Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 2606-100,[50] 2606-110, 2606-600,[50] 2606-610[41] 26061? Zoom 35mm 5-pin[50] 55mm[50] No No No 1988-10[41] Black finish

Minolta AF Zoom xi 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 2621-110 26211? Zoom 35mm 8-pin 55mm No No No 1991 Black finish

Minolta AF Apo Tele Zoom 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 2631-? 7[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1993? Black finish; smooth rubber focus ring

Minolta AF Apo Tele Zoom 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 New 2631-110? 7? Zoom 35mm 5-pin 55mm No No No 1995? Black finish; ribbed focus ring

Minolta AF Apo Tele Zoom 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 (D) 2681-110 25[6] Zoom 35mm 8-pin 55mm Yes No No 2000 Black finish

Minolta AF Apo Tele Zoom 100-400mm f/4.5-6.7 2644-110 14[6] Zoom 35mm 5-pin 72mm No No No 1995 Black finish

Minolta AF 1.4× Tele Converter Apo 2590-100, 2590-600, 2590-607[7] 25901[6] Converter 35mm 5-pin N/A No No No 1986 Not recommended for lenses with "High Speed" gearing; white finish

Minolta AF 1.4× Tele Converter Apo-II 2610-107, 2610-607[29] Lens ID of mounted lens or 65535 (no lens)[6] Converter 35mm 5-pin N/A No No  ? 1988?, 1989-03[29] White finish

Minolta AF 1.4× Tele Converter Apo (D) 2687-107 Lens ID of mounted lens or 65535 (no lens)[6] Converter 35mm 8-pin N/A Yes No  ? 2003 (2002-03[24]) Recommended for SSM/ADI; white finish; succeeded by Sony SAL-14TC

Minolta AF 2× Tele Converter Apo 2601-100, 2601-600, 2601-607[7] 26011[6] Converter 35mm 5-pin N/A No No No 1987 Not recommended for lenses with "High Speed" gearing; white finish

Minolta AF 2× Tele Converter Apo-II 2611-107, 2611-607[29] Lens ID of mounted lens or 65535 (no lens)[6] Converter 35mm 5-pin N/A No No  ? 1988?, 1989-03[29] White finish

Minolta AF 2× Tele Converter Apo (D) 2688-107 Lens ID of mounted lens or 65535 (no lens)[6] Converter 35mm 8-pin N/A Yes No  ? 2003 (2002-03[24]) Recommended for SSM/ADI; white finish; succeeded by Sony SAL-20TC

Minolta AF 2× M/A Converter-S 2583-107[33] 65535[6] (no chip) Converter 35mm 0-pin N/A No No No 1985-08[33] For use of SR-mount lenses shorter than 300mm on A-mount bodies; black finish; optically identical to Minolta MD 2× Tele Converter 300-S

Minolta AF 2× M/A Converter-L 2584-107,[32] (2583-207)[33] 65535[6] (no chip) Converter 35mm 0-pin N/A No No No 1985-08[33] For use of SR-mount lenses longer than 300mm on A-mount bodies; black finish; optically identical to Minolta MD 2× Tele Converter 300-L

Minolta AF Master Lens 50mm f/1.7 2072-0006-75 25501? Master 35mm 5-pin 49mm No No No 1985 Specially calibrated lens with fixed focus and fixed aperture for camera service; optics based on Minolta AF 50mm f/1.7 (2550-100, 2550-600); cannot be used for normal photography; black finish
Apo Apochromatic lens element(s)
(D) or D "Distance encoder", lens provides subject distance information for utilization in the Advanced Distance Integration (ADI) flash mode and other features. While the "(D)" designation is used on the box and in the documentation, the lenses just feature a "D" instead. Requires 8 lens contacts; lenses with only 5 contacts cannot support this feature.
DT "Digital Technology", lenses for cameras with APS-C (or Super-35mm) size sensors, only. Cannot reasonably be used on 24x36mm full-frame cameras.
G "Gold" series, Minolta's line-up of high-grade lenses. The "G" status does not occur as label on the lenses, but is indicated by a decorating ring on the lens.
High Speed High Speed upgraded gearing for faster autofocus. As indicated, three lenses were upgradeable in authorized service centers as well.
II Version II. Some lenses underwent more than just cosmetic changes, and are referred to as second version, in particular, when the optics have changed completely.
New Restyled (not a designation found on the lens), aesthetic changes (such lenses were labelled "New" or "Neu" or "(N)" on the box and in the documentation by Minolta, but not specifically labelled on the lens itself).
SSM "SuperSonic Motor", silent in-lens ultrasonic motor used on some lenses. Requires 8 lens contacts; lenses with only 5 contacts cannot support this feature. Can be used with manual focusing on cameras without SSM support (that is, Minolta film bodies released before 2000 - Minolta Dynax/Maxxum/α-9/9Ti can be upgraded by service).[51][52][53][54]
Power or xi Motorized zoom. Requires 8 lens contacts; lenses with only 5 contacts cannot support this feature.

Third-party lenses[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nakamura, Karen, News: Recent top-five camera sales in Japan, photoethnography.com. Article written 2005-02-14, retrieved 2006-12-14. (Note Maxxum/Alpha digital camera name in list).
  2. ^ Minolta Dynax 7D review, ephotozine. Article retrieved 2006-12-14. (Note Dynax digital camera name).
  3. ^ "Sony decides α as new brand for digital Single Lens Reflex (SLR) cameras" (Press release). Sony. 2006-04-20. Retrieved 2006-09-29. 
  4. ^ Paul, Matthias (2010-12-24). "Beschreibung einer Freischaltprozedur für Dynax 9Ti-Sonderfunktionen bei der Dynax 9" [Description of a hidden procedure to enable the Dynax 9Ti extra functions on the Dynax 9] (in German). Retrieved 2014-05-01. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF FISH-EYE 16mm F2.8 (2578-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF FISH-EYE 16mm F2.8 (2578-600). Minolta. 1986. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br Paul, Matthias (2013-03-03) [2006]. "A-Bajonett-Objektiv-IDs / A-Mount Lens IDs, Welche ID hat welches Objektiv wirklich?" [A-mount lens IDs - Which lenses are verified to have which IDs?] (in German). Minolta-Forum. Retrieved 2015-07-09. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Canadian Minolta dealer price list 1988-03-30. Minolta Canada, Inc. 1988-03-30. Retrieved 2015-07-08. 
  8. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 20mm F2.8 (2579-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 20mm F2.8 (2579-600). Minolta. 1986. 
  9. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 24mm F2.8 (2566-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 24mm F2.8 (2566-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Canadian Minolta dealer price list 1985-01-23. Minolta Canada, Inc. 1985-01-23. Retrieved 2015-07-08. 
  11. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 28mm F2 (2596-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 28mm F2 (2596-600). Minolta. 1986. 
  12. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 28mm F2.8 (2557-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 28mm F2.8 (2557-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  13. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 35mm F1.4 (2591-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 35mm F1.4 (2591-600). Minolta. 1987. 
  14. ^ "αシリーズ用新交換レンズ『コニカミノルタ AF 35mm F1.4G (D)』(仮称)を開発" [New interchangeable lens for α series: Development of "Konica Minolta AF 35mm F1.4 G (D)" (tentative name)] (in Japanese). Konica Minolta, Inc. 2005-07-15. Retrieved 2015-07-08. 
  15. ^ "Development of "Konica Minolta AF 35mm F1.4 G (D)" - Interchangeable Lens for SLR Cameras of the Dynax/Maxxum Series". Konica Minolta Photo Imaging, Inc. 2005-07-15. Retrieved 2015-07-09. 
  16. ^ "Konica Minolta AF 35 mm F1.4G D lens - Konica Minolta press release: Development of "Konica Minolta AF 35mm F1.4G (D)"". dpreview. 2005-07-15. Retrieved 2015-07-08. 
  17. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 35mm F2 (2597-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 35mm F2 (2597-600). Minolta. 1987. 
  18. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 50mm F1.4 (2562-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 50mm F1.4 (2562-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  19. ^ a b c d Paul, Matthias (2008-07-11). ""Spezialkamera" Minolta CS-1000: Spektroradiometer" [Special camera Minolta CS-1000] (in German). Minolta-Forum. Retrieved 2015-07-06. 
  20. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 50mm F1.7 (2550-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 50mm F1.7 (2550-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  21. ^ Lemp, Kristof (2006-11-07). "Minolta AF 50mm/1,7: Unterschiede 1./2. Generation" (in German). Minolta-Forum. Retrieved 2015-07-11. 
  22. ^ a b c d e Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 50mm F2.8 MACRO (2564-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 50mm F2.8 MACRO (2564-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  23. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 85mm F1.4 (2592-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 85mm F1.4 (2592-600). Minolta. 1987. 
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h "「PHOTO EXPO 2002」出展のご案内" [Photo Expo 2002 Exhibition Guide] (in Japanese). Minolta Japan. 2002-03-19. Archived from the original on 2002-03-21. Retrieved 2015-07-08. : "Photo Expo 2002: Minolta Japan announces the availability of 700 units of the Minolta AF 85mm F1.4 G (D) Limited in Japan from 2002-05-05 as well as the development of future SSM full-frame lenses with tentative names Minolta AF Zoom 28-70mm F2.8 G (D) SSM, Minolta AF Apo Tele Zoom 70-200mm F2.8 G (D) SSM, Minolta AF Apo Tele 300mm F2.8 G (D) SSM, Minolta AF 1.4x Tele Converter Apo (D), Minolta AF 2x Tele Converter Apo (D)."
  25. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 100mm F2 (2598-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 100mm F2 (2598-600). Minolta. 1987. 
  26. ^ a b c d e Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF MACRO 100mm F2.8 (32) (2581-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF MACRO 100mm F2.8 (32) (2581-600). Minolta. 1986. 
  27. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 135mm F2.8 (2556-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 135mm F2.8 (2556-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  28. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 200mm F2.8 APO TELE (2593-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 200mm F2.8 APO TELE (2593-600). Minolta. 1986. 
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Canadian Minolta dealer price list 1989-03-20. Minolta Canada, Inc. 1989-03-20. Retrieved 2015-07-08. 
  30. ^ Andreas (2010-02-28). "Minolta AF 300mm/2.8 APO - Original-Lieferumfang" [Minolta AF 300mm/2.8 APO original setup] (in German). Minolta-Forum. Retrieved 2015-07-06. 
  31. ^ Lohmann, Dennis (2006-07-01). "Minolta MD APO Tele Rokkor 300mm 1:2.8, Prototyp" (in German). Minolta-Forum. Retrieved 2015-06-07. 
  32. ^ a b c d e f Canadian Minolta dealer price list 1986-06-21. Minolta Canada, Inc. 1986-06-21. Retrieved 2015-07-08. 
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h Canadian Minolta dealer price list 1985-08-26. Minolta Canada, Inc. 1985-08-26. Retrieved 2015-07-08. 
  34. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF 24-50mm F4 (2558-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF 24-50mm F4 (2558-600). Minolta. 1987. 
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Paul, Matthias (2012-05-16) [2008]. "Some infos on Minolta lenses 2633, 2659, 2670, 2683" (in German). Minolta-Forum. Retrieved 2015-07-08. 
  36. ^ a b Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 28-80mm F4-F5.6 (NEW) (2633-100). Minolta. 1985. 
  37. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 28-85mm F3.5-F4.5 (2552-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 28-85mm F3.5-F4.5 (2552-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  38. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 28-135mm F4-F4.5 (2553-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 28-135mm F4-F4.5 (2553-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  39. ^ a b Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 35-70mm F4 (2551-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 35-70mm F4 (2551-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  40. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 35-80mm F4(32)-5.6 (2605-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 35-80mm F4(32)-5.6 (2605-600). Minolta. 1988. 
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Canadian Minolta dealer price list 1988-10-01. Minolta Canada, Inc. 1988-10-01. Retrieved 2015-07-08. 
  42. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 35-105mm F3.5-F4.5 (2554-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 35-105mm F3.5-F4.5 (2554-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  43. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 35-105mm F3.5(22)-4.5 (2585-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 35-105mm F3.5(22)-4.5 (2585-600). Minolta. 1988. 
  44. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 70-210mm F3.5(22)-4.5 (2588-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 70-210mm F3.5(22)-4.5 (2588-600). Minolta. 1988. 
  45. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 70-210mm F4 (2555-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 70-210mm F4 (2555-600). Minolta. 1985. 
  46. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 75-300mm F4.5(32)-5.6 (2561-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 75-300mm F4.5(32)-5.6 (2561-600). Minolta. 1986. 
  47. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 80-200mm F2.8 (2589-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 80-200mm F2.8 (2589-600). Minolta. 1987. 
  48. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 80-200mm F4.5(22)-5.6 (2604-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 80-200mm F4.5(22)-5.6 (2604-600). Minolta. 1988. 
  49. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 100-200mm F4.5 (22) (2560-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 100-200mm F4.5 (22) (2560-600). Minolta. 1988. 
  50. ^ a b c d Service Manual / Repair Guide: MINOLTA AF ZOOM 100-300mm F4.5(32)-5.6 (2606-100) / MINOLTA MAXXUM AF ZOOM 100-300mm F4.5(32)-5.6 (2606-600). Minolta. 1988. 
  51. ^ Minolta Co., Ltd. / Minolta Europe GmbH, Osaka / Langenhagen (2003). Faltblatt für Kunden der Dynax 9 mit SSM-Objektiven: For users of the Dynax 9 / Pour les utilisateurs du Dynax 9 / Für Benutzer der Dynax 9 / Para usuarios de la Dynax 9 (in German). Minolta-Forum. 9222-2682-22 P-A307. Retrieved 2011-01-08.  [1]
  52. ^ Minolta Co., Ltd., Osaka. Minolta-Hotline-Fax vom 2004-05-10, 2 Seiten: Dynax/Maxxum 9/9Ti – SSM Lens Update Camera Instruction Manual (in German). Minolta-Forum. Retrieved 2011-01-08.  [2]
  53. ^ Paul, Matthias (2009-02-23). "Petition zur Wiederaufnahme des SSM-Umrüstservice" (in German). Minolta-Forum. Retrieved 2011-01-08. 
  54. ^ Wendt-Fröhlich, Daniel (2009-04-28). "Die weltweit letzten 200 SSM-/ADI-Umrüstsätze können seit April 2009 von Runtime verbaut werden". Erfolgsmeldung zur Petition bzgl. der Wiederaufnahme des Umrüstservice im Minolta-Forum vom 2009-04-28 (in German). Minolta-Forum. Retrieved 2011-01-08. 

External links[edit]