Moscow Nights (film)

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This film is not to be confused with the very popular Russian Song Moscow Nights

Moscow Nights (released as I Stand Condemned in the United States) is a 1935 British drama film directed by Anthony Asquith and starring Laurence Olivier, Penelope Dudley-Ward and Harry Baur. The screenplay concerns a wounded officer who falls in love with his nurse.

Plot summary[edit]

During the First World War a wounded Russian officer Captain Ignatoff falls in love with his nurse.[1][2]


Critical response[edit]

Writing for The Spectator in 1935, Graham Greene called the film "completely bogus", and "the worst, as well as the most ballyhooed, film of the year". Asquith and Dudley-Ward were criticized in particular, with Green describing Asquith's direction as puerile, and Dudley-Ward's acting as "country-house charades". Although Greene praised the acting from the rest of the film's stars, and noted that Asquith's past direction had been characterized by trickery, he commented that "now [Asquith's] bag of tricks seems empty".[3]


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  3. ^ Greene, Graham (15 November 1935). "Last Love/Moscow Nights/Oil for the Lamps of China". The Spectator.  (reprinted in: John Russel, Taylor, ed. (1980). The Pleasure Dome. pp. 35–36. ISBN 0192812866. )