Norman Bryson

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William Norman Bryson (born 1949) is an Anglo American art historian who authored several major works that were particularly influential in the 1980s and 1990s. He graduated with a Ph.D. from Cambridge University in 1977, and subsequently worked as a professor at King's College until 1988, when he moved to Rochester, NY. There, he worked for two years at the University of Rochester before moving to Harvard University in 1990.[1] In a shift from that earlier period, he now is faculty at University of California, San Diego, and primarily writes about contemporary art, such as Sharon Lockhart. His career is characterized by a move to a more literary theory-based approach to art history,[2] including Word and Image: French Painting of the Ancien Régime (1983), Vision and Painting: The Logic of the Gaze (1986), and Tradition and Desire: From David to Delacroix (1987). He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1997.[3]

Works[edit]

Word and Image: French Painting in the Ancien Regime (1981)

Vision and Painting: The Logic of the Gaze (1983)

Tradition and Desire: From David to Delacroix (1984)

The Logic of the Gaze (1986)

Visual Theory: Painting and Interpretation (1989)

Looking at the Overlooked: Four Essays on Still Life Painting (1990)

In Medusa's Gaze: Still Life Paintings From Upstate New York Museums (1991)

Visual Culture: Images and Interpretations (1993)

Inside/ Out: New Chinese Art (1998)

References[edit]

  1. ^ admin (2018-02-21). "Bryson, Norman". Dictionary of Art Historians. Retrieved 2018-10-04.
  2. ^ "Bryson, Norman". worldcat.org. Retrieved January 31, 2017.
  3. ^ "John Simon Guggenheim Foundation | Norman Bryson". www.gf.org. Retrieved 2018-10-04.

External links[edit]