Nina Vale

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Nina Vale
Born Anne Hunter
Boston, Massachusetts
Nationality American
Occupation Actress
dancer

Nina Vale was an American actress and dancer, who had three leading roles in films of the 1940s, but stopped acting for unknown reasons.

Vale only acted in three movies.[1] It is not known why she didn't appear in any others.[2]

Early years[edit]

Vale was born in Boston as Anne Hunter. Because her parents objected to her desire to become an actress, she left home in her teenage years and went to New York City.[3]

Stage[edit]

Vale was a dramatics student of Benno Schneider in New York. Her work on stage there included acting in The Women. Later, she played a Russian sniper in a road-show production of Doughgirls.[3] In 1948, she was in Joy to the World in New Haven, Connecticut.[4] In 1949, she co-starred in a production of the comedy Reunion in Vienna.[5]

In 1959, she was billed as Anne Hunter in a performance of Passion, Poison, and Petrifaction.[6]

Film[edit]

Vale's first film was The Gay Falcon for RKO Pictures.[3]

Dance[edit]

In New York, Vale danced in The Girl from Wyoming and was featured in a New Faces revue. She also danced in a Los Angeles production of the operetta Bittersweet.[3]

Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nina Vale". 
  2. ^ "Nina Vale". Forgotten Actors. Retrieved 1 May 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Nina Vale Got Her Call When All Seemed Lost". New York, Brooklyn. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 20, 1946. p. 22. Retrieved January 17, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ "Out-of-Town Openings: Joy to the World" (PDF). Billboard. February 28, 1948. p. 47. Retrieved 18 January 2016. 
  5. ^ "Shakespearean Festival To Open At Camden; Florence Reed Comes To Lakewood Theater". Maine, Portland. Portland Press Herald. July 31, 1949. p. 26. Retrieved January 17, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  6. ^ Walker, Danton (September 3, 1959). "Broadway". Pennsylvania, Reading. Reading Eagle. p. 4. Retrieved 18 January 2016.