Night Terrors (Star Trek: The Next Generation)

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"Night Terrors"
Star Trek: The Next Generation episode
Episode no. Season 4
Episode 17
Directed by Les Landau
Story by Shari Goodhartz
Teleplay by Pamela Douglas
Jeri Taylor
Featured music Ron Jones
Production code 191
Original air date March 31, 1991 (1991-03-31)
Guest appearance(s)
Episode chronology
← Previous
"Galaxy's Child"
Next →
"Identity Crisis"
List of Star Trek: The Next Generation episodes

"Night Terrors" is the 91st episode of the American science fiction television series Star Trek: The Next Generation;[1] the 17th episode of the fourth season.[2][3]

Plot[edit]

The Enterprise is searching a binary star system in an effort to find the USS Brattain, a Federation science vessel which went missing a month previous. The crew locates the ship but the Brattain is derelict, and all the crew are dead save one: the ship's Betazoid science adviser, Andrus Hagan, who is discovered hiding in a room just off the bridge. Hagan has somehow survived, but he has been shaken by the experience and is in a profound catatonic state. Counselor Deanna Troi tries to use her telepathy to contact Hagan. Meanwhile, Geordi and Data set to work repairing the Brattain but discover that although everything is in working order, the ship still fails to move. Dr. Crusher determines that all of the Brattain's crew died at each other's hands. That night onward, Troi has trouble sleeping, encountering the same dream in which she levitates and drifts in the direction of a mysterious voice repeating, "Eyes in the dark, one moon circles". Troi starts to believe Hagan was influenced by the same dream.

Four days later, with the investigation stalled, Captain Picard decides that the time has come to move on, but the crew find the ship also stalled like the Brattain. Data discovers that both ships are trapped in a spatial phenomenon known as a "Tyken's Rift", and they can only escape through the force of a tremendous explosion. However, as they work at determining how to create this explosion, the crew starts becoming irritable and experiences hallucinations. Dr. Crusher realizes that everyone, but Troi, has failed to achieve R.E.M. sleep since entering the rift, leading to their current state. As violence begins to erupt around the ship, Picard assigns Data, who does not sleep or dream and is therefore unaffected, as acting Captain.

Data eventually attempts to use a pulse from the deflector aimed at the center of the rift to create the explosion, but this fails to produce any effect. As Data looks for other solutions with Troi, Troi gets an idea that her dreams of "eyes in the dark, one moon circling" is a description of a hydrogen atom. Data and Troi work out that there must be another ship from a psychic race trapped on the other side of the rift who is aware of their presence but looking for hydrogen to create an explosion. Troi goes to sleep to contact the other species through the dream, while Data vents hydrogen into the rift. An explosion soon occurs, and both the Enterprise and the alien ship are freed. As the crew recovers, Data returns the ship to Picard, but not before ordering everyone to get some sleep.

Production[edit]

The episode was intended as vehicle for Marina Sirtis, however she disliked it due to her fear of heights and the requirement that she be strapped into a flying harness.[4][5][3]

The model used for the USS Brattain is a the same as was used for the USS Reliant in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. The ship is occasionally referred to as the USS Brittain due to a spelling error on the exterior of the model.[1]

Reception[edit]

TechRepublic placed the episode in its list of "The five worst Star Trek: The Next Generation episodes ever".[6]

Zack Handlen of The A.V. Club noted that the episode "...lacked that mild twist at the end to make it memorable" but also that "This kind of episode is really the meat-and-potatoes of this sort of show, so it's impressive to realize that TNG has gotten to the point where delivering the expected is no longer entirely satisfactory".[2] According to James Hunt of Den of Geek "It’s not completely incompetent, but it’s hard to imagine anyone loving this episode".[7]

Johnathan Frakes referred to the episode as "a yawner".[4][3]

DVD[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Okuda, Michael; Okuda, Denise; Mirek, Debbie (2011-05-17). The Star Trek Encyclopedia. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 9781451646887. 
  2. ^ a b Handlen, Zack (2011-01-06). "Star Trek: The Next Generation: "Galaxy's Child"/"Night Terrors"". The AV Club. Retrieved 2017-04-25. 
  3. ^ a b c DeCandido, Keith (2012-04-17). "Star Trek: The Next Generation Rewatch: "Night Terrors"". Tor.com. Retrieved 2017-04-25. 
  4. ^ a b Clark, Mark (2013-06-01). Star Trek FAQ 2.0 (Unofficial and Unauthorized): Everything Left to Know About the Next Generation, the Movies, and Beyond. Hal Leonard Corporation. ISBN 9781480355002. 
  5. ^ Nemecek, Larry (2012-09-25). The Next Generation Companion: Star Trek The Next Generation. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 9781471106798. 
  6. ^ "The five worst Star Trek: The Next Generation episodes EVER! - TechRepublic". TechRepublic. Retrieved 2017-04-26. 
  7. ^ Hunt, James. "Revisiting Star Trek TNG: Night Terrors". Den of Geek. Retrieved 2017-04-25. 

External links[edit]