Noblis

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Coordinates: 38°57′06.1″N 77°21′46.8″W / 38.951694°N 77.363000°W / 38.951694; -77.363000

Noblis
Not-for-profit corporation
Founded1996
HeadquartersReston, Virginia, United States
Key people
Amr ElSawy
President and CEO
Number of employees
1000
Websitewww.noblis.org

Noblis is a not-for-profit corporation science, technology, and strategy organization that delivers technical and advisory solutions to federal government clients. The company’s work is applied to a wide array of federal domains, including national security and intelligence, transportation and telecommunications, citizen services, environmental sustainability, and health.

History[edit]

In 1996, Mitretek Systems was formed as a nonprofit corporation with a charter to perform research and engineering science and technology as a spin-off from the MITRE Corporation.[1]

Between 1996 and 2006, Mitretek Systems focused on national security threats, chemical and biological warfare, biometrics, electronic transactions, traffic congestion, patient safety, environmental sustainability, and renewed energy resources. Mitretek sponsored research projects included: analyzing and implementing technologies to keep information secure on the Internet, communicating voice and data by using Internet Protocol in the event of a national emergency, developing gaming technologies for first responders, and creating sick city scenarios to understand what happens during a naturally occurring, or terrorist-instigated biological event.

The organization changed its name to Noblis in 2007.[2]

Organization[edit]

Headquartered in Reston, VA, Noblis has offices in San Antonio, TX, Washington, DC, Belcamp, MD, Danville, VA, Bridgeport, WV, and Lexington, MA.[3]

Over 1000 employees work in science, engineering, research, and technology at Noblis.[4] In June 2014, Noblis Inc. was named a Top 2014 Workplace by the Washington Post in their annual feature.[5]

The firm's CEOs have been Lydia Thomas (1996-2007) and Amr ElSawy (2007–Present).[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Day, Kathleen (1996-02-23). "The Think Tank That Went Out for a Spin; Mitre Splits in Two to Answer Concerns That It Has an Unfair Edge in Government Work". The Washington Post.
  2. ^ "History". Noblis. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  3. ^ "Locations". Noblis. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  4. ^ "Our People". Noblis. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  5. ^ "2014 Top Workplaces". www.topworkplaces.com. Washington Post Magazine. Retrieved 7 August 2014.
  6. ^ "Leadership Team: Amr ElSawy". Noblis. Retrieved 7 March 2018.

External links[edit]